Sponsored Links
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    reyaz01 is offline Junior Member 510 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    33
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO SGU STUDENTS - VISA Issues

    Advertisements



    I have heard that many students of Trinidad and Tobago who opt to do their clinicals in the United States have been denied visas for entry on what many call it as "shaky grounds". Have trini citizens actually succeeded in getting a visa or are we all doomed?!
    Last edited by reyaz01; 09-05-2010 at 08:25 PM.

  2. #2
    kananaskis_girl's Avatar
    kananaskis_girl is offline Super Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    at the hospital.....
    Posts
    12,811
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    yes, all my T&T classmates were able to get visas and do their clinicals in the US....you should contact the school and the T&T government for more information and for any updates.
    SGU Forum Momma Hidden Content

    That's Doctor Evil to you....

  3. #3
    doctor95's Avatar
    doctor95 is offline Member 510 points
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    129
    Downloads
    1
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    There were issues with the term above mine and my term as well. Thats why most of them opted to go for UK rotations and others who already did have a B1 from before came to US for rotations.
    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    SGU SOM MS3 Hidden Content

  4. #4
    reyaz01 is offline Junior Member 510 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    33
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by doctor95 View Post
    There were issues with the term above mine and my term as well. Thats why most of them opted to go for UK rotations and others who already did have a B1 from before came to US for rotations.
    So, in other words - some students are going to have problems going to the US to do their rotations. For someone like me who wants to eventually practice in the US - this will cause a significant problem in terms of getting an H1B or J1 visa if I am to try for a Residency Position. I wonder why exactly there is a problem.

  5. #5
    invincibledoc13's Avatar
    invincibledoc13 is offline Senior Member 515 points
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY / GND
    Posts
    512
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Residency - Yes. Rotations - Not so much. B1/2 visas are pretty easy to come by, more so if you compare them to H1/J1 visas. The "problem" lies in the fact that it involves unnecessary paperwork for the program if the candidate requires a visa. Some programs are FMG friendly, they won't mind giving you a J-1. But an H-1 is pretty hard to get. You need very solid scores and basically need to show that you are the absolute best for the spot, then, maybe, the program would consider sponsoring the H-1. Another problem lies in the fact that for the H-1, the program needs to hire a lawyer and it just involves litigation costs of upto $1000-$1500. Why would a program go through all that trouble ? They might as well take an american citizen with slightly lower stats. As for the J-1, it's the candidate that does the running around and the program's involvement is minimal. BUT, after completion of residency on a J-1, the physician needs to get a J-1 waiver from his home country in order to stay and work in the US.

    Still, if you are competitive and the program is not, you have a chance.
    SGUSOM '14
    Step 1 [X] Step II CS [X] CK [X] Match 2014 [X]
    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great." - Mark Twain

  6. #6
    reyaz01 is offline Junior Member 510 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    33
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by invincibledoc13 View Post
    Residency - Yes. Rotations - Not so much. B1/2 visas are pretty easy to come by, more so if you compare them to H1/J1 visas. The "problem" lies in the fact that it involves unnecessary paperwork for the program if the candidate requires a visa. Some programs are FMG friendly, they won't mind giving you a J-1. But an H-1 is pretty hard to get. You need very solid scores and basically need to show that you are the absolute best for the spot, then, maybe, the program would consider sponsoring the H-1. Another problem lies in the fact that for the H-1, the program needs to hire a lawyer and it just involves litigation costs of upto $1000-$1500. Why would a program go through all that trouble ? They might as well take an american citizen with slightly lower stats. As for the J-1, it's the candidate that does the running around and the program's involvement is minimal. BUT, after completion of residency on a J-1, the physician needs to get a J-1 waiver from his home country in order to stay and work in the US.

    Still, if you are competitive and the program is not, you have a chance.
    I'm aware of the residency issues, however I was referring specifically to the B1/B2 Visa. Apparently, Trinidad and Tobago students are having trouble in securing one and the reason they gave in most instances was "not strong enough ties to home country". Apart from the fact that we have to return home to complete the Medical Degree and we're born here (with families & other responsibilities) I can't see why such a large amount of B1 visas are turned away.

  7. #7
    invincibledoc13's Avatar
    invincibledoc13 is offline Senior Member 515 points
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY / GND
    Posts
    512
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Every single person interviewed by the american embassy is considered a "potential immigrant, unless proven otherwise". That coming directly from one of the VOs. You need to have proof of bank statements, property ownership documents etc, it shouldn't be a problem then. However, i agree, these days, rejections have become more common.
    SGUSOM '14
    Step 1 [X] Step II CS [X] CK [X] Match 2014 [X]
    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great." - Mark Twain

  8. #8
    reyaz01 is offline Junior Member 510 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    33
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by invincibledoc13 View Post
    Every single person interviewed by the american embassy is considered a "potential immigrant, unless proven otherwise". That coming directly from one of the VOs. You need to have proof of bank statements, property ownership documents etc, it shouldn't be a problem then. However, i agree, these days, rejections have become more common.
    Well that's the thing, most students don't have jobs with regular salaries or own any properities and I don't suppose bank statements with accounts filled with "loan money" is going to help an application. So what CAN be used then? Because it is sort of unfair - their criteria I mean. Then again, thats life.

  9. #9
    Salama's Avatar
    Salama is offline Member Guru 8316 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Suppose you call me intern.
    Posts
    10,799
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    The US wants you to show strong ties to your home country, so you don't immigrate to the US (you are just there to get an education.) But, you want to do exactly that and work as a doctor in the US. And you want to know why the US is having problems with you not having strong ties to Trinidad? What part of that is unfair?
    Last edited by Salama; 09-06-2010 at 01:54 PM. Reason: Typo
    "I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul." ~W.E. Henley

  10. #10
    invincibledoc13's Avatar
    invincibledoc13 is offline Senior Member 515 points
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY / GND
    Posts
    512
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I agree. If they want you, they will take you. If they don't, we can't argue.
    SGUSOM '14
    Step 1 [X] Step II CS [X] CK [X] Match 2014 [X]
    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great." - Mark Twain

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. B-1 visa issues
    By RedBird in forum SGU Medical School Clinicals
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 08-07-2010, 01:42 PM
  2. Visa issues for Non-Canadian/U.S. students
    By kiwima in forum Medical University of the Americas (MUA) Nevis
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-02-2010, 12:49 PM
  3. Visa issues
    By Moldovanits in forum Medical University of Lublin
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-22-2009, 10:09 PM
  4. Visa issues for UK
    By rigglet in forum AUC Med School Clinicals
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-24-2009, 08:43 AM
  5. Medical School in Trinidad and Tobago
    By revelation in forum Main Foreign Medical Schools Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-04-2004, 09:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •