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  1. #1
    Snowybluesky is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Should I go for an EU medical degree or USA bioscience masters?

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    I want to work in research against disease/aging (preclinical or clinical) in the USA, from what I read online its best to have either bioscience PhD or MD (for research) for this.

    Problem: My parents have told me they will only fund my education if I am within Europe.(I have both Polish-EU/American citizenship)


    1) To study in the USA, I could self fund for a school like Rutgers (NJ) to get an integrated masters after 5 years in a bioscience, however, I would not be able to afford further PhD or MD study.

    2) To study in the EU, I would most likely apply for a 6 year MD program at a university including Jagiellon Medical College (Jagiellon specifically because I speak Polish and this is what my parents are hammering on me).

    3) As well, I could get a BSc from the UK in a bioscience and then attempt to apply for an MSc in the USA (this would put significantly less strain on my budget, but I don't know how this would turn out career wise).


    In terms of pursuing my research goals, would a USA masters or an MD from a non-USA country be more valuable?

    Thanks for any advice - I am at a mental crossroads the width of the Atlantic.



    Other things I have thought about:

    While generally MD>MSc, I read on this forum that Polish medical degrees make life difficult in America in terms of finding a job.

    Then I factor in that if the economy were to suddenly decline, I think it would probably be easier to get a job in the USA as a physician (with an MD) than as a researcher with an MSc.

    I could probably negotiate for partial funding for a USA education with my parents, but this would probably make me unable to attend summer internships.

    My parents would probably fund me to do a 4 year graduate entry MD program in the EU after I would self fund a BSc in the USA, (but I don't know if this option has an value to it).
    Last edited by Snowybluesky; 02-13-2019 at 07:55 AM.

  2. #2
    cakepops is offline Junior Member 511 points
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    Hello, I think since you want to work in research and not in patient care, it would not make sense to do a 6 year gruelling MD program at Jagiellon.
    I think you should look into programs within the UK, and Ireland for a 3 year undergraduate degree because you will get EU tuition and support to pay your fees from the EU government, and your parents. (I believe since Britain is leaving the EU the 2019/2020 academic year is the last year of support offered for EU citizens studying in the UK. This means that 2022 is last year EU will cover students). Take advantage of this while you can.

    Additionally, programs in the UK and Ireland are more respected back in North America. Afterwards, you can decide to either do a research degree in the EU or North America. PhD programs in science are usually funded in the US.

    So, If I were you I would do this:

    3 year degree in England, Scotland, Wales, or Ireland where I could get EU tuition until 2022 plus have the support of my parents if I start 2019/2020 academic year. Then a PhD in the US which is fully funded. Masters degree programs aren't needed in the US to get into a PhD program. As well, masters programs are usually expensive and unfunded, many students take out loans to cover the cost of the masters program.

    Check out this website offering free services for studying in the UK: https://www.studyacrossthepond.com/
    Last edited by cakepops; 02-13-2019 at 03:14 PM.

  3. #3
    Snowybluesky is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Thanks for the response.

    You noted that a 6 year MD program would be disproportionately hard for non-patient research. Assuming program difficulty is not a factor (even though I know its grueling), do you think a 6-year MD would make it easier or harder to get a job/funding than a US masters? I say this because while many PhD programs in America are funded, I am kind of turned off by the 5-8 year duration spent after an initial 3-4 years of a BSc. I don't think masters funding in the US would be that hard to cover in a 4+1 program that Rutgers offers where I think its less expensive.

    My main concern with studying in the UK is I read online that graduate programs in the US aren't kind to 3 year degrees. But I don't know if that difference is worth self funding my undergraduate level. I know that UK programs are definitely more respected in the USA than Poland, but I think Poland's medical and general college system aligns better with the US.

  4. #4
    cakepops is offline Junior Member 511 points
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    I am not really sure how jobs would look at receiving a 6 year MD, and then you not practicing afterwards. If you chose this route, I would suggest supplementing your MD degree with lots of research experience throughout.

    I personally think you should apply to the Rutgers 4 + 1 program and programs abroad (UK, Ireland) to cover all of your bases. I would also look further into these 4 + 1 programs in the US because there seems to be quite a few of these programs where you can get funding from the school and the government. I think it's important to apply first to programs and then assess your options based off of your acceptances. It'll be much easier for you to narrow down.

    Additionally, I am not sure if you want to work in a governmental organization or what role you wish to attain but many of my friends just completing a bachelors work in research. For example, one girl I know did a BA in psychology and she works at UCLA in an electrophysiology lab monitoring patients with epilepsy, collecting and analyzing data as a research associate. She even has a few papers. Another girl I know did a BA in public health and worked at Sinai as research coordinator for a project on nutrition in inner city New York. They received these jobs right out of college. That's also something to think about.

    As well, it's important to note: No one is ever going to frown on a degree from Oxford, Cambridge, or the University of London. If anything, they will be more impressed. Check out Imperial College London, it's fairly strong in the sciences.
    Last edited by cakepops; 02-15-2019 at 12:52 PM.

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