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Thread: hormones

  1. #1
    IMG SURVIVOR's Avatar
    IMG SURVIVOR is offline Moderator 536 points
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    hormones

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    You have a 24 year old male patient that comes to the ER with pain in the lef flank, hematuria and disuria, you start the IV and start treating the patient, the lab comes back confirming that he has kidney stone from calcium.

    What is the primary hormone in regulating calcium in your body?
    Where is created?
    I know very easy
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    why even bother with the obvious. Just know where you are need it and where you can help the most.

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    drdeb is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    vit D

    The PTH hormone activates vitamin D in the kidneys.
    the activated vitamin D inturn enhances calcium absorption.

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    IMG SURVIVOR's Avatar
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    Very good, also remember that PTH is created in the Parathyroid gland.

    PTH also reabsorbs calcium, and excrete Phosphate.

    Followup question

    How the PTH helps in the excretion of phosphate?
    what cell of the Parathyroid gland creates PTH?

    ALL this is basic stuff THAT THEY ASK, and you will say during the test OMG I dont remember, but now you will have it clear in your head.
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    why even bother with the obvious. Just know where you are need it and where you can help the most.

  4. #4
    drdeb is offline Junior Member 510 points
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    chief cells

    Yes….increased levels of PTH concentration causes increase in calcium reabsorption thus decreasing excretion and vice versa.

    Increase in PTH concentration increases in phosphate excretion (i.e. just opposite to what it does to calcium)

    PTH is formed in the chief cells of parathyroid glands.

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