Sponsored Links
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    chicka is offline Newbie 510 points
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    6
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Desperately Want to Learn More about this school-Current Students Pls Help

    Advertisements



    Hi,

    I am a prospective student and I am considering Trinity. Its been difficult to learn more about this school and previous threads have showed conflicting views. I would like to know the good, the bad and the ugly about Trinity. They do a really good job selling this school, that it seems to good to be true and I'd like to know what I'll be getting myself into. If someone could answer my questions I'd really appreciate it.

    -What do you like most about this school?
    -What do you hate most about this school?
    -What would you change?
    -How is St. Vincent as an Island? Do you like it? Are the people nice? Is it safe How expensive are groceries?
    -How are the teaching facilities? Are there adequate resources (eg. cadaver to student ratio)?
    -How are the professors in general? (Please be honest about this)
    -How is the curriculum and teaching style? Since this school is new, do you feel like they are experimenting with you guys?
    -What are your favourite and least favourite classes?
    -What challenges have you faced there?
    -They advertise clinicals as early as first year. Do you think these are helpful to learning? Do you actually interact with patients and doctors or do you merely observe?
    -Are clinicals all greenbook? How are they? How do you find yourself in terms of performance in comparison to your US/caribbean counterparts? Do you feel prepared?
    -What has the school done to try and obtain all 50 states of approval?
    -Would you recommend this school?
    -If you could do it again, would you?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    MDOnly is offline Newbie 510 points
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    12
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    -What do you like most about this school?
    *** Pre-clinical experience from your beginning term. With the increasing class, they are starting to slack on that because they cant transport that many students at once to the hospital. you should ask them about that. Also, they integrated the kaplan program from term 1 which is where u actually learn.
    -What do you hate most about this school?
    *** some of the worse facurlty ever starting from the professors allllll the way to the dean. After the dean changed a year back, all the good professors left the school, the entire administration was swapped out or forced to leave if they revolted against the ways of the new dean. Dean himself has no respect for students and doesnt care about you at all. dont ever go to his office cuz he will literally ask you to leave. all new professors most being PHDs who are not the best at preparing you for the USMLE. more details if needed.
    -What would you change?
    *** a bit more comfort by the administration
    -How is St. Vincent as an Island? Do you like it? Are the people nice? Is it safe How expensive are groceries?
    *** small, third world, island that has a limited supply of your usual wants. people are gems there tho. very nice. groceries are about double the price because of the import taxes.
    -How are the teaching facilities? Are there adequate resources (eg. cadaver to student ratio)?
    *** terrible teachers who rely on you to learn on your own. One cadaver for the entire school.
    -How are the professors in general? (Please be honest about this)
    *** terrible as stated before. PHDs. One teacher doesnt even care if you answered a correct answer on an exam and still got it wrong. its their way or the highway. no point on arguing or speaking to someone of higher power. They will direct you to each other. After years of negative feedback on some professors, they still are employed. and the best ones end up leaving.
    -How is the curriculum and teaching style? Since this school is new, do you feel like they are experimenting with you guys?
    *** still looking for new, better, cheaper professors to teach. many visiting professors who complete a subject in two weeks which is barely any time to digest the info.
    -What are your favourite and least favourite classes?
    favorite was biochem and pathology who had the best professors but not anymore. worse i would say is MICROBIOLOGY!!
    -They advertise clinicals as early as first year. Do you think these are helpful to learning? Do you actually interact with patients and doctors or do you merely observe?
    *** Very, you will feel like u have much more knowledge than many other med students.
    -Would you recommend this school?
    *** if you struggle, ur gonna be stuck there for a while or even get let go. If you mind your own and do well, you can get places which is true in any school.
    -If you could do it again, would you?
    *** I prefer a school who teaches you basic sciences as well as professionalism. professionalism is not present here. Students get neglected, they have their favorites, and some cant even speak to you respectfully. As physicians themselves, some lack the ability to listen to problems, comfort, and take your problems seriously which is pretty opposite of the qualities a physician should have.


    hope i answered most of ur questions. if u need more info or anyone else, you can pm me.

  3. #3
    ktjacobson08 is offline Newbie 510 points
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    What do you like most about this school?
    -Quite frankly what I like most about Trinity is the fact that they are giving me the opportunity to earn a medical degree and that they have prepared me adequately to compete with US trained students. My personal USMLE score and scores from a couple of fellow students that I have asked have all been quite good and demonstrate adequate preparation from the school. That's not to say that different people don't use different studying techniques or supplement with alternative sources besides just teachers. This is only my opinion, I used teacher's lectures and the textbooks as my main studying resources and I thought they were vital to doing well.

    What do you hate most about this school?
    -The lack of labs is probably the most frustrating thing. Hate is a strong word but it would've been nice to have more cadaver time or microscopes to use for microbiology. When the last person posted 1 cadaver for the whole school, that's being a little bit generous. I didn't do any dissections or anything hands on with the cadaver during my 5 terms there. It is unfortunate but I tried to supplement by being proactive and going to the hospital as often as I could; often in my own free time. You can arrange to go and see autopsies performed, surgeries done, or just go along on rounds and interact with patients. Just be proactive about getting doctors contact information and they are always very accommodating.

    What would you change?
    -Like the last person said now that class sizes are getting bigger it's more difficult to do school sanctioned rotations because they have to arrange to get everyone there and if you want to have a meaningful rotation you don't want to be with 10 other students. If I could change anything I would like to see more buses so that more students can get to the hospital and more preceptors being used so that the student groups don't have to be quite as large.

    How is St. Vincent as an Island? Do you like it? Are the people nice? Is it safe How expensive are groceries?
    -I loved St. Vincent. The climate was right up my alley. You're outside a lot whether it be studying outside, working out, playing sports, or something else. The ocean is within walking distance of most of the apartment complexes (I'm pretty sure). The people are extremely friendly and very rarely did I feel like I was in danger. Of course there are dangerous places on the island so part of feeling safe is avoiding those places and situations. Locals are always looking to strike up conversations and meet the "docs" that come and study there and if something like a ride is needed they, in my experience, were always willing to help.

    How are the teaching facilities? Are there adequate resources (eg. cadaver to student ratio)?
    -Teaching facilities are a little bit trickier now that class sizes are larger because one of the former classrooms can't accomodate the new size classes. It turns into a little bit of a juggling act trying to get all 5 terms into all of their classes when there are four reasonably sized classrooms. I only had to deal with this issue for one term and it didn't affect me much. Some of the other students might have had more issues with it than me. The resources issue I think I dealt with in one of the earlier questions.

    How are the professors in general? (Please be honest about this)
    -First thing I want to say is that not every teacher is going to be a rock star. I had some teachers that I liked more than others but this would be the same in any school you go to so you have to work at it to figure out what various teachers are good at. Some teachers are good in lectures while others are good in 1 on 1 situations. Some are very clinical where others are more involved in the basic sciences. The second thing I want to say is that if you go to a Caribbean school you have to realize that your hand will not be held and you won't be coddled through school like it would in the US. Teachers will help you if you go and ask them. I never had an experience where a teacher asked me to leave or refused me help. Sometimes I had to come back later when they weren't in the middle of something but I was never denied help and like I said earlier I used the professors powerpoints and lecture notes very heavily to help me study. Don't go to the professors blaming them for mistakes and berating them about being bad teachers and they'll be more eager to help you and will go to extra lengths if needed to help you understand the problems. There were no professors that I felt were stupid and didn't understand their own material but there was one class, biostatistics where he mainly read off his slides. That was the one class that I felt could maybe do with a teaching change.

    How is the curriculum and teaching style? Since this school is new, do you feel like they are experimenting with you guys?
    -The only term that might be "experimented on" on a bit is term 5. I think that recently they've gotten a better idea for it implemented and I think it'll stay that way. The curriculum in most of the main classes, ie anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, genetics, immunology/microbiology, pathology, and pharmacology is thorough. The extra classes neuro, histology, behavioral sciences, biostatistics are often very short and abbreviated. Physiology is difficult because of the same reason. It's been visiting professors that come for mostly periods of 1 - 2 weeks and cram a whole section in that time. It can be done but realize that you are going to have to read extra stuff and learn some things on your own. Once again, you can go in and ask teachers for help but don't go to them and expect to get an hour long lecture on the subject. Read the material, try to understand it on your own, go ask for help with certain mechanisms or specifics that you need.

    What are your favourite and least favourite classes?
    -My favorite classes were pharmacology and neuroscience/neuroanatomy because the material was the most interesting to me. My least favorite classes were biostatistics and histology because of the reasons I've mentioned in the previous questions.

    What challenges have you faced there?
    -You do face the challenge of being more proactive about your studying and your networking. It's what comes with the territory of going to a caribbean school. Be assertive and unafraid of the answer no.

    They advertise clinicals as early as first year. Do you think these are helpful to learning? Do you actually interact with patients and doctors or do you merely observe?
    -Clinicals usually start around week 3 and I think they are one of the biggest advantages you get about coming to Trinity. It's hands-on learning. Deal with patients right from the very get go (which in week 3 is very nerve wracking but you quickly get the hang of it). You can do things like take blood, set up EKGs, be present for exams, perform minimal actions in surgery like opening equipment and prepping the patients. Like I said before just remember to be as assertive and social as you can. Get contact information and arrange extra opportunities as often as you can.

    Are clinicals all greenbook? How are they? How do you find yourself in terms of performance in comparison to your US/caribbean counterparts? Do you feel prepared?
    -I'm pretty sure they are all greenbook, yes. I hope others say the same thing so I don't look stupid. And yes I do feel prepared and ready to compete at a level on par with or above my US counterparts.

    What has the school done to try and obtain all 50 states of approval?
    -Trinity has its FAIMER accreditation which I believe opens it to all the states except California, Texas, New York, and Florida. Right now Trinity is on a 3 month limit for rotations in New York. And the next step of their accreditation which I believe takes place this fall would open up Florida if it goes successfully.

    Would you recommend this school? If you could do it again, would you?
    -This is, of course, only my opinion but yes I do recommend this school. And if I had to do it again, absolutely. This is my interpretation of the whole medical school scenario. US schools are insanely difficult to get into but if you get into them, you're much less likely to fail out. The pertinent information is displayed readily for you via a tried and true curriculum and the lab resources are present for every student. As a student you need to do the normal study activities like read your textbooks and review your lecture notes and you can do well. Caribbean schools are kind of the opposite. Easy to get into but more difficult to stay in. You have to work harder than a US student in order to actively learn the same amount of material. For example because some classes are shorter, professors won't have the time to go into every facet of a subject. To make up for it, you may have to read chapters of your textbook that were never went over. And there are two types of students who go to caribbean schools; those who screwed up somewhere along the line preparing for medical school are the first group. Maybe they got some C's and D's in their college classes. Maybe they got a lower MCAT score. Maybe they didn't do enough volunteer work. Whatever the case something was lacking in their application. They could take time and fix those issues and probably eventually get into a US school. The second group are those who caribbean school is really their last resort. They can get in fine but it's difficult to make it through the program successfully and it becomes a long, drawn out, expensive ordeal. Decide which group you're in and if it's the former I say go for it. If it's the latter, think long and hard before doing it.

  4. #4
    rasta14 is offline Newbie 510 points
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    -What do you like most about this school?
    I thought that the administration was very attentive to the needs of the students. I have read the responses to this thread stating otherwise however you must realize that people may have a different experience with the administration. From what I have witnessed myself, most of these people I speak of become frustrated because of lack of success, and in turn become frustrated with, well, everyone….

    -What do you hate most about this school?
    I hate that the federal government will not sponsor our loans yet. I understand it is a new and growing school, however our step and matching scores are pretty competitive especially for an international school

    -What would you change?
    I felt that in my time the administration was a bit understaffed. Maybe if there were more than one person handling 20 different things, some things would have gone more smoothly.

    -How is St. Vincent as an Island? Do you like it? Are the people nice? Is it safe How expensive are groceries?
    Saint Vincent was ok, it’s very 3rd world. However what I learned is to adjust to island life. Groceries for example are much more expensive, IF you are sticking to American brands. To live cheaper I switched up to local foods, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with changing up your diet a bit! Outside of that it isn’t the typical American life (no malls, and essentially nothing but the pure nature to explore), but it’s and island so I’m not sure what more you can expect.

    -How are the teaching facilities? Are there adequate resources (eg. cadaver to student ratio)?
    The teaching facilities were ok, very typical of any school I thought. When I was in attendance we actually had 4 cadavers….

    -How are the professors in general? (Please be honest about this)
    The visiting professors will vary, some were good, others weren’t, however the academic committee is doing their best to monitor efficiency and recruit new professors where they are needed. I thought that all of the permanent professors were awesome.

    -How is the curriculum and teaching style? Since this school is new, do you feel like they are experimenting with you guys?
    The curriculum was good. I felt that the professors in general gave you a detailed road map, and encouraged you as professional student to fully understand, read, and learn more. I think at this point in your career you must take responsibility. In all fairness, no medical program is going to spoon feed you, nor does any program prepare you with everything that you need for board exams, hence no medical school has a 100% passing rate. As far as experimentation, I do feel like the school is trying to see what works in all areas but none of it has negatively affected the students.

    -What are your favourite and least favourite classes?
    Honestly I didn’t like the classes with visiting professors, it’s annoying adjusting to a new teaching style. My favorite class was pathology. I felt that it was very thorough, great professors, and I barely had to touch the topic before taking my board exam.

    -What challenges have you faced there?
    Most of my challenges were financial. I can’t really speak on any other challenges

    -They advertise clinicals as early as first year. Do you think these are helpful to learning? Do you actually interact with patients and doctors or do you merely observe?
    I did find this very helpful. It introduces you to the approach of a patient. We typically rounded as small groups on patients then presented them to the attending, then saw the patient as a group.

    -Are clinicals all greenbook? How are they? How do you find yourself in terms of performance in comparison to your US/caribbean counterparts? Do you feel prepared?
    Not all are greenbook, however that depends where you decide to do you clinicals (ie there will likely be less greenbook in a place that is overpopulated with other medical schools completing clinicals). You also have a choice.

    -What has the school done to try and obtain all 50 states of approval?
    They are currently working on the CAAM approval, of which our own students participated in.

    -Would you recommend this school?
    Yes, definitely

    -If you could do it again, would you?
    Absolutely, my experience was unique and I would not take it back for anything

  5. #5
    camirenee's Avatar
    camirenee is offline Junior Member 516 points
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    SVG
    Posts
    46
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Im at SJSM in SVG and I have to say that Trinity is probably the most stabilized and organized school on the island. I see Trinity shuttle busses everywhere on any given day so they must be doing something right! At the same time, SJSM has great potential as well.
    Look back, laugh, and move forward. Hidden Content

    Student at Saint James School of Medicine

Similar Threads

  1. Current students at UNIBE Med School...
    By cocomadmoiselle in forum UNIBE and Dominican Medical Schools
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-02-2013, 12:29 PM
  2. Chinese students learn their school isn't WHO listed
    By azskeptic in forum Main Foreign Medical Schools Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-08-2011, 07:45 PM
  3. To current AUA students: Do ya like your school/experience so far?
    By davidMD in forum American University of Antigua (AUA)
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 03-07-2009, 11:37 PM
  4. Any current students who would rather have gone to D.O. school?
    By zearnold in forum St. Georges University School of Medicine
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-17-2006, 08:18 AM
  5. Question for current students at school.
    By OLDPRO in forum St. Christophers College of Medicine
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-12-2004, 08:54 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •