Advise for R.N.s turning M.D.
by Missionary Doc (no login)

Tanya, I agree with Dr Grimm and Observer with repect to your GPA. However, there is another obstacle you are facing (which you are probabaly aware of). That is that advanced allied health professionals have some of the lowest admissions rates to US and most other first-world indigenous medical schools.

The reasons for this lie in the inherent sense of justice felt by most people who sit admissions commitees. They reason something like this, usually below and not on the surface:

"This is a significant waste in the overall scheme of stewardship in training medical professionals. Why should the world have released to it in the end one physician rather than one nurse AND one physician?"

Get accustomed now to running up against that question--that potential opportunity squelcher--like a wall. As a nurse seeking to turn physician, it will be in many's mind, conscious or not, in many places you go.

Now what does this mean for you? Should you throw in the towel now and get a job at the nearest hospital as an R.N. or say yes to Saba right away? You my have better options.

One is to try and enter a US med school as has been mentioned. To do this, in your application essays and interviews YOU MUST HAVE AN EXCEPTIONALLY COMPELLING REASON FOR THE UPGRADE from nurse to doc. Not just, *it has always been in my heart* or *I think I can do more good as a doctor*, or the like. You MUST be the exception in life experience and life direction and life quest and in life giving so as to be an exception the low admission rates for R.N.s

I cannot tell you how to make yourself the exception to the bottleneck of nurses becoming docs because I do not know you, but can only say this unqueness must be made clear IN you, and clear to others with power to let you in or not. One quqick idea is to capitalize on the wellness issues of nursing as wholistic, and correlate it to the D.O. schools which have a quite correlative philosophy, and try to get in there. Aim your arrows well, as I say often.

Without the profound uniqueness, you will otherwise have a very, very tough time convincing admiss commitees of the need to invest all that is neccessary to improve you from nurse level to physician level. And, it will be a likely formidable sell, I believe, if another is vying for such appointment and support who is not as yet medically trained to such a level (i.e., nursing). You must be all the better than such and have an all the more compelling reason for them letting you, in particular, in.

Another option is to become an A.R.N.P. I personally have great respect for the work they do and have met truly outstanding troopers among their rank. Maybe it is for you...and it is not nearly as long (nor expensive) of a road to hoe.

And as you know, the carrib schools will always take you since the ethical dillemma raised in "This is a significant waste in the overall scheme of stewardship in training medical professionals. Why should the world have released to it in the end one physician rather than one nurse AND one physician?" is not always the foremost issues in their mind (not a comentary about any particualr school), but who can make it through the curriculum all the way and is thus a guaranteed income for us for four years.

I wish I had more time to give this important topic, and could write it more cohesively, but I need to go on to other things now....

Best wishes and keep us informed.


Posted on Nov 2, 1999, 9:30 AM
from IP address 209.215.55.30