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  1. #1
    PercyMD is offline Junior Member
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    Last edited by PercyMD; 10-16-2013 at 08:26 AM.

  2. #2
    ClujDDS is offline Junior Member 512 points
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    The Romanian section has the toughest professors you will ever meet, tolerance level is 0 since you are competing with people from all over the country, who come from poor families and hard conditions and they'll be studying 24/7 to get the best of the best. The real question is, will you be a good doctor? Definitely yes. Since the English sections opened, they tried to modify some of the regulations to the standards of the western countries and for that reason it's not as hard as the Romanian section. Also, the Romanian section is like a military school because the discipline is top notch!

    If you haven't been in Romania for a while i suggest you come and learn the language a bit. In our section, the english one, we're obliged to write nearly 5 letters/second and about 10 pages/lecture in some courses such as anatomy...you can imagine how hard it is when you study in Romanian while you've been living outside your entire life. Don't just think that the academic level of the language is the same as the one you use during conversations. Also, no recordings are allowed and if a lecturer sees you record him/her then she'll kick you out and probably fail you.

    In some countries such as Sweden, you'd be surprised if you was in medical school...i swear it's a joke compared to our English section. In Sweden you have 1-2 and highest 3 courses/semester and you go to school only during the labs or when you choose the lectures. In Romania, you'll have 10-12 subjects/semester, starting school 8 AM to 8 PM every single day, with obligation to attend lectures and 100% attendance on labs.

    So i tell you this now, Romanian section is "navy seals" compared to our section. You will learn but let me tell you this, you'll be exhausted by the time you reach 3rd year and that's when the seriousness starts to happen after the pre-clinical states.

    My advice is this, if you want to start in Romanian then be really prepared and i advice you start now so you don't fail and lose your spot because a lot and i mean A LOT of Romanians fight for those spots because they're free. You need to show you deserve it.


    From what i've seen from my romanian friends, the tests are the same and i've translated almost all of them.

  3. #3
    PercyMD is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClujDDS View Post
    The Romanian section has the toughest professors you will ever meet, tolerance level is 0 since you are competing with people from all over the country, who come from poor families and hard conditions and they'll be studying 24/7 to get the best of the best. The real question is, will you be a good doctor? Definitely yes. Since the English sections opened, they tried to modify some of the regulations to the standards of the western countries and for that reason it's not as hard as the Romanian section. Also, the Romanian section is like a military school because the discipline is top notch!

    If you haven't been in Romania for a while i suggest you come and learn the language a bit. In our section, the english one, we're obliged to write nearly 5 letters/second and about 10 pages/lecture in some courses such as anatomy...you can imagine how hard it is when you study in Romanian while you've been living outside your entire life. Don't just think that the academic level of the language is the same as the one you use during conversations. Also, no recordings are allowed and if a lecturer sees you record him/her then she'll kick you out and probably fail you.

    In some countries such as Sweden, you'd be surprised if you was in medical school...i swear it's a joke compared to our English section. In Sweden you have 1-2 and highest 3 courses/semester and you go to school only during the labs or when you choose the lectures. In Romania, you'll have 10-12 subjects/semester, starting school 8 AM to 8 PM every single day, with obligation to attend lectures and 100% attendance on labs.

    So i tell you this now, Romanian section is "navy seals" compared to our section. You will learn but let me tell you this, you'll be exhausted by the time you reach 3rd year and that's when the seriousness starts to happen after the pre-clinical states.

    My advice is this, if you want to start in Romanian then be really prepared and i advice you start now so you don't fail and lose your spot because a lot and i mean A LOT of Romanians fight for those spots because they're free. You need to show you deserve it.


    From what i've seen from my romanian friends, the tests are the same and i've translated almost all of them.
    I hold a BSci in molecular biology from the States. How much more can Romanian high school students be prepared than me?

  4. #4
    PercyMD is offline Junior Member
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    Last edited by PercyMD; 10-16-2013 at 08:26 AM.

  5. #5
    Catarro is offline Member 514 points
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    I am a Pharmacy graduate and believe me when I say their level and entrance exams are hard. I took the biology exam and by the time I finished studying for it I realized that most of that stuff is only though in med school in most western countries. I mean, did you study human biology (anatomy, physiology, some biochem) or organic chemistry (real stuff like basic nucleophilic and electrophilic mechanisms, synthesis, friedel-crafts reaction etc.) in high-school? I certainly did not. I had 87% on the exam, and the last guy to get a seat on the Romanian section had 90%. So me, a western pharmacy graduate, would not be admitted to the Romanian program (though I should have studied more, and I was working at the time). The material they study in high-school is tough, and so are the entrance exams. The competition is very high, especially because most of the seats are free.

    In general all English programs in E-EU are not as hard as the local language one's. How can they be? Most students that are admitted suck so bad that they wouldn't even be considered for the contest to apply to medicine in their home country.

    Some professors teach in both sections, some do not. But put yourself in their shoes: would you bother yourself for some low wage with making life miserable for students that will not stay and practice in your own country? Or will you make it hard to raise the faculty reputation and to prepare good doctors regardless of where they may practice afterwards? I think it comes down to the teacher, but you will probably find both kind. And this applies to all foreign sections in E-EU. If you are an European, just talk to Erasmus students that come from chezc, hungarian or romanian programs and are doing a year in your country. They will generally say that the english section in their home country have it easier.

    Just study hard regardless of what the exams look like.
    Last edited by Catarro; 09-14-2011 at 12:29 PM.

  6. #6
    Catarro is offline Member 514 points
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    Btw if you want to study in the Romanian section, then contact waltf on VMD. He just did his first year in English at Oradea, learned the language, and transferred to the Romanian section. This way you will have no problem with the CA approved list.

  7. #7
    PercyMD is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catarro View Post
    I am a Pharmacy graduate and believe me when I say their level and entrance exams are hard. I took the biology exam and by the time I finished studying for it I realized that most of that stuff is only though in med school in most western countries. I mean, did you study human biology (anatomy, physiology, some biochem) or organic chemistry (real stuff like basic nucleophilic and electrophilic mechanisms, synthesis, friedel-crafts reaction etc.) in high-school? I certainly did not. I had 87% on the exam, and the last guy to get a seat on the Romanian section had 90%. So me, a western pharmacy graduate, would not be admitted to the Romanian program (though I should have studied more, and I was working at the time). The material they study in high-school is tough, and so are the entrance exams. The competition is very high, especially because most of the seats are free.

    In general all English programs in E-EU are not as hard as the local language one's. How can they be? Most students that are admitted suck so bad that they wouldn't even be considered for the contest to apply to medicine in their home country.

    Some professors teach in both sections, some do not. But put yourself in their shoes: would you bother yourself for some low wage with making life miserable for students that will not stay and practice in your own country? Or will you make it hard to raise the faculty reputation and to prepare good doctors regardless of where they may practice afterwards? I think it comes down to the teacher, but you will probably find both kind. And this applies to all foreign sections in E-EU. If you are an European, just talk to Erasmus students that come from chezc, hungarian or romanian programs and are doing a year in your country. They will generally say that the english section in their home country have it easier.

    Just study hard regardless of what the exams look like.
    Are you trying to say US students are as prepared as Romanian ones? When the US is spewing out excellent doctors? And that there are a number of Romanians who are having difficulty passing the USMLEs? Just sayin'.

  8. #8
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    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    Hold up, it's time to take a reality check, here.

    In almost every instance, the US students who wind up studying medicine in the E-EU are not the same quality as students who are able to remain home and gain admission at a US medical school. Yes, the US turns out very good physicians, but they are also selecting from the best of the university graduates. If you're looking at an E-EU school and you're American, then the simple fact is (usually) that you weren't up to snuff for a US medical school. Not always, but almost all of the time. This is not to say that a US student studying in the E-EU can't become a great doc, but the general quality across the board is lower.

    The E-EU native language programs are more competitive because they only accept the best students in the country. The English language students are admitted, in general, in spite of significantly lesser academic achievement mainly because they are money-makers for the school. Yes, again, there are outliers... but it is a fairly safe assumption.

    Furthermore, USMLE pass rates are a ridiculous thing to try to use as a determinant of physician quality in the E-EU. Romanian (and Bulgarian, and Czech, and Finnish, and Costa Rican, and Russian, and and and and...) students will usually have trouble with the USMLE, no matter how smart they are, because it is a challenging English language examination. How well do you think you would do on a Romanian (Bulgarian, Czech, Finnish, Spanish, Russian) qualification examination? One of the most brilliant docs I have met here in Bulgaria speaks fluent Bulgarian, Russian, French, and German, but his English is a little rough. He would get his butt handed to him on the USMLE, but does that somehow make him a lesser physician?

    Here in Sofia, we have some Bulgarians each year who score very well on the USMLE, but in general that is because of a combination of excellent English language skills (often due to extended living periods in the UK or USA), outstanding medical school achievement, and somebody busting their tails really-really hard. Not everyone's English is good enough to score a passing USMLE.

    (And just on the of chance that this thread is trying to head down the "well then, which medical school format puts out better doctors" path, let's head that off at the pass right now. That bit has already been beaten to death in the VMD forum, and it's a fool's argument, either way. They both do the job, end of story.)

    Quote Originally Posted by prepb4 View Post
    Are you trying to say US students are as prepared as Romanian ones? When the US is spewing out excellent doctors? And that there are a number of Romanians who are having difficulty passing the USMLEs? Just sayin'.

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  9. #9
    Catarro is offline Member 514 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by prepb4 View Post
    Are you trying to say US students are as prepared as Romanian ones? When the US is spewing out excellent doctors? And that there are a number of Romanians who are having difficulty passing the USMLEs? Just sayin'.
    O_o What? Where did you get that? I said no such thing. I was talking about admission exams to the native (romanian) program, not about quality of doctors or whatever...

    I subscribe to what devildoc said about the USMLE. Come to Portugal and take the 2 licensing exams and the chances are you will fail. Not because you are a bad doctor but because you weren't bred academically for the system. The same happens to foreign graduates taking the USMLE.
    Last edited by Catarro; 09-14-2011 at 02:54 PM.

  10. #10
    PercyMD is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by devildoc8404 View Post
    Hold up, it's time to take a reality check, here.

    In almost every instance, the US students who wind up studying medicine in the E-EU are not the same quality as students who are able to remain home and gain admission at a US medical school. Yes, the US turns out very good physicians, but they are also selecting from the best of the university graduates. If you're looking at an E-EU school and you're American, then the simple fact is (usually) that you weren't up to snuff for a US medical school. Not always, but almost all of the time. This is not to say that a US student studying in the E-EU can't become a great doc, but the general quality across the board is lower.

    The E-EU native language programs are more competitive because they only accept the best students in the country. The English language students are admitted, in general, in spite of significantly lesser academic achievement mainly because they are money-makers for the school. Yes, again, there are outliers... but it is a fairly safe assumption.

    Furthermore, USMLE pass rates are a ridiculous thing to try to use as a determinant of physician quality in the E-EU. Romanian (and Bulgarian, and Czech, and Finnish, and Costa Rican, and Russian, and and and and...) students will usually have trouble with the USMLE, no matter how smart they are, because it is a challenging English language examination. How well do you think you would do on a Romanian (Bulgarian, Czech, Finnish, Spanish, Russian) qualification examination? One of the most brilliant docs I have met here in Bulgaria speaks fluent Bulgarian, Russian, French, and German, but his English is a little rough. He would get his butt handed to him on the USMLE, but does that somehow make him a lesser physician?

    Here in Sofia, we have some Bulgarians each year who score very well on the USMLE, but in general that is because of a combination of excellent English language skills (often due to extended living periods in the UK or USA), outstanding medical school achievement, and somebody busting their tails really-really hard. Not everyone's English is good enough to score a passing USMLE.

    (And just on the of chance that this thread is trying to head down the "well then, which medical school format puts out better doctors" path, let's head that off at the pass right now. That bit has already been beaten to death in the VMD forum, and it's a fool's argument, either way. They both do the job, end of story.)
    I agree about the English part, but from what I've heard, the English part isn't all that to blame. And I mainly say this because I've had first-hand contact with a E-EU graduate who passed the USMLEs on the 3rd time around. His main areas were English but significantly more than that was the material, in the regard that he was not as prepared knowledge wise given the medical school he attended. And, upon entering a residency, American grads were more prepared than he was. So, even though for the most part, E-EU med schools aim towards selecting the best students, those best students aren't necessarily that prepared as you two make it out to be.
    And yes, a student attending a E-EU more than likely was not up to par to US med school standards. I have several friends who are now on their 3rd year after college trying to gain admissions to a US school. But then there are those...Actually, a recent example which baffled me. He had failed 5 undergrad courses, did not even have a science major, just a B.A., went to the Carib to do his premed requisites, then entered the med school...Long story short, passed his Step 1 and 2 on the first try (that was unexpectant) and is now a working resident, matched with no issues. That just blew me away.

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