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  1. #1
    drake_stallion is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    is Getting a General Medicine degree in Romanian better than the

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    is Getting a General Medicine degree in Romanian better than the english one...OR IS IT JUST A WASTE OF TIME LEARNING LANGUAGE ,well im aged 19..and i would appreciate anyone's advice on how to frame things up as im confused in choosing the english or the romanian programe

  2. #2
    devildoc8404's Avatar
    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    It depends on a variety of factors, including where you want to practice. If you want to try to work in the US, then it is wise to earn the degree in Romanian, as those programs have 50-state approval in the US. None of the English programs in Romania have approval in California and a list of several other states.

    Additionally, most E-EU schools tend to offer better medical educations and favorable academic conditions to the students in their native language courses. In the English courses you are often viewed as "less-than" and treated, to varying degrees, rather poorly. You also usually pay more (for less).

    Finally, learning another language is rarely "a waste of time," in my experience.

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    blue... I use red
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    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


  3. #3
    drake_stallion is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by devildoc8404 View Post
    It depends on a variety of factors, including where you want to practice. If you want to try to work in the US, then it is wise to earn the degree in Romanian, as those programs have 50-state approval in the US. None of the English programs in Romania have approval in California and a list of several other states.

    Additionally, most E-EU schools tend to offer better medical educations and favorable academic conditions to the students in their native language courses. In the English courses you are often viewed as "less-than" and treated, to varying degrees, rather poorly. You also usually pay more (for less).

    Finally, learning another language is rarely "a waste of time," in my experience.
    devildoc thanks for the advice man..that was really helpful as i checked out more and the program looks really good and better in romanian so ive decided to take that extra leap and get the romanian degree..im a non-eu and well i was actually considering switzerland or germany for practice,since i know A1 german and part of swiss speaks german too..

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    devildoc8404's Avatar
    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    If you want to work in the EU, at least from the acceptance of the diploma, it does not matter whether you study in Romanian or English. Both are considered EU degrees. Germany is currently hiring (no idea how things will be in 6 years, of course), assuming you speak at least B2-level German and can jump through the necessary hoops. With the quality of training generally being better in the native language programs, though, I would say that your plan is a good one. I know a couple of Germans studying in Romania who plan to return to Germany when they graduate, and one of my classmates from Bulgaria is working there now.

    I work in Switzerland, and you currently need German fluency (C1-C2) and some good luck to get a position here as a non-EU foreigner... even with an EU medical diploma. It is probably one of the best places in the world to get specialization training, though, considering the high quality of hospitals, the good pay, the (comparatively) reasonable hours, the living standard, etc. You are right, the biggest linguistic region of Switzerland is the German region, followed by French, then Italian, then Romansch. Anyway, you will need to become really fluent and make the right contacts in order to make something happen in a Swiss program, it is very competitive. I was incredibly fortunate.

    Good luck to you.

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
    ."
    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


  5. #5
    drake_stallion is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by devildoc8404 View Post
    If you want to work in the EU, at least from the acceptance of the diploma, it does not matter whether you study in Romanian or English. Both are considered EU degrees. Germany is currently hiring (no idea how things will be in 6 years, of course), assuming you speak at least B2-level German and can jump through the necessary hoops. With the quality of training generally being better in the native language programs, though, I would say that your plan is a good one. I know a couple of Germans studying in Romania who plan to return to Germany when they graduate, and one of my classmates from Bulgaria is working there now.

    I work in Switzerland, and you currently need German fluency (C1-C2) and some good luck to get a position here as a non-EU foreigner... even with an EU medical diploma. It is probably one of the best places in the world to get specialization training, though, considering the high quality of hospitals, the good pay, the (comparatively) reasonable hours, the living standard, etc. You are right, the biggest linguistic region of Switzerland is the German region, followed by French, then Italian, then Romansch. Anyway, you will need to become really fluent and make the right contacts in order to make something happen in a Swiss program, it is very competitive. I was incredibly fortunate.

    Good luck to you.
    devildoc you have no idea how much you helped me with information man,and since i know this even before med school im gonna start german classes on weekends and ima make sure i know german to the best by 6/7 years i would be 26 by then..and well about the romanian or english degree well i am going in for the romanian one cause it would develop more doctor-patient abilities as well as better quality education in romania..i guess its WORTH IT!!thanks man!!and id surely keep posting my experiences along the way ...

  6. #6
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    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    Happy to be of help, and I wish you well in your medical studies. Take them very seriously, and do not get pulled away from your learning opportunities by the students who do not. You will find in E-EU that student quality often runs the gamut from excellent to pretty freaking terrible.

    You might also seek out some summer opportunities as an Unterassistent in Germany (or Switzerland, or Austria) when you enter the clinical years of your studies. If you can make a positive impression on the decision-makers at a hospital while still in medical school, it could lead to a position right after graduation, which is the best option to have.

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
    ."
    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


  7. #7
    drake_stallion is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by devildoc8404 View Post
    Happy to be of help, and I wish you well in your medical studies. Take them very seriously, and do not get pulled away from your learning opportunities by the students who do not. You will find in E-EU that student quality often runs the gamut from excellent to pretty freaking terrible.

    You might also seek out some summer opportunities as an Unterassistent in Germany (or Switzerland, or Austria) when you enter the clinical years of your studies. If you can make a positive impression on the decision-makers at a hospital while still in medical school, it could lead to a position right after graduation, which is the best option to have.
    by clinical years you mean from 3rd year..and yea man possibly switz or berlin would be my options to do that,and im taking your advice quite seriously man..i know and understand now i mean i have a clear picture before-hand on how to deal with romania ..thanks alot for every advice again man..
    bye for now..you totally cleared my mind actually..see you

  8. #8
    drake_stallion is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by devildoc8404 View Post
    Happy to be of help, and I wish you well in your medical studies. Take them very seriously, and do not get pulled away from your learning opportunities by the students who do not. You will find in E-EU that student quality often runs the gamut from excellent to pretty freaking terrible.

    You might also seek out some summer opportunities as an Unterassistent in Germany (or Switzerland, or Austria) when you enter the clinical years of your studies. If you can make a positive impression on the decision-makers at a hospital while still in medical school, it could lead to a position right after graduation, which is the best option to have.
    by clinical years you mean from 3rd year..and yea man possibly switz or berlin would be my options to do that,and im taking your advice quite seriously man..i know and understand now i mean i have a clear picture before-hand on how to deal with romania ..thanks alot for every advice again man..
    bye for now..you totally cleared my mind actually..see you

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