Sponsored Links
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    azskeptic's Avatar
    azskeptic is offline Moderator 666 points
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    6,728
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Nursing dreams that don't live up to reality

    Advertisements



    http://www.moneycontrol.com/backends...?autono=173461

    Nursing dreams that don't live up to reality


    Fake nursing institutes are luring gullible girls with promises of good jobs abroad and a great salary package. In the process, patients may actually leave hospitals in worse conditions than when they entered it.



    Every year, lakhs of young Indian women join the long list of those wanting to take care of sick people, aspiring to don the white dress that inspires trust when you visit a hospital. Today, nurses from India are sought after across the globe and feeding on this huge demand are unscrupulous people, running illegal training and certification institutes.

    Uncovered went undercover and sought admission to some of these illegal institutes and unearthed a racket that has been flourishing right under the nose of the authorities.

    An Uncovered reporter walked into one such institute among 110 that was blacklisted. This institute is in a one-storeyed ramshackle building in Chembur - a crowded suburb of Mumbai. A board outside says that it is a health clinic. After being made to wait for a while, the reporter is finally ushered up a steep flight of stairs. The rooms are small but the promises that are made here within the four walls, are really big.

    A woman tells the reporter, "There are a lot of vacancies in the Gulf and Dubai. I can easily get you a nursing job there, even if you've just done a year-long course. We will do all the documentation, you don't worry about it."

    A person aspiring to become a nurse has to undergo a minimum training of three and a half years, from an institute certified by the Maharashtra Nursing Council. The lady offers the Uncovered reporter a choice of three courses of a duration of 6, 12 and 36 months respectively. The lady describes the course and says, "The year-long course will be divided into three months of theory and nine months of practicals at a nursing home. We will make sure you get a job in the end."

    What she does not reveal is that this institute has been banned. The Maharashtra Nursing Council notice is as strong as it can be. If an institute doesn’t stop its operations, legal action will be taken against them. This institute has violated norms and did not have the necessary approvals and neither has it applied for them.

    The first notice was served on August 24, 2004. The Council members say this institute has not even replied to the notice. When Uncovered contacted the institute, it said that it had indeed received the notice last year and had now replied on July 12, 2005. It claims that it runs medical educational programmes that include several alternative medical science courses like natural traditional medicines, yoga, herbal hospital, etc. It says that it does not run any nursing course, which is contrary to what was caught on camera!

    If only this institute was an exception which it isn't. The Maharashtra Nursing Council has identified more than 100 such institutes who are offering courses without a license. Most of these institutes claim to be certified by the central government or the university. They offer short courses that will get you a job as a nurse, whether you have passed Std 10 or not. But the Maharashtra Nursing Council says that none of these are certified.

    Chairman of the Vigilance Board, Maharashtra Nursing Council, Ramling Mali told CNBC-TV18, "These illegal institutes give ads like HSC or SSC pass or fail. Course duration ranges from three months to one year and they are taking advantage, especially of females."

    Since 2003, the Council has identified 110 institutes in Maharashtra. The Council claims that the numbers could be far more staggering as these are just those institutes from where girls have passed out and approached them or whose ads they’ve seen.

    Some illegal institutes that were sent notices from the Maharashtra Nursing Council have gone to the extent of returning them. An Uncovered reporter went to one such institute where a notice was sent exactly a year ago, on July 1, 2004.

    This little education centre is situated an hour's drive away from South Mumbai, in New Mumbai and knows that its course is not recognised. That’s why any new nursing aspirant is welcomed with open arms. When the Uncovered reporter walked in, the girls fluttered around her and quickly called up their boss, who told her that their year-long nursing course would cost a mere Rs 4,800.

    What thousands of young unsuspecting girls who walk into such institutes don't know is the fact that everything the woman said is illegal. The law makes it clear that there can only be three different certified courses in India. The general nursing and midwifery course is for Std 12 pass students and is of a duration of three and a half years. The auxiliary nursing and midwifery course is of a duration of 18 months and the minimum qualification is Std 10 pass. The BSC course is of the longest duration, a period of four years, here again you need to be Std 12 pass to apply.

    Course Duration Qualification
    General nursing 3 and a half years Std 12
    Auxiliary nursing 18 months Std 10
    BSC 4 years Std 12









    Mali said, "The main reason behind the mushrooming of illegal institutes I find is that the number of legal institutes in the state of Maharashtra is very less and admissions are also very low. There is a difference in supply and demand - the number of legal institutes are less and the illegal institutes are more."

    These institutes offer cheap courses with fees ranging from Rs 4,500 for three months to Rs 50,000 for one year. But in this case, cheap fees also means cheap labour. The Council members allege that nurses from such institutes are being exploited by smaller private nursing homes for very low salaries.

    Mali explained, "Small nursing hospitals are appointing them because they cannot afford to pay qualified nurses. That’s why they are paying untrained nurses less salary - about Rs 1,000-Rs 1,500 - and they are exploiting them. The musters maintained by these hospitals will not show them as a nurse, the rolls will maintain them as ayah (maid) or supervisor but they’ll be actually working as nursing personnel."

    The crackdown has primarily meant notices from the Council. They say that it has only been partially effective with some stopping these nursing courses. Others have now cleverly started calling their courses as training to become an 'hospital assistant', which roughly translates to ‘nurse’ while others, have not even bothered to reply!

    Mali elaborated, "The nursing profession is going to be ruined. Any person wearing the uniform of a nurse and she is not qualified and she does anything wrong, the public will have a image that a nurse is doing it, this is bad for the nursing profession."

    The law makes it very clear. Every training institute is required to get the approval and recognition of the Council and should make an application for the same but the institutes were breaking those very rules.

    A hostel, classrooms, well-qualified teaching staff, laboratories and clinical facilities are just a few of the requirements an institute needs, to be recognised. They are then approved by the State Nursing Council and the Indian Nursing Council, followed by which they need to get an essentiality certificate from the state government, which states that it is needed in the area.

    They cannot hold any exam with the intention of issuing a certificate that will show that the person holding the certificate is qualified to practice as a nurse, midwife, health visitor, as the case may be, unless such an institution is approved and recognised by the Council for that purpose.

    The problem of illegal nursing institutes is not limited to Maharashtra alone. The Delhi Nursing Council has blacklisted five institutes in the capital that were running such courses. They claim that repeated notices to such institutes have however fallen on deaf ears.

    South Delhi’s Jeevan Nursing Home has been blacklisted by the Delhi Nursing Council. But that has not deterred them from still running their nursing courses. Uncovered spoke to a girl who came all the way from Kolkata with dreams of becoming a nurse. She paid Rs 15,000 for the course, only to realise later that the course is not recognised nor are the facilities adequate. She said, "This course is useless. They are just using us, as we are free labour. The facilities are also very bad."

    The nursing home in turn, denies offering any such course but Uncovered discovered that there are 40 young girls, who are training to become nurses at this institute. The in-charge of Jeevan Nursing Home, Sudarshan Sabharwal said, "We do not conduct any nursing course. Only girls who come for training are trained here."

    The nursing home doubles up as an institute, with the result that they make money on the course and have unqualified nurses whom they don’t need to pay a penny. Tthat in turn translates to big profits. The Delhi Nursing Council says that they’ve already sent three notices to the nursing home but it was all in vain.

    In charge at the Delhi Nursing Council, Vimala Kapur, said, "I request such institutes to conduct only certified courses. They should not say they are conducting a house assistant course and then actually conduct a nursing course. it's very bad for the profession."

    Leading private hospitals claim that they are aware of the problem and do not recruit girls who have passed out from illegal institutes. Vice President of Lilawati Hospital, Dr Narendra Trivedi explaimed, "We at Lilavati are aware of all these institutes, where sisters are trained just for three to four months and then they are promised jobs in big hospitals. But we have realized that and they do not get jobs in institutes like ours. When we ask for applications from nurses, we screen their applications and their biodatas"

    "We see that those who’ve done their 12th standard and a nursing course of three and a half years from a recognized institute which are recognized by the Bombay Nursing Council and the All India Nursing Council, we only then call them for interviews and we also call BSC nurses who have passed out of SNDT for interviews."

    The woefully short number of nurses in Maharashtra is just making matters worse. It's something these fake institutes are taking advantage of. In Maharashtra, there should be one general nurse for every 750 people but the number stands at one nurse for 1,227 people - the deficit being 51,838 nurses!

    In the case of auxiliary or backup nurses, the number should be one nurse for 1,500 people. Here too, the number stands at one for 2,412 people - a deficit of 16,388 nurses!

    However, Indian nurses are immensely sought after abroad. In the US alone, at present the US Department of Health and Human Services says, there is a demand for 1,20,000 nurses. With promises of better paypackets, where the minimum salary is $3,200 a month, along with health benefits, a lot of qualified young Indian nurses are heading for foreign shores to secure a better future for themselves.

    This is obviously leading to a crunch in India. The demand for nurses abroad is perhaps what prompts many dubious institutes to offer quick courses to cash in on this need. It's important for such fake institutes to be shut down because the girls are literally dealing with matters of life and death in this profession and their ignorance and lack of proper training could prove to be genuinely fatal.


    Natasha ****** & Manali Rohinesh
    Moderator - State Licensing Forum

    Still skeptical after all these years.
    This is it. There are no hidden meanings.WYSIWYG

    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

  2. #2
    teratos's Avatar
    teratos is offline Jedi Moderator 658 points
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Bridge of the Executor
    Posts
    11,317
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    jeez

    Next thing you know there will be diploma mills giving out MD's
    AUC Class of '99
    Bored certified
    I may be a jerk, but I'm a Jedi jerk like my father.

    Some say I look like Buzz Lightyear....
    (They're right)

    DISCLAIMER: I have no financial stake in ValueMD, or any medical school.

  3. #3
    azskeptic's Avatar
    azskeptic is offline Moderator 666 points
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    6,728
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    cackling allowed

    Quote Originally Posted by teratos
    Next thing you know there will be diploma mills giving out MD's
    That makes me laugh....ha ha
    Moderator - State Licensing Forum

    Still skeptical after all these years.
    This is it. There are no hidden meanings.WYSIWYG

    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

Similar Threads

  1. dreams look shattered....
    By shaggy411 in forum Ross University School of Medicine
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-26-2006, 09:56 PM
  2. at age 86, robert ross still has outsize dreams.
    By azskeptic in forum The Relaxing Lounge
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-19-2005, 03:52 PM
  3. Path Dreams
    By me2 in forum Residency Match Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-28-2005, 07:47 PM
  4. Nursing dreams that don't live up to reality
    By azskeptic in forum The Relaxing Lounge
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-18-2005, 08:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •