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  1. #1
    canal is offline Member 510 points
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    stress during clinicals

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    I am doing an elective that is about 9-10 hours/day with very little time for lunch. My attending is tough and demanding. I guess you can say I am learning more--scut work mostly. I am always stress and anxious. I feel like the attending expects me to know everything and anything...compared to my peers in the same elective I have only done one other core while they are practically done with their clinical years. This doesn't matter, I am expected to know/do things equal to the "veteran" students. I am triyng sooo hard..getting in very early...leaving late...assisting other doctors...writing good notes...I just don't know everything about medicine. I am intimidated, humiliated, sooo anxious all the time...the right side of my chest has been feeling this dull pain...am I the only one?

  2. #2
    thethom is offline Senior Member 517 points
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    LOL those hours sound pretty easy to me. That is how residency will be so you should be glad that you are being exposed to the pressures early. Also I commend your attending, most medical students (carib students especially), unless pushed, will be mediocre at best. Work your BUTT off, learn as MUCH as you can, and when the rotation is over you will be glad he was so hard on you because it made you a better doctor. What rotation is it if you don't mind me asking? My first rotation was Kings County IM, I don't know if you've heard about that rotation, but I swear by it, all the late nights on call, tongue whippings, and hair pulling stress was worth it, and I feel like I was a star in the rest of my rotations because of it.

    Don't give up, hang in there..!

    -T
    M.D. RUSM c/o 2009.
    Step 1: 260/99, Step 2CK: 236/98, Step 3: 244/99.
    Family Medicine Residency 2009-2012, Board Certified.
    Sports Medicine Fellowship 20012-2013, Board Certified.
    Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine, UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine.
    Currently in private Primary Care Sports Medicine Practice.

  3. #3
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    sarahtarah is offline Senior Member 511 points
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    i havent gotten to rotations yet, but i would think that what thethom said is legit.

    just remember to not take it personally, your attending is most likely trying to help you improve yourself, and sometimes that comes with a little verbal abuse. keep doing the best you can and remember, the rotation will end soon!
    If you want to do something, then you will find a way.
    If you want to do nothing, then you will find an excuse.

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  4. #4
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    TennisMan is offline Member 526 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by canal View Post
    I am doing an elective that is about 9-10 hours/day with very little time for lunch. My attending is tough and demanding. I guess you can say I am learning more--scut work mostly. I am always stress and anxious. I feel like the attending expects me to know everything and anything...compared to my peers in the same elective I have only done one other core while they are practically done with their clinical years. This doesn't matter, I am expected to know/do things equal to the "veteran" students. I am triyng sooo hard..getting in very early...leaving late...assisting other doctors...writing good notes...I just don't know everything about medicine. I am intimidated, humiliated, sooo anxious all the time...the right side of my chest has been feeling this dull pain...am I the only one?

    This is a totally normal feeling, especially if this is only your second rotation. You will always run into a few attendings who are malignant or demanding at various points in your training. Just do the best you can and don't let it get to you. What really helped me out was reading a few books on differential diagnosis (eg. Differential Diagnosis of Common Complaints by Seller or Internal Medicine Clerkship Guide by Paauw). These will guide you toward tailoring your H&Ps and workups based on the patient's chief complaint. A lot of textbooks are oriented on the basis of a known diagnosis. This is ok but patients usually don't present and tell you the diagnosis unless they were already diagnosed in the past. If you are new on the wards/clinic, just getting to the diagnosis is challenging so you will need a resource that will help guide your mind on the toward establishing a nice differential list. It has been my experience thus far that attendings like to see med students come up with a nice list of possibilities and how you would rule these in or out using labs, ancillary studies like radiologic studies, or clinical exam alone. It shows that you are thinking. Once you get the Dx, just look up the current treatment on Up to Date or accessmedicine (Ross gave us the password for this).

    Lastly, if you've done only 1 core and are doing an elective, usually the expectation of a med student on an elective is higher because it is assumed that you have had an X amount of cores already. This is why your attending is maybe expecting you to perform at the level of your peers who are on the same rotation as you. Most electives assume that you have a core foundation already. I know Ross allows us to enroll into some electives with minimal or no cores, but if you need to do this, choose the elective that does not need much core background. As an example, I have some friends who started out with emergency medicine as their first rotation which is not good. They were lost and for ER you should at least have IM and peds core done at the bare minimum.
    Last edited by TennisMan; 11-30-2008 at 03:30 PM.
    Ross Univ Class of 2010 (X)
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  5. #5
    canal is offline Member 510 points
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    thanks tennisman, I am not afraid of hard work, long hours...etc. I have only had psych core..this is my second rotation iand first elective in anest. which I thought would not be so bad...I was dead wrong. I am expected to do a presentation once a week and from what I have heard, there will also be a final which would be very difficult. I just feel that the attending is expecting me to know more than I do. He gets agitated with my lack of experience...how do I help that? To make matters worst, I don't think he cares that in comparison to my peers who like I have said have had far more cores/electives, I am trying hard but I get the feeling that I am expected to perform with equal competence as them...I am afraid of failing at worst. An hour feels like a week. I just don't want to feel like an imbecile. Like I have said, I am there before anyone is and leave late after everyone else. I read, I do my scut work. I just don't want to feel this horrible chronic anxiety/stress...thats all.

  6. #6
    thethom is offline Senior Member 517 points
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    Its not just Ross that does this, it is very common for US schools to place students in electives before they have finished their cores. I am rotating at UNC hospitals and their medical students commonly do electives in their 3rd year, before finishing all cores.
    M.D. RUSM c/o 2009.
    Step 1: 260/99, Step 2CK: 236/98, Step 3: 244/99.
    Family Medicine Residency 2009-2012, Board Certified.
    Sports Medicine Fellowship 20012-2013, Board Certified.
    Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine, UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine.
    Currently in private Primary Care Sports Medicine Practice.

  7. #7
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    AUCMD2006 is offline Ultimate Member 6129 points
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    thats what intern year feels like...lunch hour? whyats that..it is a good experience and will make you better like others said. some rotations are easy some are not so suck it up and deal with it all you can do is try.

    and to thetom..don't know what US students you rotated with but i teach at a US med school and they are as big slackers as the worse carib stud..worse yet becaise some come with an additional sense of entitlement where as carib students you can allways brinbg back to earth by reminding them of the school...hehe
    AUCMD2006
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  8. #8
    TennisMan's Avatar
    TennisMan is offline Member 526 points
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    Canal, may I ask you where you are doing anesthesiology at?
    Ross Univ Class of 2010 (X)
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    Matched and Finished Residency in California (X) Hidden Content Hidden Content Hidden Content
    CURRENT STATUS: Board Certified Family Medicine in California - Working as Hospitalist

  9. #9
    LadyTMD is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    "the right side of my chest has been feeling this dull pain..."
    canal,
    Don't overlook that. I'm surprised no one else on here in the profession has commented on this. You don't want to kill yourself or wind up with a stroke and then ask yourself was it really worth it? Take good care..

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