Sponsored Links
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 33
Like Tree2Likes

Thread: TIPS for a GREAT Personal Statement

  1. #1
    IMG SURVIVOR's Avatar
    IMG SURVIVOR is offline Moderator 536 points
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    5,842
    Downloads
    43
    Uploads
    0
    Blog Entries
    29
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    TIPS for a GREAT Personal Statement

    OK post your tips or suggestions of what NOT to do and what TO DO in a personal statement.

    I will make this a Sticky.
    To help generations to come about this problem.

    GOD Bless and Thank you for sharing
    IMG SURVIVOR
    Moderator: USMLE AND Residency Forums.

    Hidden Content
    why even bother with the obvious. Just know where you are need it and where you can help the most.

  2. #21
    m96
    m96 is offline Newbie 512 points
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    19
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Advertisements



    I sincerely hope IMG's will soon start writing their own PS rather than PAY a website to write about them

    What i have searched. the font is : courier new
    size : 10-11

    And yes, dont start with an interesting case history.

  3. #22
    Axedall is offline Newbie 510 points
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by t3tsu0 View Post
    Can anyone recommend a good writing service for the personal statement. I'm a horrible writer. No two ways about. I don't want to waste my time or my chances considering my ability.

    Thanks!
    Holy crap man! What program directors are looking for is exactly the opposite of you. Save your time and don't bother applying if you are going to cheat just because you are too lazy to put real effort into it. Or better yet, you could actually structure your letter around how you pay others to perform for you instead of doing it yourself. At least your letter will be original and likely highly memorable that way.

  4. #23
    jumar1281 is offline Junior Member 517 points
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    52
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    a program director once told me he wants honesty. he was personally turned off by heart wrenching inspirational stories. talk about yourself, your positives, if you have any negatives and what you have done to improve yourself.

  5. #24
    DrDVS is offline Junior Member 510 points
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    25
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Great Post - Thanks.

  6. #25
    pciforacs is offline Junior Member 513 points
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    21
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    personal statment advice, part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Axedall View Post
    Holy crap man! What program directors are looking for is exactly the opposite of you. Save your time and don't bother applying if you are going to cheat just because you are too lazy to put real effort into it. Or better yet, you could actually structure your letter around how you pay others to perform for you instead of doing it yourself. At least your letter will be original and likely highly memorable that way.



    While I agree with your premise that having someone else write your personal statement is not the best approach, I think your advice could be misinterpreted. Paying to have someone write your personal statement for you is dangerously close to plagairism; paying to have your statement edited is not. As a side note, the vitriol in posts like yours never ceases to amaze me. Considering that the majority of people on these forums are in medicine, either as IMGs or American doctors in training, I would think that we could demonstrate a little more civility, but maybe I expect too much from future colleagues.

    If you read the websites for application editing services, most of them imply that great personal statements are used to choose applicants to interview. Occasionally that is true, but in the large majority of cases personal statements are used to weed out applicants. Lets pretend for a moment that I am the program director of ENT at Mass Gen. I have 450 applicants and 30 interview spots. Of those 450 applicants, 50 are IMGs. For the sake of our argument, lets assume that all 50 IMGs have USMLE scores in the 250+ range, suggesting that they will do quite well on their board examinations. However, when I look at their applications, I want to know more than who will help maintain my programs excellent board pass rate, I want to know which of these applicants will represent my program well to the patients and staff they will interact with every day as residents at my program. Submitting a personal statement/application with poor English suggests that I will be reading poorly written admission H & Ps and progress notes for the next few years, and also suggests that you may struggle communicating with patients. It also tells me that you may be smart, but you aren’t committed enough to make sure that your application is as good as it can be before applying. More than likely, I wont take the time to interview you. So, in a roundabout way, personal statements are used to select applicants to interview (see the 2012 NRMP survey, which lists personal statements as the 3rd most important factor in selecting applicants for interviews); however, in reality, they are often used as a negative tool to weed out poor applicants.

    As IMGs, you already know that there are dozens of people out there looking to make money off your dream to train in American residencies and fellowships. Many of these services are actually valuable and are worth the financial investment, but quite a few are not. It makes me frustrated when I edit a document that a client has already spent hundreds of dollars on, and find it to be deplorable, albeit with correct grammar. Ideally, you should not need to pay to have your application documents edited. Asking a native English-speaking friend or two to edit your document(s) is preferred, especially if they are in medicine. If you need additional help, spending a few extra dollars for a professional service may be worth it, just take these places with a grain of salt. Just because most of them say “We will help you match” does not mean that they will improve your personal statement, much less help you achieve your dream match.

    Ill try to post a few personal statement tips in the coming weeks, especially since there are quite a few misleading statements on this thread. I will end with two recommendations. First, start working on your personal statement early. The more times you can review it, the better. Second, blanket statements, like “never discuss a heart wrenching story” are worthless. A program director at one of the extremely competitive residencies at Mayo Clinic once told me about the opening lines in a personal statement he had received. It went something like this. “The first bomb killed my mother. The second killed my father.” I still remember those sentences years after I heard them. Based
    on advice in this thread, that’s a poor opening sentence.
    Naijaman24 likes this.

  7. #26
    pciforacs is offline Junior Member 513 points
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    21
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Personal Statement Pointers


    Personal Statement Pointers from the application editing team at editingMD.com (Personal Statements | EditingMD)

    Do:

    • Create the image you want to present to the residency/fellowship committee and lay out a consistent story to that end. For example, if you want to do basic science research, and have already worked on basic science projects, weave that into your story. If you love rural medicine and have training in rural medicine (or grew up in a rural area), make sure that comes across clearly. Back up your unique image with evidence from your life. You will further develop these themes during your interview. Do NOT imply that you want to be a world famous basic science researcher if you have never taken part in basic science research. Lying or exaggerating your goals is easily identified by committees and often results in rejection before the interview stage.
    • Personal experiences can be used effectively to create the unique image you will present to residency/fellowship committees. However, you MUST resist the temptation to say that your main reason for going into internal medicine/general surgery/retina/plastic surgery is your uncle’s experience with CHF/diverticulitis/macular degeneration/skin grafting etc 25 years ago.
    • Make a point to describe why you are applying for specialty X. Generic statements, like “I knew that I wanted to go into general surgery after seeing a child recover following surgical management of appendicitis” tells me that you like it when patients get better following treatment. It does not convince me that YOU know that general surgery is right for you, much less make ME comfortable considering you further for my residency program. Give specific details as to why you are choosing your specialty (or sub-specialty for fellowship applicants), thereby showing the program director and committee members that you are making an educated decision, not a decision that might be changed shortly after starting residency or fellowship.
    • Discuss future goals, and tie them back to the experiences in life that helped make you who you are. Past success is the best predictor of future success. For example, talking about your interest in public health advocacy has added weight if you have worked in that domain in the years before your application.


    Our professional application editing team has developed a 4-page pdf with advice on what you should, and should NOT write in your personal statement. That document also includes specific guidelines for fellowship applicants. If you send us an email requesting these guidelines (Contact | EditingMD), we will be happy to send them your way free of charge.


    I have one last thought to leave you with. As I alluded to in my last post, it is disappointing to see members post disparaging remarks about each other on threads like this. As a practicing physician I have interacted with a number of colleagues who think they are a cut above and treat others, including physicians, nurses, and ancillary staff, with contempt. As the next generation of physicians I encourage you to strive to rise above this mindset and choose to treat others with respect, even on anonymous forums. As physicians we have a responsibility to act in a way that reflects well on our profession, and kindness and humility are always in season.


    All the best,

    EditingMD Team
    Last edited by pciforacs; 06-26-2013 at 11:31 PM.
    devildoc8404 likes this.

  8. #27
    Sawank is offline Junior Member 511 points
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    48
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hello.

    In my normal life I face good or bad situations.
    For good situations there is nothing to do.
    For bad situations I follow these steps.
    1) What I did wrong in past that's why I am facing this issue.
    2) How to over come from this.
    3) Atleast find 3 ways to solve this.
    4) Consider advices from your elders.
    5) start with appropriet one the best suit to you no matter how much time it will take.

    Hope this help.
    Thank you.

  9. #28
    Sawank is offline Junior Member 511 points
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    48
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    If you are struggling with the residency personal statement and want to overcome this problem i think you need to join good personal statement programs. In my suggestion Residency Personal Statement is best for all student because they are specialize in these personal statements and in making sure they are always created to fit your needs.

  10. #29
    Sawank is offline Junior Member 511 points
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    48
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    To get selected for residency program you need to make sure that you have an outstanding personal statement that will separate you from the pack and help you stand out from all other applicants. Personal statements are designed with the purpose of helping residency admissions boards decide whether you are a perfect match for the program. You have to describe your strengths and weaknesses so that they turn to your advantage and allow you to succeed.

  11. #30
    Locutusofborg's Avatar
    Locutusofborg is offline Member 535 points
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    369
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I disagree completely about not making a PS interesting. How many "hello, Im Dr. Stet Sanitizer, and I am keenly interested in your position. I am a team player and I love my patients so so much" can they read in a day?? It's better to SHOW who you are instead of SAYING who you are. Let your personality come out. If you are funny, BE funny. If you care about patients, talk about the ISSUES that affect patients, not how you care about them.

    Think of the match as dating. Being a generic good guy might get you a date, but it won't "seal the deal" with the date (I will allow each of you to interpret that depending upon your cultural and personal expectations of what "sealing the deal" might mean). Being genuine, being a bad boy (or girl), being outspoken will either get you LOVED or HATED. And trust me, there is no difference between being unimpressive, and being hated. Either way, you don't rank. So increasing your chances of being LOVED means being DIFFERENT. And you cannot be different without being interesting and unexpected.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Tips For Writing An Exceptional Personal Statement For Saba?
    By Confused 20 in forum Saba University School of Medicine
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-19-2013, 05:45 AM
  2. Tips on writing strong Personal statement
    By medhelp in forum Residency Match Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-07-2011, 12:13 PM
  3. Personal Statement Tips for Residency Applications
    By Anonymous in forum Residency Match Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-21-2003, 09:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •