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  1. #1
    nbrian424 is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Studying tips to suceed at Ross

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    Anyone know any tips or studying habits that would help the new class of 06 do well would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
    finallydoc2b is offline Member 510 points
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    Read textbooks. Simple as that. Don't cheat with review books as your main source (use them the weekend before the sat.before the test and relax thereafter.) In the end you are only cheating yourself. You will obviously get more info than you actually need to earn an A in any class.... but who cares about their grades. Judge yourself based on what you know, NOT by the letter they give you. You will be shocked to see there is a difference between the two. An "A" at harvard is different that an "A" at Ross. A bit dramatic, but relevant nonetheless. Each class usually has one main "true" text book (ie not a review book.) Profs will even tell you NOT to read them... but rather use them as reference. Trust me... if you read texts like moore, guyton, and robbins, the profs notes are a review. People will say "you won't have time"... well make time... why else are you here. Or they say "it's not high yield," that phrase sucks! "High yield," although great for review purposes is by no means a way to gain a complete picture of basic sciences. Read the texts and you will rarely ever need to use med school's other dirty word... "memorize." (obviously there are some exceptions... micro and pharm names to name a few) Think of your topics as people, if you know the "personality" of the topic (ie what it does, why, how, where, etc..) then all that is left is giving a name to the person. Proof? I know of 3 other people that have read EVERY main text for each respective class... one guy earned a 246 on the step, myself and the other 2 (guy and a girl) earned RAW 94,94,96 respectively on the physio shelf. Read texts and do LOTS of questions DAILY! There are only a certain amount of ways to ask questions about a topic... do enough questions and they start to look familiar.
    my 2 cents
    Whether you think it is possible or impossible, you are right.

  3. #3
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    finallydoc2b is right!! and the main thing here is to LEARN so you can pass the Step... Otherwise it's not gonna matter if you had all A's and NO Step..
    Make time! you're here to STUDY. If you want to party everyday, then Medschool is not for you.. hey I'm not saying you're not gonna have a Kubuli now and then or even go to a post MINI party.. but every day.. hit those books and learn, because it's not about tests either, it's about actually learning something that might help another human being along the way....

  4. #4
    FoxTrot's Avatar
    FoxTrot is offline Senior Member
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    Some people might study well from textbooks while others (like myself) don't. I found it better for me to study directly from the packets and go over them multiple times and doing practice questions vs taking hours to read all the textbooks and probably forgetting 75% what you read a week later and then not having adequate time to cover the handouts. The handouts is what the professor bases most of the test q's anyways. Repetition is the key, especially with Pharmacology w/ all the drug MOA's and side effects and with the bugs with micro. The handouts have all the info you need.
    In 3rd and 4th semester, there is just not enough hours in the day to read Katzung, Moore microbiology, Robbins pathology and plus read Davidsons for ICM as well as having to go to PBL, hospital sessions, ICM group. Those books are really meant for reference anyways especially when you hit clinicals.
    I think it's bad advice for somebody to recommend a new student to read only textbooks since there is a time management issue. Unless they can read super fast and have great longterm memory, then they are just setting themselves up for failure. Most people that I saw fail out were those that didn't know how to study the right way. They could spend hours reading textbooks and doing this and that and would still fail the minis. Those people are mostly now at AUA or some other school that they transferred out to.



    Quote Originally Posted by finallydoc2b
    Read textbooks. Simple as that. Don't cheat with review books as your main source (use them the weekend before the sat.before the test and relax thereafter.) In the end you are only cheating yourself. You will obviously get more info than you actually need to earn an A in any class.... but who cares about their grades. Judge yourself based on what you know, NOT by the letter they give you. You will be shocked to see there is a difference between the two. An "A" at harvard is different that an "A" at Ross. A bit dramatic, but relevant nonetheless. Each class usually has one main "true" text book (ie not a review book.) Profs will even tell you NOT to read them... but rather use them as reference. Trust me... if you read texts like moore, guyton, and robbins, the profs notes are a review. People will say "you won't have time"... well make time... why else are you here. Or they say "it's not high yield," that phrase sucks! "High yield," although great for review purposes is by no means a way to gain a complete picture of basic sciences. Read the texts and you will rarely ever need to use med school's other dirty word... "memorize." (obviously there are some exceptions... micro and pharm names to name a few) Think of your topics as people, if you know the "personality" of the topic (ie what it does, why, how, where, etc..) then all that is left is giving a name to the person. Proof? I know of 3 other people that have read EVERY main text for each respective class... one guy earned a 246 on the step, myself and the other 2 (guy and a girl) earned RAW 94,94,96 respectively on the physio shelf. Read texts and do LOTS of questions DAILY! There are only a certain amount of ways to ask questions about a topic... do enough questions and they start to look familiar.
    my 2 cents
    Last edited by FoxTrot; 11-14-2005 at 10:46 PM.

  5. #5
    FoxTrot's Avatar
    FoxTrot is offline Senior Member
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    I think thats a bunch of **. I used alot of review books and passed semester 1-5 w/ good grades and did decent on Step 1 and I don't feel that I cheated myself. Can you explain how myself and others that are now past the basic sciences, that didn't primarily read the textbooks as the main source cheated ourselves?

    Quote Originally Posted by finallydoc2b
    Read textbooks. Simple as that. Don't cheat with review books as your main source (use them the weekend before the sat.before the test and relax thereafter.) In the end you are only cheating yourself.

  6. #6
    Naveenanirada's Avatar
    Naveenanirada is offline Permanently Banned
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    Ola Foxtrot
    I am at UCE which has a spanish curriculum and is markedly different from USMLE.And that´s why I can relate to time management.I study the UCE curriculum and then again for USMLE! by God, am I pressed for time!
    Pls advise what books you used for Basic sciences and how did you use them for learning the basics.I found that most review books are terribly condensed and are not good for learning the basics but good only for review , as they are meant to be.
    regards
    NN
    Last edited by Naveenanirada; 11-14-2005 at 10:43 PM.

  7. #7
    nbrian424 is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Thanks for all of your comments and tips. I really think that they are very valuable and that there is no right and wrong. It really depends on each individual. Some people pick up things easily through lectures and notes while others have to really dig in with textbooks to get the concept through. But again I really appreciate all of those who put in their great comments and excelent thoughts.

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    patel3284 is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    I think reading the textbook word by word is wasting time. A good way to study would be matching a professor's note topics with the textbook. This will help you understand certain topics better. Afterwards skim through the chapters and determine if certain topics were not thoroughly discussed by the professor that you might need to know for the USMLES. Then I would spend more time applying what you have studied to USMLE type questions. Personally I would outline the textbook chapters one week before we learned it in class and then match my outline with the professor's notes. This will help you learn things not covered in class and also help you figure what kind of questions the professor might ask on a test.

  9. #9
    sukhtinder is offline Senior Member
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    write alot of yoru own questions as well as doing alot of questions from review books, kaplan, etc. im a 3rd yr resident and i dont think ive ever read any textbooks, but then again i barely passed,,,
    Please un-ban Preppystud, Woodbridge, Bob2k, and Rajpatel, they were the most elite members of valueMD...sbturner is my heroHidden Content

  10. #10
    link626 is offline Senior Member 510 points
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    Many US med students do great on step 1 without ever cracking open a conventional textbook.

    reading the textbook is ok to get a holistic picture. But in the end, you need condensed notes. Either make your own, or use review books' outlines. It's just not a smart use of time to highlight textbooks and going back to read the text over and over.

    I've used different methods for different semesters. During my 1st semester, i used to read the textbooks and type my own outlines. I did good like that, and learned a lot. Then in 2nd semester, I started to use review books. they gave you just the basics, and I did decent.
    Then 3rd and 4th semester is a whole different story. It's just a bunch of time consuming crap. but i'll save this story for another time, since you're just a new student.

    One lesson I learned is that the notes are what gives you an A at Ross. Review books can guarantee at least a B usually. So use the review books mainly as a supplement to your class packets, and as a headstart for usmle prep.

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