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  1. #1
    shockandawe is offline Senior Member
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    No Spin Zone, Spartan Nobel Prize

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    I hope that in this section of this forum, we can refrain from personal attacks and we can look at the facts.

    I am holding in my hand a few articles concerning the 1999 Nobel Peace Prize. Out of respect for this Spartan physician, I will keep his name private. However, I would like to post a little of what was said about him.

    According to the articles on this Spartan physician:

    Article 1:

    "Physician is among those to be honored for Nobel Peace Prize... doctor will take a break from helping the needy around the world... to help pick up the Nobel Peace Prize."


    Article 2:

    "[name of spartan physician] will be among those in Oslo to recieve the Nobel Peace Prize being awarded to Doctors Without Borders."


    Article 3:

    "the Norwegian Nobel Committee invited [name of spartan doctor] among a few others to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for Doctors Without Borders."



    This Spartan graduate has also won all kinds of honors and awards, which I don't have the time to post. He has a very impressive resume. He completed his residency in the USA in Ob/Gyn and has completed a fellowship in Gyn/Onc. He worked around the world (Africa, China, Phillippines).

    I looked on the website where he currently works and here was the first few lines of his credentials:

    [name of spartan doctor]
    Nobel Peace Prize, Doctors Without Borders, 1999
    Fellowship in Gynecologic Oncology

  2. #2
    azskeptic's Avatar
    azskeptic is offline Moderator 666 points
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    No Spin Zone, Spartan Noble Prize

    Quote Originally Posted by shockandawe
    I hope that in this section of this forum, we can refrain from personal attacks and we can look at the facts.

    I am holding in my hand a few articles concerning the 1999 Noble Peace Prize. Out of respect for this Spartan physician, I will keep his name private. However, I would like to post a little of what was said about him.

    According to the articles on this Spartan physician:

    Article 1:

    "Physician is among those to be honored for Noble Peace Prize... doctor will take a break from helping the needy around the world... to help pick up the Noble Peace Prize."


    Article 2:

    "[name of spartan physician] will be among those in Oslo to recieve the Noble Peace Prize being awarded to Doctors Without Borders."


    Article 3:

    "the Norwegian Noble Committee invited [name of spartan doctor] among a few others to Oslo to receive the Noble Peace Prize for Doctors Without Borders."



    This Spartan graduate has also won all kinds of honors and awards, which I don't have the time to post. He has a very impressive resume. He completed his residency in the USA in Ob/Gyn and has completed a fellowship in Gyn/Onc. He worked around the world (Africa, China, Phillippines).

    I looked on the website where he currently works and here was the first few lines of his credentials:

    [name of spartan doctor]
    Noble Peace Prize, Doctors Without Borders, 1999
    Fellowship in Gynecologic Oncology
    Well, it isn't correct. The official list of winners doesn't list his name..only the organization.

    I am sure he is a great doctor from what has been written about him but things like Nobel Prizes and Pulitizers are awarded to organizations or individuals but being a part of the organization doesn't make YOU a Nobel Prize winner unless you show up on the Nobel site as the person awarded it.
    Moderator - State Licensing Forum

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  3. #3
    theprofessor is offline Junior Member
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    a lesson to all of us

    I know this physician.Exceptionally smart,traveled to over 35 countries,went to philipine and on his way stopped in Oslo for a day for the award then traveled again to do more medical care to the needy.AT that time he was chief resident in major USA institution ,that institution was supporting his efforts and knew about the award,he then went to fellowship,his felloship director,his medical school dean and friends,very few of his close friends knew about the Nobel prize,I recently learned about it and when we asked why not telling anyone the answer was" my main goal is helping others and awards comes later and the publicity I got is good for one thing "raise awarness about the importance for volunteering" .
    Traveling during your holidayds,weekends,and everytime you have chance to the most remote areas in the world,giving up comfort,family,and all the leisures in life is the most rewarding for us,
    I do work hard as a physician,I do lots of volunteering for the poor but I am so small and nothing compare to such outstanding doctors like "doctors without borders" A success of any organization relies on its people and only people.

  4. #4
    shockandawe is offline Senior Member
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    very ironic...

    I find it ironic, Azsceptic, how you believe all the newspapers which state this guy received a Noble Prize, all the institutions (some of them being the top institutions in the USA) who place Noble Peace Prize next to his name to be completely wrong but when one newspaper wrote half-truthes and lies about spartan, you didn't have anything to say...

    Here are the facts:

    1- Spartan grad along with few other doctors received Noble Peace Prize for Doctors Without Borders.

    2- All the newspapers confirm this.

    3- All the institutions (among the the best the USA) confirm this.

    4- Spartan Grad. has a big plaque in his office that says:
    His name, Noble Peace Prize, Doctors Without Borders, 1999

    Cheer up Azsceptic. This is excellent news. It's wonderful. This is not only good for spartan, it is good for all caribbean medical schools!!!!!!

  5. #5
    dt
    dt is offline Elite Member 510 points
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    Any idea when one of you fans can tell us who he is, or provide some links substantiating your claim?

    And may I suggest you send a few of these links/articles to the Courant reporter so that he can start saying good things about your school? Maybe he can do another article of your school? A positive one this time.

    Have anybody thought of inviting him to the ceremony that Spartan is planning?

    (And may I suggest that Spartan invite azskeptic too! )
    (And me too... all expense paid?)

  6. #6
    ZAATARI is offline Member
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    soon

    All the articles,media coverage,CBC,ABC,NBC news transcripts,presidential statements,and original newspapers ordered along with request of copies with the ceremony events,all will be send to school,all will be displayed on the walls when the official opening of new building events takes place.also all spartan alumni awards will be displayed at that time.Because of past bad experiences[when names put on this site some readers intentionally try to cause harm to people] I do not advise anyone to list any names or personal info.This is the best thing happened to the carribean schools since its start 1978[St.George was the first school started in Greneda].

  7. #7
    azskeptic's Avatar
    azskeptic is offline Moderator 666 points
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    very ironic...

    Quote Originally Posted by shockandawe
    I find it ironic, Azsceptic, how you believe all the newspapers which state this guy received a Noble Prize, all the institutions (some of them being the top institutions in the USA) who place Noble Peace Prize next to his name to be completely wrong but when one newspaper wrote half-truthes and lies about spartan, you didn't have anything to say...

    Here are the facts:

    1- Spartan grad along with few other doctors received Noble Peace Prize for Doctors Without Borders.

    2- All the newspapers confirm this.

    3- All the institutions (among the the best the USA) confirm this.

    4- Spartan Grad. has a big plaque in his office that says:
    His name, Noble Peace Prize, Doctors Without Borders, 1999

    Cheer up Azsceptic. This is excellent news. It's wonderful. This is not only good for spartan, it is good for all caribbean medical schools!!!!!!
    Don't believe me, believe the Nobel website see who they list as the winner

    http://www.nobel.se/peace/laureates/1999/index.html

    Where does it say Spartan or any doctors name?

    if it does it is a fake because MSF was awarded it. Contact Nobel to confirm before you go and embarrass your school or the doctor who has it.


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  8. #8
    dt
    dt is offline Elite Member 510 points
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    John McGill

    Here is what I found:

    http://universitycommunications.uvm..../boarders.html



    John McGill M'78, President of Doctors Without Borders, USA

    At 4:15 a.m. the telephone rang in Dr. John McGill’s Minneapolis home. He listened groggily to the caller from New York City. “Wake up,” the woman told him — he could hear her excitement — “we’ve won the Nobel Peace Prize!” McGill, a Burlington native and 1978 graduate of the UVM College of Medicine, is president of Doctors Without Borders, the U.S. branch of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). The 1999 Nobel Peace Prize went to the international organization for providing medical care in out-of-the-way places to victims of famines, wars, epidemics, and other catastrophes.
    Following that galvanizing wake-up call, McGill went off to his usual day’s work as a senior associate physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Hennepin County Medical Center. But it would be a day with another level of intensity layered upon the usual bustle of an emergency room. As he attended to the sick and hurt, McGill answered reporters’ questions, his office phone, cellular phone, and beeper perpetually buzzing with the sudden attention that comes with the Nobel Peace Prize.

    If a medical school were to develop a specialty path for training physicians to take on the strenuous, high-risk, selfless work of Doctors Without Borders, John McGill’s life would be a good place to start. The son of longtime UVM College of Medicine faculty member Bishop McGill, physical challenge – sailing, skiing, college football, windsufing – is a consistent theme in John McGill’s life.

    As a UVM medical student, McGill’s experience included work at clinics in Jamaica and Peru, where he learned to do without high-tech gear, working with just a patient’s history and a physical exam. “One of the great things about the University of Vermont was the emphasis on being with the patient, that contact is so important — we started our first year, grounding our medical practice and science in the patient,” he says.

    A world traveler at a young age, McGill began his medical career in Saudi Arabia in 1982. Soon, as war raged with the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, McGill’s long association with MSF would begin. Traveling through Afghanistan as a college student, McGill had been fascinated by the culture. With the country under assault and in turmoil, he wanted to help.

    Initially, MSF turned McGill down. The risk would be too great for him; the Soviets were hunting Americans. Recently they had ordered an Afghan village to turn over an American journalist, whom they wanted to parade as a CIA agent. Though the journalist had left the night before, the Soviets firebombed the town, killing three-hundred.

    But McGill persisted and eventually MSF offered him a brief mission, too brief for the Soviets to learn an American was in the country. Accepting the job, he would be the first American doctor to work with MSF.

    The MSF teams’s journey began in Peshawar, Pakistan, a city thick with KGB agents. Dressed as Afghans, McGill and a team of five others left at 3 a.m. in separate buses to enter Afganistan. Among the MSF personnel, Juliette Fournot, a young French woman heading Afghan operations. She and McGill would become life partners.

    “Alexander the Great had crossed the mountains, so there were some blond and blue-eyed Afghans,” McGill says. But since he spoke no Afghan languages, the American doctor, incognito with a turban on his head, kept his forehead pressed to the bus’s window, avoiding eye contact with the other passengers.

    The next morning they crossed the border into the arid, pine-dotted landscape, the iron-rich soil red. On the road to the province of Wardak, they encountered blown-out tanks, tracer bullets, smoking villages, and dead camels lying in the road machine-gunned by Soviet helicopters. They hunkered down underground to ride out shelling. They fled into the night at the approach of Soviet soldiers on a remote highway, McGill telling himself, “This could well be it, John.”

    Eventually, they made it to Wardak, motorcycled through the villages, and made plans for clinics.

    McGill and Fournot would team on another MSF mission in Afghanistan in 1986. Their route would take them across eighteen-thousand foot mountain passes and across the plains on a twenty-nine day, five-hundred mile journey. They set out with ninety donkeys and eleven horses that Fournot, an expert rider, had painstakingly selected at bazaars.

    “MSF’s greatest strength is logistics,” says McGill. “Most people think of the organization’s huge center in Bordeaux, which handles tons of medicine, and hundreds of Toyota jeeps, and cargo planes that can take off on a moment’s notice, but I think of Juliette buying all these donkeys and horses, secretly shipping them up to the border, and remembering details like two sets of horseshoes for each animal, and all the nails.”

    By the time they reached their destination, Badakhshan Province, McGill, lean to begin with, had lost twenty-three pounds. But the rigors of the trip paled compared to what they would find in the villages where ailing Afghans would walk three days to reach the clinic.

    Some villagers had up to one-hundred punctures from flying shrapnel, mud, stone, and splinters. In one shelled house an eight-year-old sat up, smiling. But when McGill pulled back the blanket, he saw a shrapnel wound in her lower back; she could not feel her legs. Under the primitive conditions, McGill worked to remove a patient’s injured eye, illuminating his surgery with a spelunker’s battery-powered headlamp.

    Amid the misery there were moments of hope. One night, guerilla fighters brought in a fourteen-year-old, his face torn apart by shrapnel. McGill worked on him for hours in a hut without electricity, extracting the bits of metal, putting flesh and bone back together. Months later, he learned the outcome of this impromptu operation: the boy had completely healed.

    McGill went on to serve in Pakistan, coordinating the medical efforts of all groups working inside Afghanistan. But eventually he returned to the emergency medicine he loves and his home in Minnesota, where Fournot joined him. The couple’s eight-year-old daughter speaks fluent French and English.

    McGill heads the U.S. section of Médecins Sans Frontières, which now has such branches in eighteen countries. The organization fields some two thousand volunteers, including about six hundred physicians, representing more than forty nationalities. U.S. volunteers currently number about 120. “It doesn’t seem like much for so large a country, but it’s harder to recruit in the U.S. because the average physician, just out of training, has a huge debt,” McGill says. Despite the numbers, he says, the U.S. branch is “a rising star.”

    “MSF will treat anyone in need, but in wars the vast majority of victims we treat are civilians,” says McGill, adding that volunteers also serve as witnesses, informing the world about massacres and other human rights violations.

    Many volunteers are physicians in transition, perhaps waiting to start a new position, who can donate a month or even a year. McGill says volunteers need not be athletes, and cites a surgeon in his seventies, former department chairs, as well as younger doctors as an example of physicians currently in the field. “We don’t want adventurers, or strict moralists,” he says.

    At first, winning the Nobel Prize seemed abstract to McGill. “Then I thought about the thousands of volunteers who have worked for people in need, and it brought tears to my eyes,” he says. McGill hopes the prize will attract more volunteers, particularly “good people” willing to take on a succession of missions, creating a cadre experienced at providing medical care in third-world catastrophes.

    McGill ticks off spots where MSF is currently active — Afghanistan, East Timor, Peru, southern Sudan…. “In Kosovo, we’re putting roofs on homes, which we see as preventative medicine — our guys are darned good at making things out of rubble,” he says. In Africa, MSF volunteers are coping with a vast AIDs and cholera epidemics. In the sub-Saharan region, meningococcal meningitis has infected several million people.

    On the board of Doctors Without Borders for ten years and president for four, McGill looks forward to eventually stepping down from his leadership role. Among his motivations, freeing the time to get back in the field, the desire that drew him to MSF initially.

    A year and a half ago, McGill visited an MSF station in Uganda. On that short visit he dealt with a cholera epidemic, victims of motorcycle and automobile accidents, kids with meningitis. As he bounced back to Kampala on a rough road, McGill thought, “I don’t think I should be leaving — I’d like to get back there.’”

    “You have to accept that much of the work is not glorious,” McGill says. “But we’ve seen people go out seeming young and come back confident — not boastful, humble even, but tested.” He adds that the French have an expression that describes the sensation of many returning volunteers: “You feel good in your skin.”

  9. #9
    dt
    dt is offline Elite Member 510 points
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    ..

    and this one...

    http://www.saem.org/newsltr/2000/nobel.htm


    Doctors Without Borders Wins Nobel Peace Prize


    John McGill Recognized for his Contribution


    Brian Zink, MD


    Chair, Nominating Committee



    The SAEM Nominating Committee and Board of Directors is pleased to announce a special tribute to Dr. John McGill. Dr. McGill will receive the SAEM Humanitarian Award at the Annual Meeting in San Francisco. Dr. McGill has served as President of Doctors Without Borders, and is an academic emergency physician at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis. Dr. McGill's selfless work throughout the world to provide medical care and comfort to people whose lives and health are disrupted by war and ethnic conflict has helped his organization earn the 2000 Nobel Peace Prize. The following summary of Dr. McGill's work was provided by his colleague from Hennepin County, Dr. Louis Ling.

    Residents know that when John McGill is attending, you better have a good reason for ordering a test or x-ray. John has learned that you can do a lot without very much.

    He had begun his career interested in travel, like many of us, backpacking around the world in college and doing rotations in Jamaica and Peru as a medical student at the University of Vermont. After his emergency medicine residency, John found himself working in Saudi Arabia. He heard about Medicins Sans Frontiers (MSF)/Doctors Without Borders in 1982, providing medical care to the mujadeen under Soviet attack in Afghanistan and flew to Paris to convince the group to let him go to Afghanistan. It was too dangerous because the Soviet's were hunting Americans and they did not want to take the risk. But, three years later, dressed as an Afghan, he was climbing through the mountains of Pakistan on a scouting mission, too brief for anyone to discover that an American was in the country. He had become the first American to work for MSF. In July 1986, John was back in Pakistan, waiting for the passes to open. After a month long, 500 mile trip up to passes at 18,000 feet, under constant threat of air attack, he was back in the mountains working with a team of Westerners and MSF trained Afghan nurses. He learned to operate under the light of spelunking headlamps, diagnosing and treating worms, as well as shrapnel and bullet wounds in children and adults. John eventually continued on, to coordinate the medical aid from all relief groups to Afghanistan before returning in November 1988 to a more sedate academic career at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis. But even back from the field, John continued to be active and after a US section was formed in 1990, served on the original Board of Directors, becoming President of Doctors Without Borders USA in 1996.

    From its humble beginnings in 1971, MSF today has offices in 18 countries and every year sends out medical supplies and 2000 volunteers, including 600 physicians, from 45 countries to over 70 countries. MSF has stayed true to its mission of caring for people with the greatest need during times of man-made and natural emergencies ignoring race, politics, or religion and bringing attention and help to those who need it. Recent missions list the crisis spots of the world: East Timor, Peru, Sudan, Kosovo, Uganda, Rawanda, Chechnya, Afghanistan and more.

    So when the phone rang at 4:15 am to inform John McGill, that MSF had won the 1999 Nobel Peace Prize, it all seemed very abstract at the time. "Then I thought about the thousands of volunteers who have worked for people in need and it brought tears to my eyes." John hopes the Nobel Prize will attract more support and more volunteers. If you are interested, write Doctors Without Borders USA, 11 East 26th Street, Suite 1904, New York, NY 10010.

    As for you and me, this may be the closest we ever get to a Nobel Peace Prize, unless of course you work first hand for MSF. But John McGill is a perfect example of how each of us should feel the inspiration and the need to work and to advocate for those patients who have the greatest need, no matter where they are and no matter what the barriers. Even when it seems we do not have much, we can do a lot.

  10. #10
    dt
    dt is offline Elite Member 510 points
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    James Orbinski

    accepted the prize. He is from McMaster University in Canada.

    http://www.mcmaster.ca/ua/alumni/gallery/ORBINSKI.htm


    ORBINSKI, JAMES
    M.D. 1989
    INDUCTED: 2001

    James Orbinski's medical career has taken him to countries ravaged by civil war, genocide, communicable disease outbreaks, and famine. His interest in international health developed during medical school when he spent 18 months in Rwanda providing clinical care and studying pediatric AIDS. This led him to work with the organization Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF).

    In 1991, Dr. Orbinski founding member of MSF Canada with fellow Alumni Gallery member Dr. Richard Heinzl. He was the medical coordinator for MSF, which took him to civil wars in Somalia, Rwanda, Afghanistan and Zaire. His work in humanitarian medical assistance has included the development and operation of outpatient clinics, field hospitals, emergency water and sanitation facilities, epidemiologic monitoring and vaccination programmes, and negotiation of temporary cease-fires for the transfer of patients. He was selected as the first non-European President of the MSF International Council in 1998, a role whose duties include managing humanitarian crises, overseeing humanitarian and medical policy, strategic planning, and providing political representation.

    In 1998, Dr. Orbinski received the Governor General's Meritorious Service Cross for his work as the MSF chef de mission to Rwanda during the 1994 civil war. In 1999, Dr. Orbinski accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of MSF for the humanitarian work of the organization around the world. Although his term as International President ended on December 31, 2000, Dr. Orbinski is still quite active with MSF and sits on MSF Canada's Board of Directors.
    Dr. Orbinski is also a believer in lifelong learning, having completed an MA in Political Science (International Relations) From the University of Toronto in 1998.

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