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Thread: General Lodz advice

  1. #1
    ROBOMA is offline Newbie 511 points
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    General Lodz advice

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    Hi there!
    I am currently a student based in the UK, and am hoping to apply to Lodz 4-year MD for September admission.
    Obviously moving to Poland is a big commitment as I currently speak no Polish.
    I have some questions I am hoping current students will answer for me please...

    1) Is it easy to fit in, are there plenty of non-polish speaking students?
    2) What is the schedule of the course like? Do you find it tough to do social nights out and sports? Do they have university sports teams?
    3) Are lab sessions difficult? I come from a course with little lab hours and I am most nervous I may struggle to keep up with other more experienced students within these sessions. Could you tell me the standard of everyone and are there others you know of who may have struggled to begin. I am now improving lab skills in the mean time.
    4) Any other general stories/information would be greatly appreciated!!

    Thank you, looking forward to some responses!

  2. #2
    canadian_jerzyk is offline Junior Member 513 points
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    Hi,
    1) It is very easy for foreigners to fit in! Lodz is Poland's education capital. There are no fewer than 11 universities in the city so the locals are used to seeing plenty of young foreigners walking around. You are most likely to have at least one person in your class of Polish descent who speaks the language well enough to be able to help you with translation, either in the shops or in the clinical setting. Most young people who work in retail speak enough English to be able to sell you anything without ripping you off. You shouldn't have much trouble asking for directions either.

    2) The schedule differs from year to year and semester to semester. You will start off with a pretty rigid and rigorous schedule, but that's to be expected given all the core basic sciences that you must cover prior to commencing your clinical work in the second half of your studies. I'm not gonna lie to you, 1st year is all about survival! Don't get me wrong, it's not all about weeding out weak or lazy people, but you wouldn't be in medical school if your sights weren't set on having a realistic game plan toward passing your exams, right? Socializing is definitely possible, though I'd suggest saving that for the weekends. The university does have sports teams. They're semi-formally organized, that is, a group of interested students makes arrangements with the Dean's Office and the Polish students' athletic department for court/field time. All that you need to bring is a time commitment! Our teams have competed against teams of other universities throughout Poland, especially in football and basketball.

    3) Traditional lab exercises are restricted to the Biochemistry and Biophysics classes, both of which you'll have in 1st year. However, the experiments you'll do in Biochem are very simple spectroscopic determinations of unknown chemical concentrations: nowhere near as difficult as titrations or organic chem syntheses. In Biophysics, the formulas and equipment are more intimidating than the procedures. They tell you exactly what to do, you just plug in the numbers, and write a short conclusion. You need not worry too much about basic lab skills, but if you're concerned then practice your micropipetting! Those are the only precise instruments you'll be using in each lab. If you're like me and you like accummulating lab marks by writing fancy lab reports, I'm sorry to say that you won't be writing any formal reports at all in your regular classes as a medical student. You will, however, be preparing plenty of PowerPoint presentations, especially in your clinical years!

    4) The most important thing I can tell you about being a member of the MUL student body is that you'll never be just a number. There are only a couple hundred of us and most people know most other people. Specifically, not including this year's 1st year class, the 4-MD program will only be about 45-50 people in total in the 3 upper classes at the beginning of the 2014-15 academic year.

    I hope that covers some of what you were wondering!
    Last edited by canadian_jerzyk; 02-20-2014 at 02:25 AM.
    2014-2015 Medical Intern

  3. #3
    ROBOMA is offline Newbie 511 points
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    Thank you so much for spending time answering this, it was incredibly helpful! That has covered everything for now
    canadian_jerzyk likes this.

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