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  1. #1
    watchdog is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Medical education is now going through its Garb-age IN BARBADOS!

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    The world has gone through the Ice-age ,Stone-age and Bronze-age .
    Medical education is now going through its Garb-age IN BARBADOS!

    At a time when the Barbados Government is cash strapped and has no money to replace its fleet of dysfunctional garbage trucks, the garbage is not being collected in Barbados for several weeks.

    The rats are taking over the garbage dumps.

    It is into this environment that Barbados welcomes 1500 Ross students along with those of about 5 other offshore medical schools.

    Prospective students are warned that coming to Barbados to study you are running the risk of contracting leptospirosis.

    Caveat emptor!

  2. #2
    Doc Mobile is offline Member 510 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by watchdog View Post
    The world has gone through the Ice-age ,Stone-age and Bronze-age .
    Medical education is now going through its Garb-age IN BARBADOS!

    At a time when the Barbados Government is cash strapped and has no money to replace its fleet of dysfunctional garbage trucks, the garbage is not being collected in Barbados for several weeks.

    The rats are taking over the garbage dumps.

    It is into this environment that Barbados welcomes 1500 Ross students along with those of about 5 other offshore medical schools.

    Prospective students are warned that coming to Barbados to study you are running the risk of contracting leptospirosis.

    Caveat emptor!
    Why Barbados?

  3. #3
    watchdog is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Medical education in Barbados began in 1967 with the implementation of the Eastern Carribbean Medical Scheme of the UWI MEDICAL SCHOOL. Students were allowed to do their final (clinical) year at the QEH, or in Trinidad. In 1976 students were allowed to do their final (clinical) year at the QEH, or in Trinidad. Eventually in 2008 the third full UWI school began in Barbados.

    The first offshore "medical school" was launched in Barbados at the beginning of 2012, as the DLP government of Barbados became increasingly cash strapped. As the economic fortunes of the island declined more and more of these schools have made their appearance in Barbados, and eventually the new Barbados government has been accused of "poaching" Ross medical school from the hapless Dominicans.

    One of the offshore "medical schools" launched in Barbados in 2017, has already gone bell up and its principal officers arrested and actually tasted jail for allegedly defrauding his 200 students and not paying his bills. It was reported that some parents and some students who lost their money in this enterprise committed suicide, and that some were admitted in a school in the contiguous island of St Lucia. This school has certainly seen better days and is currently struggling to make ends meet.

    It is sad to see Barbados in the financial hubris in which it finds itself, such that it is entertaining the presence of schools of dubious quality, in the hope of gaining foreign exchange, at a time when there have been massive lay offs, the worse bus service ever seen in its history, as well as the fact that the current lengthy spell of poor garbage collection presents a great health hazard ready to happen at any time! This is no place for an influx of unsuspecting medical students.

    The increase of daily robberies and murders adds to the dismay, as Barbados has reached its lowest ebb, and there seems that there is no one on the island who can correct these maladies.

    The new Government is yet to properly fix the broken sewage system to the south of the country where raw faeculent material has been spewing on the the public roads for the last 2 years, and causing some beaches to be closed.

    Because of the ensuing and expected decline in tourists, the Government is now seeking to bring students to the country as long stay tourists.

    Students must think of their health, and seek their education on other islands.

    Students at medical schools in Barbados should petition their schools to transfer elsewhere.

  4. #4
    watchdog is offline Newbie 510 points
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    the trouble start already and the semester has not started yet

    Quote Originally Posted by watchdog View Post
    Medical education in Barbados began in 1967 with the implementation of the Eastern Carribbean Medical Scheme of the UWI MEDICAL SCHOOL. Students were allowed to do their final (clinical) year at the QEH, or in Trinidad. In 1976 students were allowed to do their final (clinical) year at the QEH, or in Trinidad. Eventually in 2008 the third full UWI school began in Barbados.

    The first offshore "medical school" was launched in Barbados at the beginning of 2012, as the DLP government of Barbados became increasingly cash strapped. As the economic fortunes of the island declined more and more of these schools have made their appearance in Barbados, and eventually the new Barbados government has been accused of "poaching" Ross medical school from the hapless Dominicans.

    One of the offshore "medical schools" launched in Barbados in 2017, has already gone bell up and its principal officers arrested and actually tasted jail for allegedly defrauding his 200 students and not paying his bills. It was reported that some parents and some students who lost their money in this enterprise committed suicide, and that some were admitted in a school in the contiguous island of St Lucia. This school has certainly seen better days and is currently struggling to make ends meet.

    It is sad to see Barbados in the financial hubris in which it finds itself, such that it is entertaining the presence of schools of dubious quality, in the hope of gaining foreign exchange, at a time when there have been massive lay offs, the worse bus service ever seen in its history, as well as the fact that the current lengthy spell of poor garbage collection presents a great health hazard ready to happen at any time! This is no place for an influx of unsuspecting medical students.

    The increase of daily robberies and murders adds to the dismay, as Barbados has reached its lowest ebb, and there seems that there is no one on the island who can correct these maladies.

    The new Government is yet to properly fix the broken sewage system to the south of the country where raw faeculent material has been spewing on the the public roads for the last 2 years, and causing some beaches to be closed.

    Because of the ensuing and expected decline in tourists, the Government is now seeking to bring students to the country as long stay tourists.

    Students must think of their health, and seek their education on other islands.

    Students at medical schools in Barbados should petition their schools to transfer elsewhere.

    8





    A large portion of the estimated $100 million injection into the local economy from the presence of the Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) will go toward their housing accommodation at the sprawling Villages at Coverley. Students are to pay between US$4,040 and US$4,840 per semester or BDS$2020-$2420 each month per student.

    Each unit at Coverley is set up to accommodate three or four students, this means each student will be paying over US$1,000 in rent per month for the four months of each semester.
    This could easily translate into more than US$4 million per semester or over US$12 million per year in rent for the approximately 1,000 registered students assuming the minimum three-student occupancy and the lowest associated rent.

    And the students are expressing disappointment at the apparent ‘mandatory’ arrangement which gives them no leeway to find competitive lodging on their own.

    According to irate students, the university is requiring “all full-time students enrolled in the Medical Sciences 4- or 5-semester curriculum, to reside in RUSM on-campus housing, located at the Villages at Coverley”. This was not the case when they attended the school based in Dominica said the irate returning student, livid at the change of process.

    According to the RUSM website, there are four options for accommodation within the Coverley community, ranging from three-bedroom units and four-bedroom units, with shared or private bathrooms, with prices from US$4,040 to US$4,840 per semester, per student.

    There are also three-bedroom family units, which will be rented for US$8,640 per semester.

    According to the university, “Rent includes property management, exterior and interior maintenance, personal property insurance, deep cleaning between each semester, Wi-fi, trash pickup, monthly utility allotment (water, electric and sewer), parking and gym membership.”

    “Non-student companions approved to share a bedroom in a general student unit pay US$500/semester amenities and administration fee,” it added.

    Barbados TODAY investigations revealed that some students were either not willing to pay the price being asked or simply wanted to live elsewhere on island and had therefore applied for housing exemption but were not approved and told that “there is not an appeals process”.

    According to the RUSM Housing Exemption request form “A student may be granted an exemption to this requirement by the Associate Dean of Student Affairs or designee. All requests are processed on a case-by-case basis.”

    Barbados TODAY understands that some students had raised concerns about the pricing while a handful of them had applied for “housing exemption”, meaning they would prefer to rent accommodation elsewhere so they could have the full “island experience” while living amongst regular residents ‘like we did in Dominica’.

    According to concerned students, who wished not to be identified, living arrangements in Dominica were different, and on-campus housing could go from US$450 to over US$650 per month per student, while off-campus rent could reach over US$800. Each student had the option of renting solo.

    The students said they simply felt “entrapped”, explaining that they were initially told that living at the Villages at Coverley was not mandatory, but this later changed.
    “After all our [proposed] hosts submitted all their very personal information that Ross asked for to house us – citizenship proof, passport information – then they denied everyone,” the students complained.

    Students seeking to get housing exemptions in Barbados for the Spring 2019 semester had to fully complete and submit a form along with supporting documents by November 25, 2018.
    However, any current or incoming students who were not granted housing exemption “will be assigned on-campus housing automatically and charged accordingly”, the form stated with the warning that “Decisions made by the Housing Exemption Committee are final.”

    Information provided on the form as reasons for exemption include: accompanying companions/dependents whose needs cannot be met by RUSM Student Housing; local national or living with local family in Barbados; medical reason and/or disability that cannot be accommodated within the RUSM on-campus housing.
    Following Hurricane Maria’s devastation of Dominica in September 2017, Adtalem Global Education, the parent company of RUSM, agreed to host the students at the Villages at Coverley come January 2019.
    Between September 2017 and December 2018, continuing students, most of whom are from the US and Canada, were being housed between Knoxville, Tennessee and St Kitts, where they were said they also had “the freedom of choice”.

    They said since raising the concern about accommodation costs and not being able to freely choose where to live, the university has been less than accommodating.
    They said the “RUSM in Knoxville” Facebook page, where they also aired their concerns, was deleted.
    “Our concerns are usually never resolved. We are always told that we are complaining too much and that we ‘should be grateful that Ross is providing’ these things for us,” said one student.
    “Not only are we not given the choice, but this also hurts the rental property owners of the area that will not benefit from students being able to use their properties to accommodate their personal lifestyle,” the student added.

    In addition to accommodation, students also pay tuition fee of more than US$23,000, US$700 in health insurance and a student services fee of US$900. There is a one-time application fee of US$250, electronic materials fee of US$400 and pet fee of US$500.

    When Barbados TODAY reached out to officials of Adtalem Global Education regarding the students’ concerns, the university did not directly answer the questions posed.
    However, in a short response, the officials said “very few” students applied for housing exemption from among the more than 1,000 registered.

    “The Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) is a modern living-learning community. As such, RUSM students are enthused about our new Barbados instructional campus, housing and neighbourhood amenities. Because access to living-learning communities are preferred by many students, they are not unusual as a resource for the first two years of graduate medical education,” the statement said.
    “RUSM implemented an exception process for those few students with other needs. All requests for exemption are individually reviewed; there have been very few among our (more than) 1,000 students registered,” it added, without saying if any, or how many students were granted exemption.

    “I don’t think Ross can dictate where US, Barbados or other nationals can live. They kept changing the rules, got our hopes up then denied nearly 100 per cent,” one student told Barbados TODAY.
    It was during a press conference in August that Prime Minister Mia Mottley announced that the relocation of the Ross University to Barbados should result in a $100 million injection into the local economy.
    Besides rentals, the Massy Supermarket in Coverley is also in line to benefit significantly from the students’ grocery shopping.

    In addition to the over 1,000 students, some 100 faculty and 200 administrative support staff are to also find accommodation at the Coverley development.
    It is not immediately clear how much money has been spent on the development of the school itself to be located at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre.
    The school’s official opening will take place on Saturday, January 5, 2019.

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