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  1. #1
    whimsica is offline Newbie 510 points
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    How does acidosis and alkalosis affect whole body potassium loss?

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    Which condition (acidosis, alkalosis) would lead to more whole body potassium loss?

    In acidosis hydrogen would exchange for intracellular potassium leading to hyperkalemia. Would the excess potassium in the blood eventually be excreted by raising aldosterone leading to whole body potassium loss or would the acidosis prevent the excretion and somehow maintain the hyperkalemia? How does this affect whole body potassium?

    In alkalosis potassium and hydrogen would exchange to raise intracellular potassium and cause hypokalemia, but would that also lead to more potassium excretion?

    Which condition would lead to more whole body potassium loss?
    Is there a difference if the acidosis or alkalosis is acute or chronic?

    Thanks,

    Dan

  2. #2
    carlosc717 is offline Newbie 510 points
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    According to what i've read, as you said, acidosis creates a shift between H+/K+ from the inside to the outside of the cell, leading to hyperkalemia. But also, as the kidney tries to get rid off H+, the intratubular concentration of hidrogenions increase, and this deacreases the filtration of K+, especially in the distal tubule. The increased + charge in the intratubular space decreases the passage of potassium from the lining cell.

    That's another reason.

    But i'll try to check out the book again to better understand the condition.

  3. #3
    whimsica is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlosc717 View Post
    According to what i've read, as you said, acidosis creates a shift between H+/K+ from the inside to the outside of the cell, leading to hyperkalemia. But also, as the kidney tries to get rid off H+, the intratubular concentration of hidrogenions increase, and this deacreases the filtration of K+, especially in the distal tubule. The increased + charge in the intratubular space decreases the passage of potassium from the lining cell.

    That's another reason.

    But i'll try to check out the book again to better understand the condition.
    Thanks for checking. Which book are you looking in?
    I've looked around and can't figure it out. I would imagine that hyperkalemia is temporary and eventually depletes the body of potassium because it's exchanging out of the cells. The blood could remain high but the whole body potassium may eventually get depleted. Maybe that's hard to measure. I think it's measured by some radioactive isotope found naturally in potassium?

  4. #4
    mtreece is offline Newbie 510 points
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    There is a really good video on this subject at YouTube. This site will not allow me to post the link. So, go to YouTube and search for Normal Acid-Base Regulation by Eric Strong, MD It is part of the Stanford School of Medicine series of videos. It is 22.02 minutes and the best explanation I have found.

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