Sponsored Links
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
Like Tree3Likes

Thread: Prospective Student Need Help!

  1. #1
    Med333 is offline Newbie 510 points
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    2
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Prospective Student Need Help!

    Advertisements



    I'm considering apply to this school, but I have significant doubt about this school. I'm a Canadian citizen who can't work in EU or US at the moment.

    My main worry is about my career path after graduation. Basically, Canada shuts its door to most (90%+) foreign trained medical graduate, so thinking about coming back to Canada to work seems to be unrealistic. My only hope would be to find a residency match in the U.S. However, I heard that such position is extremely hard to find, given that I will be trained in Cyprus and don't a green card. I'm aware that I can apply to H1-B visa, but few hospitals are willing to sponsor this. I'm afraid that I will be either homeless, or working in a minimum-wage job with huge load of debt.

    Another of my concern is about the integrity of the school staff. They told be that there will be 50 clinical rotation spots in Chicago, but some posts indicate this is a lie and only 24 is available.

    However, there are some positive aspects about this school though: its link to St George's, the small class size...

    Given all the ups and downs, I really wonder if I should apply or not. Anyone who can share some insights will be greatly appreciated!!

  2. #2
    Ambazzador is offline Newbie 512 points
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I highly recommend you apply. The school, the curriculum and the program in general are definitely of very high standards. The degree is awarded by St. George’s, University of London which is now ranked in the top 200 Universities in the world.
    The path back to Canada can be via USA residency as you mentioned but you could also do a F1/F2 residency in Europe (GMC accredited residency program by obtaining a visa), write the Canadian exams and then return to Canada. It will be challenging but medicine and becoming a Doctor is overall challenging so this is just part of the journey.

    This year, the number of spots for clinical rotation in Chicago was increased to 35 and the school provides extra sessions for the USMLE. The school continues to make improvements and changes to ensure that the program grows. My experience has been very positive and St. George’s has over 250 years of excellent reputation therefore they are ensuring that their graduates are successful and make their journey back to the respective countries. Canada is very well represented in each cohort of which I am included and all indications points to returning to Canada and practicing.

    Feel free to ask more questions!
    Tipton likes this.

  3. #3
    Torontomed is offline Member 527 points
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    125
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ambazzador View Post
    I highly recommend you apply. The school, the curriculum and the program in general are definitely of very high standards. The degree is awarded by St. George’s, University of London which is now ranked in the top 200 Universities in the world.
    The path back to Canada can be via USA residency as you mentioned but you could also do a F1/F2 residency in Europe (GMC accredited residency program by obtaining a visa), write the Canadian exams and then return to Canada. It will be challenging but medicine and becoming a Doctor is overall challenging so this is just part of the journey.

    This year, the number of spots for clinical rotation in Chicago was increased to 35 and the school provides extra sessions for the USMLE. The school continues to make improvements and changes to ensure that the program grows. My experience has been very positive and St. George’s has over 250 years of excellent reputation therefore they are ensuring that their graduates are successful and make their journey back to the respective countries. Canada is very well represented in each cohort of which I am included and all indications points to returning to Canada and practicing.

    Feel free to ask more questions!
    Do you have any published data on # of students matched or got their FY1/FY2 spots?

  4. #4
    Torontomed is offline Member 527 points
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    125
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Med333 View Post
    I'm considering apply to this school, but I have significant doubt about this school. I'm a Canadian citizen who can't work in EU or US at the moment.

    My main worry is about my career path after graduation. Basically, Canada shuts its door to most (90%+) foreign trained medical graduate, so thinking about coming back to Canada to work seems to be unrealistic. My only hope would be to find a residency match in the U.S. However, I heard that such position is extremely hard to find, given that I will be trained in Cyprus and don't a green card. I'm aware that I can apply to H1-B visa, but few hospitals are willing to sponsor this. I'm afraid that I will be either homeless, or working in a minimum-wage job with huge load of debt.

    Another of my concern is about the integrity of the school staff. They told be that there will be 50 clinical rotation spots in Chicago, but some posts indicate this is a lie and only 24 is available.

    However, there are some positive aspects about this school though: its link to St George's, the small class size...

    Given all the ups and downs, I really wonder if I should apply or not. Anyone who can share some insights will be greatly appreciated!!
    Before you venture this option, consider that SGUL is not California (and it's affiliated ~9 states) and NY approved from my knowledge. NY approval is critical because it's the most IMG-friendly state. Cali approved is important as well because more and more states are following their model. Sure the school could get these approvals while you're enrolled but keep in mind that these are the most stringent approvals to get and many schools spend years trying to get them.

  5. #5
    Med333 is offline Newbie 510 points
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    2
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks everyone for your help.

  6. #6
    SGUL UNic Administration's Avatar
    SGUL UNic Administration is offline School Official 528 points
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    SGUL Univ of Nicosia Medical School
    Posts
    73
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Torontomed View Post
    Do you have any published data on # of students matched or got their FY1/FY2 spots?
    The cohort that graduated in May 2015 comprised 28 students, 27 of whom applied for F1 (and 1 applied for an Israeli internship). Of those 27:
    - 26 successful placements & 1 deferral
    - 5 Non UK/EEA Students - all successfully placed
    - 23 Students made the Primary list and 18 with their 1st choice
    - 1 Student offered an Academic Foundation Programme Place
    Tipton likes this.

  7. #7
    Torontomed is offline Member 527 points
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    125
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by SGUL UNic Administration View Post
    The cohort that graduated in May 2015 comprised 28 students, 27 of whom applied for F1 (and 1 applied for an Israeli internship). Of those 27:
    - 26 successful placements & 1 deferral
    - 5 Non UK/EEA Students - all successfully placed
    - 23 Students made the Primary list and 18 with their 1st choice
    - 1 Student offered an Academic Foundation Programme Place
    Thank you for this.
    Are those stats for the Nicosia campus or the London campus?
    Is the list posted anywhere on the website?

  8. #8
    SGUL UNic Administration's Avatar
    SGUL UNic Administration is offline School Official 528 points
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    SGUL Univ of Nicosia Medical School
    Posts
    73
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Torontomed View Post
    Thank you for this.
    Are those stats for the Nicosia campus or the London campus?
    Is the list posted anywhere on the website?
    You're welcome. These figures are for the SGUL programme delivered in Nicosia. We have not published them on our website but are happy to share them with students who inquire. If you'd like to know more about our programme, please email our admissions team: admissions[at]nicosia.sgul.ac.cy
    Tipton likes this.

  9. #9
    Ifnot is offline Newbie 510 points
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Med333 View Post
    I'm considering apply to this school, but I have significant doubt about this school. I'm a Canadian citizen who can't work in EU or US at the moment.

    My main worry is about my career path after graduation. Basically, Canada shuts its door to most (90%+) foreign trained medical graduate, so thinking about coming back to Canada to work seems to be unrealistic. My only hope would be to find a residency match in the U.S. However, I heard that such position is extremely hard to find, given that I will be trained in Cyprus and don't a green card. I'm aware that I can apply to H1-B visa, but few hospitals are willing to sponsor this. I'm afraid that I will be either homeless, or working in a minimum-wage job with huge load of debt.

    Another of my concern is about the integrity of the school staff. They told be that there will be 50 clinical rotation spots in Chicago, but some posts indicate this is a lie and only 24 is available.

    However, there are some positive aspects about this school though: its link to St George's, the small class size...

    Given all the ups and downs, I really wonder if I should apply or not. Anyone who can share some insights will be greatly appreciated!!
    This got a little long winded, but:
    I hope you got the answers you needed and went ahead and applied.

    I've applied, been accepted for 2016, accepted the invitation, and am now trying to decide on which site is my first choice for P and F years. Quickly.

    The information is all out there, and you can always contact people at the school for further information or clarification. So far I have not seen many posts regarding rotations beyond one flurry of what sounded like a few disgruntled US students complaining that they did not get the spot they wanted and accusing the administration and staff of lying to them. They were also speaking disparagingly of their peers and implying generalized intellectual inferiority, which does not reflect well upon them either when you stop to ponder it for just a moment. It seems to me that they may not have been using their critical reading skills and were seeing what they wanted to see written there. Nothing is guaranteed anywhere you go in the US, so why would they think it would be any different elsewhere? Even Harvard does not guarantee you will get your first choice in everything, pass all your classes, pass your licensing exams, and become a fabulous doctor. That is mostly up to the student. Read everything word for word. See exactly what is promised and what is not. If you think you see that something is implied, ask for clarification and specifics. I might be able to do up to 23 weeks of rotations in the US if I stay on Cyprus, but I might not and nobody is telling me otherwise. It would be nice to hear from students who are happy, or even neutral, about their 3rd and 4th years for a balanced view. I'm presuming they exist. If the students who DID get to Chicago aren't too busy learning the practice of medicine to weigh in, that would be lovely.

    So far as a residency in the US goes, I am a US citizen so I can only give the perspective from this side of the border. Residency slots are tight for *everyone* here, not just foreign grads. TPTB are working on increasing that number to meet demand, but there are a finite number of hospitals that are able to train residents. There is no guarantee that even US citizens will get their preferred, or any, residency placement on the first try. There is The Match, followed by The Scramble. I just completed a Master of Public Health degree at our local medical school, and have seen Match Day up close twice. It is a very stressful time for 4th years, even the excellent and confident ones.

    You might want to check into exactly what is meant by FMG in Canada, as it could be that those statistics you quoted are for foreign-born grads rather than Canadians who studied abroad. Call or email someone in a position to know (like the national licensure board) and ask them for clarification. You might find you've actually got some sort of fast-track that you didn't know was available to you. Canada still had friendly ties to the UK last I knew, and that may work in your favor.


    SGUL is a UK school, geared at UK and EU citizens. As a US citizen deciding to study outside my own country I am taking a chance that it will be much harder to come back to practice here. To my mind the advantages of the Nicosia program outweigh that. The fact that there are any options at all for me to do clinical rotations in the US, and that there are a few that are earmarked by the school for North American citizens is a bonus. The fact that there are a limited number of spaces available is just a fact of life in the US, because accredited teaching hospitals still need to fit US medical students in as well. Nicosia is still a relatively new program, and hopefully as cohorts pass through they will leave a good impression and generate an increased willingness by Admin to open up more spaces for SGUL students. I'm also a nurse. We gossip. Word travels when you've got good students on the floor or in the office/clinic, word travels faster when you've got bad ones. The docs hear what we say, then they in turn compare notes. The people who make decisions eventually hear about everything. If your program consistently sends good students, it is smiled upon.

    If I don't spend two solid years here, I can still most likely spend at least one or two rotations here and make the most of the time I've got to network and make myself favorably memorable. Try to remember that no matter where you end up for training, or where you do rotations, you are representing your school and impacting the students who come after you. Try to pay it forward when you can in the spirit of benevolence and dedication to the profession. If you're just worried about yourself and not considering future students, you may not be willing to consider others and go out of your way for others once you're practicing either. US hospitals and professional associations want to see that you're someone who is going to be to giving back to your community, your peers, and the future of Medicine generally.

    I haven't looked into the possibility of arranging a few elective rotations independently (with the program's blessing), but it's worth an ask.

    Between getting a Batch o Sci for prereqs and a graduate degree, I am already about $100,000 in the hole to the Federal Government for student loans, so I understand your financial concern completely. (That was at State University rates, not private school tuition.) However, you also have to realize that you still have options other than loading groceries for employment afterwards and can continue to try for residencies past the first year. (Unless Canada works very differently.) Over the past two years I took classes with several doctors from other nations with MD or equivalent degrees from their home countries, some of whom were practicing in the US, some of whom were trying to find a residency and pass the USMLE exams, others who were taking a different path with the intent to return home and practice there some day. Based on that small sample, I would say the outcome depends most heavily on the individual in question and the quality of their program.

    Ultimately I have made the decision that come hell or high water I am going to practice medicine somewhere in the world in this lifetime. If that's in the US, wonderful. If it's somewhere else, so be it. For me the most important part of becoming a doctor is becoming a doctor. I want to be a good doctor, a solid practitioner who can provide high quality healthcare to my patients. I'm not in it for the lifestyle, I'm in it for the job.. no matter what I end up doing or where I end up doing it. Period.

    I'm in, I'm going, I'm willing to work and study harder and smarter than I ever have before, and everything will work out however it works out. Nicosia is giving me a chance to study medicine, the rest is up to me.

    Good luck, and I hope to see you at orientation this year!
    Last edited by Ifnot; 12-26-2015 at 08:31 AM. Reason: Abbreviations bowdlerized erroneously by site: **, and *******.

  10. #10
    Aquietus Sullen is offline Newbie 510 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    12
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ambazzador View Post
    I highly recommend you apply. The school, the curriculum and the program in general are definitely of very high standards. The degree is awarded by St. George’s, University of London which is now ranked in the top 200 Universities in the world.
    The path back to Canada can be via USA residency as you mentioned but you could also do a F1/F2 residency in Europe (GMC accredited residency program by obtaining a visa), write the Canadian exams and then return to Canada. It will be challenging but medicine and becoming a Doctor is overall challenging so this is just part of the journey.

    This year, the number of spots for clinical rotation in Chicago was increased to 35 and the school provides extra sessions for the USMLE. The school continues to make improvements and changes to ensure that the program grows. My experience has been very positive and St. George’s has over 250 years of excellent reputation therefore they are ensuring that their graduates are successful and make their journey back to the respective countries. Canada is very well represented in each cohort of which I am included and all indications points to returning to Canada and practicing.

    Feel free to ask more questions!
    So are you saying that for example, a US citizen who is tired of the hassle about residency in the US and all the judgmental bias about being a IMG can just apply for a visa and go through the F1/F2? That sounds almost too good to be true. I would rather do that and then when its all said and done, return to work in the US after already being a professional in a certain field like Neurology. That would seem the most interesting path.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. prospective student
    By flesha in forum Trinity School of Medicine (TSOM)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-10-2011, 03:21 PM
  2. SMU prospective student
    By SPV123 in forum St. Martinus Medical School
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-10-2007, 07:56 PM
  3. prospective student
    By mkeb in forum Spartan Medical School
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-26-2007, 07:38 AM
  4. To a Prospective student
    By SonnySays in forum Spartan Medical School
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-14-2005, 01:42 AM
  5. Ross student responding to prospective student questions
    By gassan in forum Ross University School of Medicine
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-10-2004, 01:32 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •