Sponsored Links
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Study tips????

  1. #1
    DonnieMD2B is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    59
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Study tips????

    Advertisements



    With all this talk about how difficult the classes are. I am going to start doing some light reading to get myself back into the groove of things. What do you recommend reading from clinically oriented anatomy and the best way to study anatomy in general. Also should i go ahead and get a jump start on Histology? I've determined that i should atleast read a little so please no replies about relaxing. I will do that once i'm there and get more comfortable. Plus its not like I'm going to try to stay a semester ahead of everything. So any recommendations will be greatly appreciated.
    -Donnie

  2. #2
    Ratan1982 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    63
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    i think it would be a good idea. i think so indeed
    Last edited by Ratan1982; 12-02-2007 at 11:53 AM.
    "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead"

  3. #3
    wolfvgang22 is offline Moderator 514 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,590
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    studying

    Quote Originally Posted by DonnieMD2B
    With all this talk about how difficult the classes are. I am going to start doing some light reading to get myself back into the groove of things. What do you recommend reading from clinically oriented anatomy and the best way to study anatomy in general. Also should i go ahead and get a jump start on Histology? I've determined that i should atleast read a little so please no replies about relaxing. I will do that once i'm there and get more comfortable. Plus its not like I'm going to try to stay a semester ahead of everything. So any recommendations will be greatly appreciated.
    -Donnie
    If you study anything, just memorize the chapter on lower limb and be able to draw the course of the arteries. Memorize what nerves innervate each muscle in the lower limb. Don't worry about Histology now, you'd probably just end up studying the wrong stuff anyway.
    In my own experience, nothing in undergrad really compared to med school, as med school requires way more memorization of minutia than undergrad did, and so far has required only a fraction of the critical thinking skills I learned in college. I agree, that the main thing you should focus on is getting good at managing your time so you can memorize a phone-books worth of material in a very short period of time, while staying in good spirits.
    Good luck,
    ~W
    Saba University School of Medicine, Class of 2009
    Diplomate, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

  4. #4
    plabon is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    73
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    i would recomend you not to read any of the text books. for histology just read every single page in the BRS. becasue most notes are right out of there, word for word. for anatomy, for lower limbs, do all the nerves, muscles, theri insertions and origins, and arteries and theri branches. but from what i have heard from ppl readig ahead does't help much. say you read ahead and complete the lwoe limb, that will e covers in 4-5 lectures here on the island. so its totaly yoru call. i spent my time before comign to saba on better things.good luck.

  5. #5
    rdecastro is offline Permanently Banned 510 points
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    multiple accounts
    Posts
    1,310
    Downloads
    10
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Ditto what he said. Moore's is essentially useless for the course, neither it nor the Grants Dissector are necessary. Netters, and a box of scalpel blades and a couple of boxes of gloves are. For histo, the BRS is good (it's good for anatomy, too), an atlas like Wheaters is good, Bloom and Fawcet sucks, Junquiera (which I've spent most of the day with) is actually pretty good.

    For anatomy, the nerves and arteries are key. It's all memorization, of 60 new things a day, every day, for 100 days. Welcome to medical school.

    For embryology (part of anatomy) Langemans is good but way too high yield, the BRS is supposed to be good. The text (Moore/Persaud) was a waste of money.

  6. #6
    bigkap87 is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    229
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I like Moore's clinical anatomy... it is very detailed yet sums up every topic with a clinical correlation, pictures, and a box of origins/insertions, etc... For me it has been very helpful, it keeps the anatomy reading bearable.
    "A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step." -Lao Tzu

  7. #7
    dreamdoc's Avatar
    dreamdoc is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    miami florida
    Posts
    86
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    What to study b4 you start

    I have to agree with Bigkap. Moores is a great book. I read it daily and it is a tremendous help! The amount of study time for these classes is INTENSE. However, I can tell you first hand that you will need alot of this info in the future during your rotations and in your practice when you finally finish, not to mention the USMLE's. I worked as a PA in orthopedic surgery for several years and I used the info from gross anatomy that I had taken in PA school all the time. The best tip that I think that has been over looked is that if you do study Moores or Netters instead of just MEMORIZING the BRS and the class notes, then you will be able to understand,visualize and orient yourself with the anatomy and then you can most likely figure out the origins, insertions, nerve supplies and actions of muscles in your head if you are caught in a pinch on the exam. Memorizing it is just short term and you just cannot memorize everything in gross anatomy. AT least I cant and Ive even had this class before. Its just too much information and detail. Dont worry about histology, its not that difficult, its just a lot of information to absorb while you are trying to figure out how you are going to learn all the gross anatomy being thrown at you. If you want to get a head start, the BRS in histology is basically the book we use in class and the profs lecture right out of it in that detail -youll need the first 4 chapters for the first block. Any head start you get will be of benefit when you get here and you will be glad you started early. I can tell you from first hand experience that when I took gross anatomy in the 90's in PA school, it was at a US medical school where the PA students were mixed with the med students and although the material was the same, Saba's class seems to be a lot more detail oriented and painful than I remember it being previously. The plus side is that the antomy instructors are the best instructors I have EVER had anywhere, you LEARN so much just sitting in class. They are so awesome that they present things in a matter that you walk out actually understanding!! Also. reading before class really helps in my opinion. Good luck!
    ACT AS IF ANYTHING YOU DESIRE IS ALREADY HERE!

  8. #8
    BTH's Avatar
    BTH
    BTH is offline Senior Member 510 points
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    762
    Downloads
    5
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Response.

    Salutations:

    Hey Plabon, nice to see you're finally answering a message. Haha.

    Anyways, back to the question regarding studying. I would suggest studying ahead before coming here. Unless you have been exposed to the subjects beforehand, and even so you may still find it tough to keep up with the pace, you may want to familiarize yourself with some terms and concepts. The pace here is fast. The way I would describe it is, get in, sit down, buckle up, and hold on tight because you'll be in for a rough ride. That's my opinion though. But one can certainly keep up with it as long as one puts in the necessary studying that is required. This of course varies by person. Don't be scared by what you hear though. Sure you have to put in hours of studying, but if you keep plugging away at it, you'll do fine. Good luck. Ciao.
    "To achieve success, you must first define success."

  9. #9
    Experienced's Avatar
    Experienced is offline Senior Member 510 points
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    506
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    What you need to pass

    Donnie,

    Two of the skills you get a chance to practice and polish during medical school are judgement and critical thinking. You just got your first lesson in both.

    Ratan and Wolf and bigkap and dreamdoc encourage you to read and study and learn as much as you can in medical school. A couple of others others give "tips" for how to cut corners and do as little as possible in your first semester classes. Which docs do you want standing next to you as you practice medicine? The ones who tell you that textbooks chosen by your professors are "useless"? The ones who think getting by doing only what will provide a passing mark is ok?

    My experience is that those who tell you to skip this and that and who provide other "tips" for cutting corners, won't be around by fifth semester. Some will transfer to Nevis while others will go home to pursue other career opportunities.

  10. #10
    BTH's Avatar
    BTH
    BTH is offline Senior Member 510 points
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    762
    Downloads
    5
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Response.

    Quote Originally Posted by Experienced
    Donnie,

    Two of the skills you get a chance to practice and polish during medical school are judgement and critical thinking. You just got your first lesson in both.

    Ratan and Wolf and bigkap and dreamdoc encourage you to read and study and learn as much as you can in medical school. A couple of others others give "tips" for how to cut corners and do as little as possible in your first semester classes. Which docs do you want standing next to you as you practice medicine? The ones who tell you that textbooks chosen by your professors are "useless"? The ones who think getting by doing only what will provide a passing mark is ok?

    My experience is that those who tell you to skip this and that and who provide other "tips" for cutting corners, won't be around by fifth semester. Some will transfer to Nevis while others will go home to pursue other career opportunities.
    Salutations:

    Hmmmmm, just to clarify, I did not encourage DonnieMD2BE to not read the textbooks. Buddy, I noticed you used the phrase "a couple of others give tips for how to cut corners". Since you stated that Ratan, Wolf, bigkap, and dreamdoc gave good advice, that leaves Plabon and I. I don't recall having told anyone to not read the textbook. In fact, I actually recall telling DonnieMD2BE to study ahead. Anyways, everyone is different. Their learning curve is different as well as their ability to grasp certain materials.

    DonnieMD2BE: you should study before coming down here. That's what I did. I actually read Clinically Oriented Anatomy. So you can study some and supplement it with the BRS for Anatomy. Keep in mind that in terms of reading the textbook, that would depend on your level of grasping the material. There are only so much time in the day to read the lecture notes, look over the powerpoint slides, go to lab, review Histology, read for Histology, etc. I try to read the textbook, but again, that depends on the amount of time I have or whether or not I can understand the material. Sometimes it takes a while to grasp certain things. Sure, reading the textbook should be undertaken, but that would depend on whether or not you have the time to do so. If you don't understand something, you can use the textbook to clarify it, ask the professor, ask someone who knows it, look at the lecture notes, etc.

    Bottom line. Don't cut corners. But use your time wisely. I agree that cutting corners is not great for the future. Good luck buddy. Ciao.
    "To achieve success, you must first define success."

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. study tips
    By docpaul in forum Medical University of the Americas (MUA) Nevis
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 04-24-2011, 01:25 AM
  2. Study tips
    By JerseyGirlDoc in forum Medical University of the Americas (MUA) Nevis
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-10-2009, 06:29 PM
  3. Study tips???
    By ag8416 in forum American University of the Caribbean (AUC)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-04-2006, 01:13 PM
  4. Study Tips
    By Asclepius1 in forum USMLE Step 1 Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-27-2004, 08:28 PM
  5. Study Tips :) Please add on to this~!!
    By missa in forum The Relaxing Lounge
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-12-2004, 05:18 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •