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  1. #1
    Wortkonig is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Advantages and Disadvantages about studying medicine in Romania...

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    Hey Guys, I'm planning to study medicine in Romania( especially in UMF CLUJ or C. Davilla). And im planning to study my residency and live in US, Canada or any other western European country. I've never been to Romania but i know its not a wealthy country and my only fear is not to be accepted in any other country.I know its a member of the EU and my Diploma will be accepted in any other eu member country but what i want to say is when i go to a job interview i dont want to hear " Well i can see that you were great a student with lots of knowladge but we will hire the guy from Italy." If i experience something like this only because im graduated from RO it will be a big big dissapointment for me.

  2. #2
    devildoc8404's Avatar
    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    This will, to some degree, depend on the kinds of jobs you are seeking in the EU... Not to mention what the job market looks like in the EU six years from now, which nobody can likely predict with complete accuracy based on available EU information. The predictions from the AAMC for residency prospects, however, are pretty sobering.

    EU:
    Currently, if you want to get a competitive job at a high-powered academic hospital in W-EU, then Romania (or much of the rest of E-EU) is probably a poor idea -- it certainly will not help your cause if the other applicants are from more reputed programs. The hot-snot EU universities will tend to want to look at applicants with the hottest-snot CVs, just like anyplace else. (Romania and most of her neighbors are decidedly lukewarm-snot.) However, if you just want a decent position SOMEPLACE, then it is not going to matter as much... More emphasis will be placed on your language skills for the country you are considering, as well as the type of applicant that you are. Again, though, this is how things are RIGHT NOW, and there is little information and no guarantee for how things will roll in the EU in six years' time.. Depending on the country, your citizenship could play a significant role in job availability, as well, because that is already the case in many EU/EEA countries.

    NA:
    On the other hand, if you genuinely want to return to North America, according to data from the AAMC your window is rapidly closing. Six years from now, if the projections are correct, we IMG/FMGs will be extremely unlikely to get many residency training positions in the US at all. Within four years from now, they anticipate graduating roughly one US grad for every internship position, which would certainly leave the foreign grads up a creek. No idea on the projections for Canada, but it is not easy there already.

    If I was starting med school now, and I wanted to work in NA, I would be seriously tempted not look overseas at all. Rather, I would exhaust every single opportunity, both MD and DO, in the US first... or else consider programs in the UK or Ireland, perhaps, but even those places are likely to have troubles after 2016.

    This is not set in stone, but it is totally based on the AAMC's own projections, so it is more than a little scary.

    I would suggest that you do a lot of research before you commit to something like medical school in E-EU, especially if you want to work in the US. It's a huge pain in the butt anyway, and it would be horrible to go through all of the headaches and stress and not be able to do what you wanted to do in the first place.
    Last edited by devildoc8404; 05-19-2012 at 04:49 AM. Reason: Edit and addendum.

    "When I haven't any
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    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


  3. #3
    Wortkonig is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Wow, its worse than i thought. So you say studying at a Romanian university is a stupid idea. What about Hungary i think Hungary will be a better idea? The most shocking thing for me is what you said about EU. Cuz i know that EU countries has lots of students from middle east and middle asia even from Africa so i wasn't expecting that studying med in a EU country like Romania will be a problem for the western and scandinavian EU countries. Even when you look to UK most of the doctors or dentists are from India and Iran. And as you said no one knows what is going to happen in EU . Even EU's future is a mystery and i don't want to be stucked in Romania which doctors paid 500-800$ monthly. And do you know how the things work for dentistry? And thanks a lot for your reply devildoc.

  4. #4
    devildoc8404's Avatar
    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    Wait. Noooo, I didn't say that studying in Romania is a stupid idea OVERALL. It can be a decent and cost-effective option, but it depends -- mainly on what you want to do with your medical degree after you graduate. If you want to return to train and work in North America, and you would be starting now, then let's just say that I would advise someone I cared about to seriously re-think that position. Hungary is the same situation, actually. In fact, if you want to work in NA after about 4 years from now, there are very few great overseas options at the moment, in my opinion.

    However, if you want to work in the EU, then Romania or Hungary or Bulgaria are fine options... if you can get hired after graduation. Some countries in the EU are hiring doctors from Hungary, Romania, and Bulgaria like crazy right now, but remember that lots of those countries want to see both an EU passport and/or an EU medical degree in most cases. In England, for example, it doesn't matter whether you have an EU diploma if you are not a UK/EU/EAA citizen. You can forget about it, essentially. There are places, Germany for example, where someone who speaks the language and knows their stuff can get a job with an EU diploma despite not being an EU citizen... but that is mainly because Germany is hurting for docs right now. These countries may or may not be in the same situation in six years, and there's really no way to tell.

    I'm not sure where you got the idea that E-EU diplomas are a problem in W-EU. They are not, and I didn't say that. I said that if you want to work in a fancy university hospital, then they will be more likely to want to hire a grad from a fancy university medical school as opposed to someone from most schools in the E-EU. That makes sense, though, doesn't it? However, this does not mean that, assuming you were allowed to work in a W-EU country, that you could not find work in W-EU. Rather, you just would need to be willing to accept a residency training post at an affiliated hospital in a smaller city (IF the country allows the hiring of non-EU citizens... assuming you are not an EU citizen, you didn't say one way or the other). In fact, right now if you have completed specialization in the EU and have an EU degree, some of the Scandinavian countries will snap you up, pay you (and your family) to go through language training, and give you a job. New Zealand is actively looking for EU trained specialists, as well. But again, that is NOW... no telling how it will be in six years.

    Medical school E-EU is becoming an option to consider if you have exhausted other options, you can't afford anyplace else, and you are comfortable with the thought of working in the EU... assuming there are still countries hiring non-EU citizens when you are done. (Note: I'm not talking about working in other parts of the world besides NA and EU, because I have not personally investigated those options.)

    I have no idea about international dentistry licensing laws, except that I have some immigrant family friends whose fathers were dentists, and they both had to complete dental school all over again in the US... that was years ago, though.

    (Also, I believe that most of the Asian and Middle Eastern students in my class are not staying in the EU after they graduate. They are here to get the diploma and return home to train and work. There might be a few outliers, but in general that is the case.)
    Last edited by devildoc8404; 05-20-2012 at 06:58 AM.

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
    ."
    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


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