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  1. #1
    Coprolalia is offline Member 514 points
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    How come no one knows how to get licensed on this island?

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    I know a women who went to this school. She can't pass her step 1. So she wanted to start working as a doctor on Aruba. She contacted the school about getting licensed in this country and she got the run around.

    My question to this school.

    If you are giving degrees from this country but you don't know how to go about getting licensed and you give the students the run around, what gives?

    If you are going to be a legit school and want to be looked at as favorable. Shouldn't you at least know what the rules and steps are to get licensed in where you're at?

  2. #2
    abettertomorrow is offline Member 513 points
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    Cop...have you heard of this happening at other schools where the graduating student then stays and practices on the island??? This is a sincere question, because I've not. I mean, besides the practical intentions of setting up shop on the islands so N. Americans can be relatively close to home and still end up practicing back home, has an island school ever told its students to look into practicing on the island, or Europe, etc.? It would be an interesting backup plan (and come to think about it, there were some Ross'ers who wanted to do clinicals in England so they could eventually practice there- but the school stopped allowing that). But it seems like that would be expensive and/or distracting for the staff to focus on licensure on more than one country, even if it is where the school was set up. On a tertiary thought, are any of the professors there practicing medicine? If there were, surely they would have some incite towards the steps to licensure. But for a more direct route, why not just go directly to Aruba's version of a Professional Standards and Licensure agency. Just some thoughts...

  3. #3
    Coprolalia is offline Member 514 points
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    Tommorrow,

    I haven't heard of other people from other schools going that route, I'm sure its happened before. I'm just thinking that if the school is organized in another country then they should at least know its licensing laws.

    I'm sure she could or did eventually go to the islands med agency. I just find it irresponsible to not know the rules and regulations of the place were you are set up at. I know if I was a foreign business and set up shop in another country, I'd want to know the laws of my business in that country.

    just sayin'

  4. #4
    nrz04 is offline Newbie 511 points
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    Cop

    Think first before speaking...this school as well as other caribbean schools teach their course material based on the US Curriculum and US standards. If the island is a dutch island, wouldn't you think that you'd have to be qualified according to dutch laws to practice on the island? The girl you're talking about would have to go through a dutch medical school in order to be qualified to practice on the island. The first thing that caribbean schools tell you when you first arrive is that you're being taught the material to US Standards b/c you will be taking the USmle exam once you're done with basic sciences. You'd think if you went to med school you would know this better than anyone that each country has its own health standards and the requirements to practice in each country is different. Each country has its own laws that you must abide by in order to practice anything! Think abt it!

  5. #5
    fossildoc is offline Moderator 518 points
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    The reason Xavier graduates cannot practice in Aruba is because licensure requires graduation from a school recognized by the government of Holland. The vice president of Xavier has, on his long-term agenda, gaining such recognition, but it is a hard sell. The reason is that Holland is afraid that if Xavier is recognized as part of the Dutch medical education system, there will be a mass exodus of students from schools in Holland to Aruba, which is seen as a tourist paradise with year-round good weather, and therefore a favorable place to study.

    Recognition by Holland is highly desirable, because all countries in the European Union, plus a few others, have reciprocal licensing agreements. These countries have a two-tier set of requirements; one for graduates of EU schools and their satellite campuses, and one for everybody else. You can see this if you visit, for example, the medical licensing web sites of Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, Holland, and Belgium, all of which I have investigated. Recognition by Holland would enable Xavier graduates to practice not only in Aruba, but almost anywhere in western Europe and Eurasia.

    You might want to send email to the Xavier VP for a status update on this issue.
    Brain surgeon to another: "Hey, this isn't rocket science".
    Rocket scientist to another: "Hey, this isn't brain surgery".

    Forum Moderator - Xavier Aruba

  6. #6
    arubamd is offline Junior Member
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    hi
    i see all comments are bit older is it same situation currently ?
    on website it says
    Recognized by:
    International Medical Education Directory
    ECFMG (Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates)
    USMLE (United States Medical Licensing Examination )
    The Ministry of Education of the Netherlands (Dutch) Antilles
    United State Residency Match Program
    The World Health Organization Directory of Medical Education

    Netherlands (dutch) Antilles that mean locally approved ?
    i have seen few local students in school ......if this is not approved then why they are there ?

    i think there will be something more .........such as we have to do local residency or something ...............good to know the options ......

  7. #7
    fossildoc is offline Moderator 518 points
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    arubamd: thank you for pointing this out. I had not seen the "Ministry of Education..." phrase before. However, Xavier, like all the Carib schools, has a long history of making, well, technically correct but somewhat misleading statements on its web site, a fact which I vigorously complained about while I was a student there (review all my posts for examples). To resolve the question, you should send email to the school VP and ask this: "Is Xavier recognized by the Dutch Ministry of Education as being part of their official medical education program?" See if you get a straight answer. Don't be afraid to write to the VP; he's a straight-shooter, a bit rough sometimes, but I believe he is doing his best to lift the school out of the swamp it was in during the previous ownership.

    I can give you many examples of misleading statements under the previous ownership. When the school attempted to open a branch campus in Panama, it had an entire page devoted to the glowing reputation of the Universidad de Panama medical school, whose faculty and facilities Xavier was to use. It went on and on about the success of UP med students and all of its worldwide accreditations. But the fact was that there was absolutely, positively no relationship whatsoever between their program and Xavier's. Xavier was merely renting the space and the professors to teach Xavier's, not UP's, curriculum. I challenged the administration on this, and never got an answer. Therefore, I would check every statement you see on the school web site, and determine whether what you are led to believe is actually the real deal.

    As for locals at the school, there were a few local students when I was there; they got a tuition break as part of the deal with the Aruban government. One of them -- sorry, I can't give her name -- got deported back to Aruba because she couldn't get a visa that lasted long enough to even start clinicals in Atlanta. Another went to Holland to do clinicals; as an Aruban national, there may have been some special deal worked out with a Dutch med school. A third student I believe is still in Aruba, wondering what to do. I saw the identical situation at the first med school I attended, MUA Belize, in which local students were left stranded after completing Basic Sciences, because the school could not place them anywhere for clinicals (nor did they try). and Belize wanted nothing to do with the place except to collect taxes. MUAB was "recognized" by Belize in the same way I suspect Xavier is recognized by Holland, that is, as a business entity authorized to do business on the island, but not as part of the official medical establishment. Hence MUAB graduates could not practice in Belize. Check out the Dutch recognition and let us all know.
    Brain surgeon to another: "Hey, this isn't rocket science".
    Rocket scientist to another: "Hey, this isn't brain surgery".

    Forum Moderator - Xavier Aruba

  8. #8
    arubamd is offline Junior Member
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    :-)

    yes fosill, i see you have strong point over here.
    As well i am not in condition to argue about anything here.
    i am very new to this place, do not know who is even VP and currently i do not think i want to ask any upsetting questions as well currently i am only planing for USA (second choice would be India)

    However just like everyone else i would like to have my option open. I believe we never know where life takes us. Well if i am not mistaken i was told that end of the 2010 xavier as well as all saints both medical school got approval from the duch gov.

    well this was told by students who has been here but that does not make any official news (thus you could be correct ). well i guess the local students i am talking aobut few of them look like well organized about their goal as well what happens to students who are not even from usa or Canada or duch ......i came across students from very different countries they hold visa in aruba as well they need visa in usa and canada ...how do they get it .....

    i thought local students hold duch passport, as an European Union they can easily get visa vs students from Kenya or Sudan or Nepal ......(hard to get visa in USA country) i saw students like that too ....

    also your point to do business in country vs association or recognition by that country is different and it could be possible

    I will have to check out if duch educational system recognize this school or not but if one student did rotation in Netherlands then i guess it is recognized enough to go threw system ...i guess she would be getting residency after her rotation in Netherlands

    if you do not mind i would like to ask you that did u leave school ? or graduate ? if u left school what made u motivate? if you graduate then are u getting rotation easily or doing residency? how is your experience ?

    you know much more about school then i do b
    Last edited by arubamd; 02-13-2011 at 09:15 AM.

  9. #9
    fossildoc is offline Moderator 518 points
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    arubamd: I graduated and am currently studying for Step 1. The students of my graduating class pursued two strategies for taking Step 1. About half, against my advice, took one or two semesters off during clinicals, in order to study for Step 1. They did this so that they could pass Step 1 (and 2), and begin residency immediately after graduation. The other half, including myself, decided to graduate as quickly as possible, then take time off to study for Steps. For most students, especially those of my age, there is no way to be prepared for Step 1 without some type of break, because there is a disconnect between what you learn in class and what you need to know for the test. (This situation has improved, however, under the new administration.) Most of the students who took Step 1 without a break failed it on the first try. The reason I advised against taking a break before graduation was that extending the time to graduation risked having the school change policies to the detriment of the students. Sure enough, they raised tuition, imposed mandatory health insurance, dispersed the locations of fifth semester and clinicals, required the keeping of patient logs, and required Step 1 to graduate; I escaped all of these by not taking any breaks. I am now acquainted with students who finished Basic Sciences with me but are still in school because they took study breaks, and they are suffering greatly because they have to travel extensively to do their clinicals and have to pay higher tuition and insurance fees.

    No, no, you cannot assume anything from the fact that one student did rotations in Holland. That student was an Aruban national. Aruba used to be a possession of Holland, and there are close ties between the two countries. You will not be able to take advantage of that.

    My advice is to graduate as soon as possible. If you must take a break to study for Steps, do it after graduation.
    Brain surgeon to another: "Hey, this isn't rocket science".
    Rocket scientist to another: "Hey, this isn't brain surgery".

    Forum Moderator - Xavier Aruba

  10. #10
    arubamd is offline Junior Member
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    fossile

    here i found on internet ........internet can not be really a fact but still
    How can a foreign medical graduate join post graduation/ residency in Netherlands.How can he obtain a lisence? - Yahoo! Answers

    check this out ...........

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