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  1. #1
    carribdoc is offline Junior Member 511 points
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    States we can apply to

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    Those who have done Texas rotations are not green book. Contact the texas medical board if you have any doubts or questions. Think about it- if auc which has been teying for so many years to get tx rotations cant how can we? Bc they ensure that all there rotarions done by students is greenbook and will not allow their students to not rotate at non greenbook hospitals. So why would they allow us. Well bc our rotations arent Greenbook. However if you set up your own rotations through connections, and they are greenbook, then the state becomes open to you. Same thing with pennslyvania and new jersey. New york is not possible unless you did all your cores at jnf in kitts. Michigan ohio illinois and most midwest states are open. Not sure about tennessee or kansas though bc of some weird clause

    Virginia is desired by all applicants. the founder of windsor used to live in virginia. But it really depends on the year you apply. It is a state where it almost seems like everyone who entered a residency program has some connection to the field. One of my friends who matched there mom is a pediatrician in the department of pediatrics in richmond. She tells me that most of the residents had some link almost sometimes directly to the departments. Its all based on luck the year you apply

    Florida you can apply. Georgia yes. Arizona yes.

    West coast- get outta here. Oregon is literally on a case by case basis and washington is filled worh applicants from cali med schools who cant get a residency spot in cali and would rather stay on the west coast.

    Ohio, illinois, and michigan are def the states with the highest chance of matching. Wisconsin surprisigly is a desired place for american grads. Minnesota can go either way

    MA yes. vermont yes. Most northeast is open. Hopefully this helps this years applicants!
    Last edited by carribdoc; 07-30-2015 at 10:19 PM.

  2. #2
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    HarleyQuinn is offline Newbie 510 points
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    What is it about Windsor that makes California and the states that follow it, so difficult to get approval? Or why doesnt Windsor pursue this more aggressively? Im sure this question has been asked repeatedly, but was just hoping that maybe this time around, someone has a more... accurate/truthful answer. Being from California, this for me is kind of a big deal. Some people may not feel this way, but for prospective students from California, it cant help but be asked.

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    PnS11 is offline Senior Member 6123 points
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    Only four Carib schools are Cali approved. It's pretty much the last step in gaining all 50 state approval for a Carib school, after getting NY approval.

    I guess Cali asks for curriculum to meet certain standards and rotations to be of a certain quality. That takes a lot of money, especially since rotation sites are fought over like gang territory now and the "best" sites are generally hospitals that belong to more expensive Carib schools like Ross and SGU. Having hospital rotations as opposed to sitting in clinics like most low-end Carib schools have is a big difference in quality of education and exposure.

    I also imagine it has to do with Step scores. The average score for students at that school, the pass rate, # of times needed to repeat, etc.

    You will likely not be practicing in Cali unless you graduate from a Top Four Carib school. Or ten years after gaining state licensure somewhere else. That's about 17 years from now (4 MD+ 2-4 residency+ 10 years in another state).

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    DrHonorMed is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    St. George, Ross, AUC, SABA, AUA and almost all Dominican Republic Med schools are Cali approved!!!

  5. #5
    anno is offline Newbie 511 points
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    what california doing is totally unfair, because aua was a new school, but it got approved by california very quickly. and california also proved lots of medical schools all over the world, did california send people to inspect those medical schools, they certainly didn't.

    after all, if a person is able to pass all exams, get licensed, then what makes this person unfit to be a doctor in california?

    i didn't know that those doctors can work in california after 10 years. 10 years is still too long.

    this is another form of discrimination.

  6. #6
    carribdoc is offline Junior Member 511 points
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    You can work in california at the various VA Medical Centers (army/federal hospitals) after residency from an ACGME accredited program and have a state license from any of the states.

    However, their requirement for obvious reasons is you have to be a US Citizen, have a US College/University Degree, have a spotless record, and have without a shadow of a doubt commitment and loyalty towards the US. With those requirements and being totally white washed, then you can work in California immediately after residency

  7. #7
    PnS11 is offline Senior Member 6123 points
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    california has their own laws for a lot of things. they are almost like a different country from the US when it comes to those laws. emission standards, environmental standards, etc. they are very "green" first and foremost. and then there are laws regarding other things like drugs and the sorts.

    its unfortunate they have their list and strict guidelines, but what most carib students need to understand is that they were outcast from their country's medical schools and therefore don't quite deserve the same luxuries as those that did gain admission the proper route. be it a US school or a Big Four school. at least not immediately, anyways. there are hurdles to overcome. this is not racism or any other sort of discrimination since some one from the UK or india or china or australia can still practice in CA.

    not all medical schools are the same, especially within the caribbean. unfortunately, some good schools and candidates are turned away but then you can blame the diploma mills that most caribbean medical schools are for sending in poor candidates that become a liability.

    get a residency first then complain about how you have to wait ten years before going california. it's a highly-sought after spot that will always give preference to US students regardless of the impending shortage of doctors in a state as large as california.

  8. #8
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    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    Ahhh, politics are an unfair and faithless mistress, anno.

    That is the thing about medical licensing being on a state-to-state basis -- states can discriminate as to who they want to have as doctors, and who they wish to exclude. Some are comparatively lax. Others are ridiculously strict. Does it make logical sense to accept a degree from a ramshackle, state-run, medical school in a war-torn region without even a proper library, and to reject a degree from a comparatively more established medical school in the Carib? Not really, no. But hey, applying logic to political decisions -- and make no mistake, that is what they are -- is a fool's errand.

    Take heart, though. The whole ten year thing in California didn't even exist until just a year or three ago. Before that, people were completely poop-out-of-luck no matter how long they were licensed in another state.

    Quote Originally Posted by anno View Post
    what california doing is totally unfair, because aua was a new school, but it got approved by california very quickly. and california also proved lots of medical schools all over the world, did california send people to inspect those medical schools, they certainly didn't.

    after all, if a person is able to pass all exams, get licensed, then what makes this person unfit to be a doctor in california?

    i didn't know that those doctors can work in california after 10 years. 10 years is still too long.

    this is another form of discrimination.

    "When I haven't any
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  9. #9
    carribdoc is offline Junior Member 511 points
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    you all want california approval? well first thing is then, the school needs to raise tuition to about 15k a semester just like the other california carrib approved schools charge. with tuition being about 5k, there is no way that is enough money to upgrade facilities, and most importantly buy and pay greenbook hospitals where only windsor students can rotate. that costs money, which would simply in financial terms mean raising the tuition to about 3x more than it is now. while ts not all a money game, a big factor of it is.

  10. #10
    PnS11 is offline Senior Member 6123 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by carribdoc View Post
    you all want california approval? well first thing is then, the school needs to raise tuition to about 15k a semester just like the other california carrib approved schools charge. with tuition being about 5k, there is no way that is enough money to upgrade facilities, and most importantly buy and pay greenbook hospitals where only windsor students can rotate. that costs money, which would simply in financial terms mean raising the tuition to about 3x more than it is now. while ts not all a money game, a big factor of it is.
    it's definitely all a money game. even if it's a political game, money still swings a big stick in politics too. the political side is a factor when the US is involved, so landing rotation sites and quality ones, at that.

    tuition at sgu is $25k a semester and that's without the extraneous fees too i believe. if that's the secret behind getting proper rotation spots, or more of them, then i'll gladly retroactively pay $25k for my 10 semesters at windsor.

    but that 50 state approval thing is a big thing. ny has all the img friendly residencies. they are crap residencies that want IMGs because it's all scut work and little learning, but a residency is a residency and NY has the most along with NJ. if you look at match lists, it is a luxury big 4 schools have to be able to apply every where a US student can, so long as they accept IMGs.

    however, when it comes to windsor, i bet a lot of the money is just kept in the professor's pockets and not necessarily with the school itself to spend on proper equipment. they built a library and another building but the first thing they needed was a fresh cadaver that didn't make the room smell like an alcholic hooker fart. priorities: admin doesn't really have them. that's why the caricom approval thing is such a big deal because i doubt it happens if we're building libraries and ish but not actually getting student pass rates up and other numbers that accreditation really cares about.

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