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  1. #1
    aucguy is offline Junior Member
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    Family Medicine: Unopposed vs. Opposed Programs

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    Quick question to "those that might know"...

    I've heard that "unopposed" programs (those without other residency programs) are better in that there is no fighting for patients with other specialties, etc - therefore the training is better....

    However...

    I've also heard that "opposed" programs are better because one gets better all-around training and works with other residents.

    So, to the people who might know, which is better and why?

    Any advice/help you can provide is appreciated, thanks.

  2. #2
    Anonymous is offline Unregistered Guest
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    opposed vs unopposed

    I've talked to FP residents who did med school clinicals at an opposed institution and they told me that the FP residents didnt get as much attention as at an unopposed place. At the unopposed place, attendings allow you to do anything. Supposedly at opposed places, the internal med /surgery/ etc. residents take the cake and the FP residents many times get left out, because of pre-conceived notions that they dont really need to learn.

    I guess either way is fine, but at opposed you would have to struggle more and act more interested in order to get noticed.
    To me, I'd just take what I can get into rather than worry what kind it is, but if you actually do have a choice, weigh your options and talk to residents at opposed vs. unopposed and get a general consensus. I've only heard this from residents at an unopposed institution so it might be biased. However, these particular residents felt like they were in heaven with all the personalize attention they were getting, compared to what they have witnessed in opposed programs.

  3. #3
    MDJack is offline Junior Member
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    Re:

    As an FP, you are treated first class in unopposed programs. Why? Simply because there is no one else around. Depending on opposed programs, you may be treated as second class to no class. The few unopposed programs I know treat FP residents with utmost respect. These residents receive a very well rounded training because all cases in all fields go to them. Some programs with IM will give two patients for admit to IM floor per patient admit to FP floor. Programs with OB/GYN will allow FP residents do deliveries only, no C-section. And even with just deliveries, FP only do 1/2 compared to OB/GYN. This goes for all the other specialties as well. If given the choice, one should choose unopposed. Good luck and enjoy the FP field - "the jack of all trade and master of none"! Just my cup of tea.

  4. #4
    Anonymous is offline Unregistered Guest
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    FP

    I interviewed at 12 FP programs, both unopposed and oppossed (to a certain extent). However, there are advantages and disadvantages.

    In an unopposed program, FP residents get to do everything. So if you don't like some rotations, then you're screwed.

    I personally like to work with residents of other specialty b/c I'm a social person and I like to be in a crowd. I don't like OB that much and I hate surgery. So if I can get by (with the help of the residents in those specialty), that would just be great....

    For inpatients, you will get to follow your own pt (continuity) if they get admitted. IM gets people w/o their own doctors in most cases.

    And it's just so nice to be able to do some rotations in a big county hospital (>1000 beds) with other residents and then go back to your own "home" FP center to do outpts.

    Besides, most unopposed program are in the rural areas which isn't for me.

    I've found a program like this already and I hope they rank me high

  5. #5
    Divorcea is offline Newbie 510 points
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    If you are a medical student who has decided on a career in family medicine, you will need to weigh your residency program options carefully — the right choice may not be the obvious one. Program location, ranking, educational rigor, opportunities to specialize, and other factors will affect your future, so you must consider all facets thoughtfully. We’ll discuss several important components of choosing a family medicine residency program in this post, but first, here are several useful resources from the AAFP to get you started:

    Download — and read cover to cover — the free comprehensive guide by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), Strolling Through the Match.
    Register with the American Medical Association’s FREIDA OnlineŽ database service, which enables you to search and access information on some 9800 ACGME-accredited graduate medical education programs and more than 100 combined specialty programs. FREIDA OnlineŽ enables clear comparisons of multiple programs and, for AMA members, a dashboard feature empowers residency candidates to rate, track, and manage programs to which they are interested in applying.
    Plan to attend the AAFP’s National Conference, which is held each summer in Kansas City and provides a cost- and time-effective opportunity to touch base with hundreds of family medicine residency programs all in one place.

    There are an abundance of helpful online resources to assist imminent med-school graduates in navigating the complex — and rather grueling — Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) and National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) processes. Here are some of the bigger, more nuanced aspects of evaluating family medicine residency programs.
    Likelihood of Being Matched to a Family Medicine Residency Program

    According to statistics published by the NRMP and reported by the AAFP, some 3060 graduating medical students chose careers in family medicine in 2015, representing a sixth consecutive year of growth for the field. At the same time, some 3216 family medicine residency positions were offered, meaning 95.1% of available positions were filled. While the fill rate in 2015 was down slightly from 2014, there was an absolute increase of 84 positions, with some 60 additional medical graduates accepting positions in family medicine residency in 2015 compared with last year.

    In July 2014, the AAFP reported that 477 accredited family medicine residency programs hosted a grand total of 10,662 first through third-year residents.yup, i agree with the previous posts. the only reason that an fp should want to train in a major university setting is if you are going into academics or want to do some type of research (often epidemiological/MPH type stuff with FP). Otherwise, stick with the known, reputable community programs that give you a good amount of autonomy with few specialist stealing your patients and procedures. I know that at my med school (where we have both IM and FP in patient services), the emergency room will only admit a patient to the FP service if they are 1. already an FP clinic patient or 2. a fairly simple/straight forward case (I think that they get a lot of cellulits, 1 day IV abx cases). I can't imagine that it's good for their training if they miss the complicated cases that we see in IM sometimes. You should want to see the most complicated, sick patients who have multiple comorbid conditions as a resident, and you can look for the simple admit cases as an attending.

  6. #6
    gqprince is offline Newbie 510 points
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    It's better to go into an unopposed program because you get the training from all specialities.

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