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Thread: Starting in May.. sick with anxiety.

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    MDMSM is offline Newbie 512 points
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    Starting in May.. sick with anxiety.

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    I'm starting Ross in May and I'm scared absolutely sh--less. I'm losing sleep. I've read every blog I can find of student's experiences, and many recount that no matter how hard they studied, they still failed a semester and had to repeat. This program is my absolute last resort, and I am scared to death of failing out. I'm constantly wondering if I have what it takes to succeed and questioning if I have the skills. I know that many people don't make it past basic science. My undergrad stats were not impressive, 3.3~ GPA and ~24 MCAT. Everyone says that there is no point in studying before matriculating, so I have no idea how to prepare for the pooh poohstorm. Can I get by with hard work, or is there an IQ component that some people just don't have?

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    MSUSpartan2015 is offline Junior Member 515 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDMSM View Post
    I'm starting Ross in May and I'm scared absolutely sh--less. I'm losing sleep. I've read every blog I can find of student's experiences, and many recount that no matter how hard they studied, they still failed a semester and had to repeat. This program is my absolute last resort, and I am scared to death of failing out. I'm constantly wondering if I have what it takes to succeed and questioning if I have the skills. I know that many people don't make it past basic science. My undergrad stats were not impressive, 3.3~ GPA and ~24 MCAT. Everyone says that there is no point in studying before matriculating, so I have no idea how to prepare for the pooh poohstorm. Can I get by with hard work, or is there an IQ component that some people just don't have?
    I'm not a student at Ross (currently a 1st term at SGU) so I am not qualified to comment on the school but what I will say is that while medical school is hard, it is doable. For starters, you have the apptitude for the sciences or else you would not have gotten admitted. What I have discovered is that the information in the basic medical sciences is stuff that I have seen before as an undergrad microbiology major and graduate pharm/tox major. What is different, however, is the speed and volume that the information is presented. For example, in medical biochemistry, we have covered what you would cover in a semester-long undergraduate biochemistry course in seven weeks. Thus far, between our three courses (bichemistry, anatomy, cell biology/histology), we have covered about 105 lectures in these seven weeks (mid term exams start on the 7th and we have two more lectures worth of anatomy that will be on the exam). Thus, the keys to success are going to be 1) Time management 2) Learning how to study and retain the material and 3) Being able to switch things up if your study methods aren't working. I would also add that you are likely to hear hundreds of rumors from upper term students; some will be true but many will not be. So, sift thru the info and apply what you can. There are going to be tons of resources floating around and many will be useful to you; don't get caught in the trap of using too many however. You can waste a lot of time that way. If your school has an academic services office where they provide learning style assessments and study strategies, use that resource!!! Finally, monitor your time spent on social media; Facebook can really eat up valuable time.

    So yes, medical school is hard. Having a science apptitude is a great thing, but I have classmates who were muscians, lawyers, business men, and teachers. The thing that I see out of most everyone is that they want to be here and they are putting in work to achieve their goals. These last seven weeks have been the most difficult of my academic life. You will be behind in your lectures at times and may question yourself and why you are mentally flogging yourself. You are, however, not alone in this. I have a good supportive group of friends here and by God's grace and mercy, we are making it. You will too. Don't spend your free time trying to 'pre study'. Use that time to enjoy your last few free months enjoying yourself, family, and friends. I spent the last several months 'pre studying' and I found that 1) It didnt help much 2) I lost out on valuable 'me' time and 3) Most importantly, my fiancee was grieving over the loss of her mother on 27-August and I feel that I could have been much more of a comfort to her in the months leading up to my departure for Grenada. Enjoy yourself and don't worry. I hear good things about Ross (have a friend there now in her 2nd term and she loves it) and so long as you are willing to put in work, you will be fine.

    Best of luck to you.

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    MDMSM is offline Newbie 512 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSUSpartan2015 View Post
    I'm not a student at Ross (currently a 1st term at SGU) so I am not qualified to comment on the school but what I will say is that while medical school is hard, it is doable. For starters, you have the apptitude for the sciences or else you would not have gotten admitted. What I have discovered is that the information in the basic medical sciences is stuff that I have seen before as an undergrad microbiology major and graduate pharm/tox major. What is different, however, is the speed and volume that the information is presented. For example, in medical biochemistry, we have covered what you would cover in a semester-long undergraduate biochemistry course in seven weeks. Thus far, between our three courses (bichemistry, anatomy, cell biology/histology), we have covered about 105 lectures in these seven weeks (mid term exams start on the 7th and we have two more lectures worth of anatomy that will be on the exam). Thus, the keys to success are going to be 1) Time management 2) Learning how to study and retain the material and 3) Being able to switch things up if your study methods aren't working. I would also add that you are likely to hear hundreds of rumors from upper term students; some will be true but many will not be. So, sift thru the info and apply what you can. There are going to be tons of resources floating around and many will be useful to you; don't get caught in the trap of using too many however. You can waste a lot of time that way. If your school has an academic services office where they provide learning style assessments and study strategies, use that resource!!! Finally, monitor your time spent on social media; Facebook can really eat up valuable time.

    So yes, medical school is hard. Having a science apptitude is a great thing, but I have classmates who were muscians, lawyers, business men, and teachers. The thing that I see out of most everyone is that they want to be here and they are putting in work to achieve their goals. These last seven weeks have been the most difficult of my academic life. You will be behind in your lectures at times and may question yourself and why you are mentally flogging yourself. You are, however, not alone in this. I have a good supportive group of friends here and by God's grace and mercy, we are making it. You will too. Don't spend your free time trying to 'pre study'. Use that time to enjoy your last few free months enjoying yourself, family, and friends. I spent the last several months 'pre studying' and I found that 1) It didnt help much 2) I lost out on valuable 'me' time and 3) Most importantly, my fiancee was grieving over the loss of her mother on 27-August and I feel that I could have been much more of a comfort to her in the months leading up to my departure for Grenada. Enjoy yourself and don't worry. I hear good things about Ross (have a friend there now in her 2nd term and she loves it) and so long as you are willing to put in work, you will be fine.

    Best of luck to you.

    Thank you for the advice! It definitely has eased my anxiety a bit. I really hope you make it through SGU, I know their dismissal policy is crazy strict.

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    thxleave is offline Elite Member 7201 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDMSM View Post
    I'm starting Ross in May and I'm scared absolutely sh--less. I'm losing sleep. I've read every blog I can find of student's experiences, and many recount that no matter how hard they studied, they still failed a semester and had to repeat. This program is my absolute last resort, and I am scared to death of failing out. I'm constantly wondering if I have what it takes to succeed and questioning if I have the skills. I know that many people don't make it past basic science. My undergrad stats were not impressive, 3.3~ GPA and ~24 MCAT. Everyone says that there is no point in studying before matriculating, so I have no idea how to prepare for the pooh poohstorm. Can I get by with hard work, or is there an IQ component that some people just don't have?
    I say just don't go Ross, and retake MCAT for DO. Trust me on this. Eat up the deposit cost. Because it really isn't work it going to Carib these days.

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    Paleo2015 is offline Junior Member 518 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by thxleave View Post
    I say just don't go Ross, and retake MCAT for DO. Trust me on this. Eat up the deposit cost. Because it really isn't work it going to Carib these days.
    Nowadays the DO route is becoming more competitive,in my opinion a 3.3 GPA is not enough to get an acceptance . An outstanding MCAT score might do the trick.
    Ross student and I Matched !!!!

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    Xorthos is offline Junior Member 525 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDMSM View Post
    I'm starting Ross in May and I'm scared absolutely sh--less. I'm losing sleep. I've read every blog I can find of student's experiences, and many recount that no matter how hard they studied, they still failed a semester and had to repeat. This program is my absolute last resort, and I am scared to death of failing out. I'm constantly wondering if I have what it takes to succeed and questioning if I have the skills. I know that many people don't make it past basic science. My undergrad stats were not impressive, 3.3~ GPA and ~24 MCAT. Everyone says that there is no point in studying before matriculating, so I have no idea how to prepare for the pooh poohstorm. Can I get by with hard work, or is there an IQ component that some people just don't have?
    I think the most important part of med school is time management. Yes, there is an intelligence component, and some questions will test your reasoning and understanding (just like the USMLE). But I've seen people with worse MCATS and worse GPA's succeed at Ross than people who were very intelligent. My scores were similar to yours (MCAT slightly higher), but I did very well at Ross (3.72 GPA) and on my Steps.

    I knew people who made A's with 8 hours of studying a day. (I personally studied around 10 hours a day). But I also saw people complain that they studied 16 hours a day and still failed. But if you watch these people, probably 12 out of their 16 hours a day is spent playing around on the internet or watching movies while they sit in front of a book and their computer. Just sitting next to an open book is not considered studying. A lot of people who complain need to realize that.

    Nobody will tell you that going to a Caribbean school over a US DO school is preferential, but I disagree with Thxleave. The big 3 still have very good match rates, and I wouldn't let someone scare you away from your dream. I've had numerous residencies on the interview trail say that they have very good experience with Ross, and love having their students as residents. I don't regret going to Ross one bit....except for the massive student loan
    Paleo2015 and MDMSM like this.

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    MSUSpartan2015 is offline Junior Member 515 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDMSM View Post
    Thank you for the advice! It definitely has eased my anxiety a bit. I really hope you make it through SGU, I know their dismissal policy is crazy strict.

    Thank you. SGU does have a strict dismissal policy but that comes AFTER a student has been given options to rectify their issues (deceling or LoA). Ultimately, I believe that your success is in your hands. Work hard, and you will be a physician. See you on the other side. ☺

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    realisticONE is offline Newbie 514 points
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    Very much doable

    Quote Originally Posted by MDMSM View Post
    I'm starting Ross in May and I'm scared absolutely sh--less. I'm losing sleep. I've read every blog I can find of student's experiences, and many recount that no matter how hard they studied, they still failed a semester and had to repeat. This program is my absolute last resort, and I am scared to death of failing out. I'm constantly wondering if I have what it takes to succeed and questioning if I have the skills. I know that many people don't make it past basic science. My undergrad stats were not impressive, 3.3~ GPA and ~24 MCAT. Everyone says that there is no point in studying before matriculating, so I have no idea how to prepare for the pooh poohstorm. Can I get by with hard work, or is there an IQ component that some people just don't have?
    I am in my 4th (and hopefully last) semester on the island. Is it difficult: Yes, but is it doable: Very much so. Most of the students I started with are still here and doing well. The key is to find a way to learn and understand the material as quickly and best as possible. Personally, I prefer medical school over undergrad, but also I am studying and making it fun. Don't worry too much about, just come ready learn and do well. Can always message me questions.
    frank29, Paleo2015 and MDMSM like this.

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    shahzam1 is offline Newbie 512 points
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    Hey everyone,
    Like many prospective students here I wanted to know my chances or getting into Ross (May 2016, Submitted all documents last Thursday)? Also, how likely it is that I will be MERP'd? I understand that I am applying 2 months before the semester begins, so can anyone with experience tell whether or not the class is generally full by now?
    Heres a little bit about me:
    I have just recently graduated from UCSD at age 21 (finished in 3 years). I took some time to travel to Europe and then took my MCAT. I scored a mediocre 500 (first time taking it). My cum GPA is 3.03 and my science GPA is lower (probably 2.65). The reason for my low GPA is that during my second year I became depressed and my academic performance was affected. The courses that are holding my GPA back are Ochem (quarter 1 :B quarter 2: c+ quarter 3: c- and lab: c) I learned to better manage my emotions and eventually got through the problems that were distracting me. Then I took biochemistry and got A's.
    I only have 2 letters of recommendations (one from Biochem Prof. and one from DO) . I have applied for May 2016. Here's some further information I feel I should add. I have taken courses such as medical microbiology, human physiology, metabolic biochem, structural biochem, endocrinology, Clinical psych, genetics and earned A's and B's.
    I have 1 year clinical research experience, 4 years of volunteering at a hospital, Eagle Scout, Tutor, advisor for students at my school.

    Thank-you in Advance
    Last edited by shahzam1; 03-06-2016 at 12:10 AM.

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    MSUSpartan2015 is offline Junior Member 515 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by shahzam1 View Post
    Hey everyone,
    Like many prospective students here I wanted to know my chances or getting into Ross (May 2016, Submitted all documents last Thursday)? Also, how likely it is that I will be MERP'd? I understand that I am applying 2 months before the semester begins, so can anyone with experience tell whether or not the class is generally full by now?
    Heres a little bit about me:
    I have just recently graduated from UCSD at age 21 (finished in 3 years). I took some time to travel to Europe and then took my MCAT. I scored a mediocre 500 (first time taking it). My cum GPA is 3.03 and my science GPA is lower (probably 2.65). The reason for my low GPA is that during my second year I became depressed and my academic performance was affected. The courses that are holding my GPA back are Ochem (quarter 1 :B quarter 2: c+ quarter 3: c- and lab: c) I learned to better manage my emotions and eventually got through the problems that were distracting me. Then I took biochemistry and got A's.
    I only have 2 letters of recommendations (one from Biochem Prof. and one from DO) . I have applied for May 2016. Here's some further information I feel I should add. I have taken courses such as medical microbiology, human physiology, metabolic biochem, structural biochem, endocrinology, Clinical psych, genetics and earned A's and B's.
    I have 1 year clinical research experience, 4 years of volunteering at a hospital, Eagle Scout, Tutor, advisor for students at my school.

    Thank-you in Advance
    Just my two cents: Attend a post bac or retake some of the class s that you didnt do so well in. Retake the MCAT, gain some more experiences that will help you to gain some new and strong letters of rec / extracurriculars. Apply to some US MD and DO programs. If, after exhausting that option, you would still consider the Caribbean, then apply to Ross. At 21, you should not feel rushed to start medical school now. Do this the right way.

    I was admitted to AUC's MERP program last year (didn't attend as I ended up getting into SGU) and have several friends who have gone through the program and matriculated to AUC and Ross. The program is doable, but its by no means 'easy' and if you don't do well, you have likely ended your chance to get into medical school. I have a friend in the MERP-Ross track now: she scored a 498 on the new MCAT (2nd attempt) and had an undergraduate degree in MCB with an overall GPA of 3.12 and a science GPA of 2.78. She didn't have a lot in the way of healthcare volunteer or extracurricular experience, but she has a very interesting life story. She has struggled in the programand as of last week, she told me that she needs damn near perfect scores on the last of her 'mini's' to have a shot at going on to Ross. Before she left for MERP, she and I talked about it and I was of the opinion that she had/has some issues (personal and study-skill related) that needed to be worked out before starting a post bac or medical school. Those issues caught up to her and now she is in danger of this dream coming to an end.

    So, to recap, take your time about making this decision. I'm 44 years old and had applied to medical school twice before and took the MCAT twice (along with finishing a masters degree and enhancing my LoR's and gaining some additional extracurricular experiences). Unfortunatley, things didn't work out for me to get into a U.S. school, so I came here to SGU. I also have a few friends at Ross, one at AUC, and one at Saba. if you spoke with any of them, they would tell you the same. I am VERY appreciative that SGU is giving me a chance to pursue my dream. However, there are HUGE risks associated with attending an offshore school (they are well discussed and you can find lots on these threads about the topic) and I realize that I have VERY little margin for error. If I had a chance to attend a U.S. school, I would do so. Take your time about this. At 21, you have more than enough time to make a well-thought out, wise decision that will give you the most options and the easiest, most efficient path to reach your goals.

    No matter what you decide, I wish you the best.

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