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  1. #1
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    How about day to day life In the D.R.?

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    Hey everyone. I'm seriously considering attending UNIBE next year, but before I make my final decision, I would like to have a better idea of day to day life in the D.R. For example, do blackouts happen as regularyl as I keep hearing. What am I looking at in terms of rent for a small apartment, groceries, utilities and other living expenses? This and other insights, stories,or advice about day to day living in the Dominican Republic( particularly Santo Domingo) would be greatly appreciated. Thank you>
    Fritz.

  2. #2
    laudy_dah1977 is offline Newbie
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    this might help

    I am heading out to the DR as of January and cant tell you much but maybe this link will help.

    http://dr1.com/forums/showthread.php...threadid=27155

  3. #3
    maruka is offline Newbie
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    Fritz.......Some info on Santo Domingo

    Hi. maybe I can be of some use here. I will be attending UNIBE in Jan and have been living in the Dom Rep. (Santo Domingo) for the past 5 yrs. (husband is Dominican). Yes, unfortunately blackputs are a part of life here, depending on the politcal climate , they can happen everyday and for hours on end. I would suggest that when looking for an apartment, you look for one equipped with a power inverter (battery powered auxiliary energy source for blackout periods) otherwise you will not be a happy camper....it gets hot and light is important when you're studying...it can affect you morale. I just bought anew one not too long ago and paid RD$28,000.00 at "Trace" (the best in DR) -- I think the US dollar was at 35 when we bought it so it was less than a thousand bucks and well worth the peace of mind....you can most likely get away with buying a smaller one (mine is 1 kilo)....I have a three bedroom apartment and a small son so I took that into account when buying. Make it a priority.

    As far as rent goes, it depends on where you rent (like in most places). I live in the sector called "Bella Vista" and we pay a total of RD$13,000.00 which is approximately US$350.00 and it is pretty big, two bathrooms, three bedroomms, a balcony and maid's quarters (all apartments here have them) and we're around the corner from "Mirador Sur" which is Santo Domingo's answer to Central Park....really nice, quiet a great place fro my little boy. You can find pretty good deals but you have to stay away from the sharks (Dominicans looking to make a quick buck off unsuspecting, trusting and naive Americans) Defend whats yours and try to get the most for your money. UNIBE is in a sector of the city called "gazcue"...lots if scummy (not all European are scummy just the majority of the ones I've rune into down there) europeans live there and I consider it to be a haven for those Dominican "sharks" that will try to separate you from your money. The best sectors to live in would be "El Vergel" (not too far from UNIBE), "Evaristo Morales" (close to the center of the city a little farther than Vergel but nice place with lots of stores within walikng distance), "Bella Vista" (more residential not too far from UNibe but better if you have a car..about 10-15 min car ride if theres little traffic), and "las Praderas" (also residential....this is pretty far and I would'nt advise unless you have a car) I am not sure but I think you can ship a car in from the states and still keep your old license plate from the states....My sister in law's neighbors are from Perto Rico and they have Plates from Puerto Rico and just hang a "UNIBE Student" thingy on their rearview mirror.

    Ok, utilities, I pay an average of RD$1,000.00 a month approximately US$26.00 and I use an air conditioner almost every night so it's not too bad , some months it's higher than others.

    Advice for day to day living.....try to be happy here, don't compare this to the U.S. because it will never measure up (I did that at the beginning and made myslef pretty miserable doing it until I stopped and just accepted this place for what it is) You can run into some pretty nice peple here as well as people who are not so nice ...this is a third wolrd country trying to live like 1st world country(you will see MDonald's, Burger King, Taco Bell, large multiplex theaters) and many people want a piece of the pie so you have to learn how to weed out the sincere from the insincere folks. Generally the people are nice and friendly. The politiacl atmosphere here is stable for the most part although there is always a general dissatisfaction with the President at this time but that could be said about many countries...it certainly is nowhere near coup status so in that sense I guess you could call it stable ....lately the dollar has fluctuated quite a bit ...goinf very high (which is good fro some of us but not for evryone else. The beaches are really nice but the closest swimming beach is about forty minutes away so don't come with surfboard in hand (no waves anyway..LOL).

    Anways, that's my take on it...hope I helped some...If you have any more questions, lemme know. Good luck!

  4. #4
    maruka is offline Newbie
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    Fritz.......Some info on Santo Domingo

    Hi. maybe I can be of some use here. I will be attending UNIBE in Jan and have been living in the Dom Rep. (Santo Domingo) for the past 5 yrs. (husband is Dominican). Yes, unfortunately blackouts are a part of life here, depending on the politcal climate , they can happen everyday and for hours on end. I would suggest that when looking for an apartment, you look for one equipped with a power inverter (battery powered auxiliary energy source for blackout periods) otherwise you will not be a happy camper....it gets hot and light is important when you're studying...it can affect you morale. I just bought anew one not too long ago and paid RD$28,000.00 at "Trace" (the best in DR) -- I think the US dollar was at 35 when we bought it so it was less than a thousand bucks and well worth the peace of mind....you can most likely get away with buying a smaller one (mine is 1 kilo)....I have a three bedroom apartment and a small son so I took that into account when buying. Make it a priority.

    As far as rent goes, it depends on where you rent (like in most places). I live in the sector called "Bella Vista" and we pay a total of RD$13,000.00 which is approximately US$350.00 and it is pretty big, two bathrooms, three bedroomms, a balcony and maid's quarters (all apartments here have them) and we're around the corner from "Mirador Sur" which is Santo Domingo's answer to Central Park....really nice, quiet a great place fro my little boy. You can find pretty good deals but you have to stay away from the sharks (Dominicans looking to make a quick buck off unsuspecting, trusting and naive Americans) Defend whats yours and try to get the most for your money. UNIBE is in a sector of the city called "gazcue"...lots if scummy (not all European are scummy just the majority of the ones I've rune into down there) europeans live there and I consider it to be a haven for those Dominican "sharks" that will try to separate you from your money. The best sectors to live in would be "El Vergel" (not too far from UNIBE), "Evaristo Morales" (close to the center of the city a little farther than Vergel but nice place with lots of stores within walikng distance), "Bella Vista" (more residential not too far from UNibe but better if you have a car..about 10-15 min car ride if theres little traffic), and "las Praderas" (also residential....this is pretty far and I would'nt advise unless you have a car) I am not sure but I think you can ship a car in from the states and still keep your old license plate from the states....My sister in law's neighbors are from Perto Rico and they have Plates from Puerto Rico and just hang a "UNIBE Student" thingy on their rearview mirror.

    Ok, utilities, I pay an average of RD$1,000.00 a month approximately US$26.00 and I use an air conditioner almost every night so it's not too bad , some months it's higher than others.

    Advice for day to day living.....try to be happy here, don't compare this to the U.S. because it will never measure up (I did that at the beginning and made myslef pretty miserable doing it until I stopped and just accepted this place for what it is) You can run into some pretty nice peple here as well as people who are not so nice ...this is a third wolrd country trying to live like 1st world country(you will see MDonald's, Burger King, Taco Bell, large multiplex theaters) and many people want a piece of the pie so you have to learn how to weed out the sincere from the insincere folks. Generally the people are nice and friendly. The politiacl atmosphere here is stable for the most part although there is always a general dissatisfaction with the President at this time but that could be said about many countries...it certainly is nowhere near coup status so in that sense I guess you could call it stable ....lately the dollar has fluctuated quite a bit ...goinf very high (which is good fro some of us but not for evryone else. The beaches are really nice but the closest swimming beach is about forty minutes away so don't come with surfboard in hand (no waves anyway..LOL).

    Anways, that's my take on it...hope I helped some...If you have any more questions, lemme know. Good luck!

  5. #5
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    thanks for the info

    Hey laudy dah for the dr1 link. There was a lot of info there.Thanks for the info. Maruka the info you posted was tons of help. I really apreciate it. I know that the best way to get a feel for the country is to actually go down and visit(which I will), but I feel like the info you gave me a good idea of what to expect. Thanks for the info. Just wanted to find out how your doing in your first semester at UNIBE?

  6. #6
    Andrew21 is offline Senior Member
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    peso

    Hey---my dad just got back from a medical mission trip in Santo Domingo, and the DR peso is currently 42 DR peso to 1 USD. Just a bit of info for you... Additionally, I know of at least two men, both natives of DR, who went to UNIBE and are now practicing cardiologists in Philly. I like hearing stuff like that! Good luck and enjoy your time!

    Andy

  7. #7
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    thanks for the information.

    Thanks for the info Andy, I really apreciate it. Hearing info like that only reinforces my decision to go unibe.

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