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Thread: How to make strong CV?

  1. #1
    TAJIK's Avatar
    TAJIK is offline Junior Member 513 points
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    How to make strong CV?

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    Hi there. I am a first year medical student in one of the Turkish med schools (which are considered as EU med schools)
    after graduating from my school I want to do my residency in USA. So what and when should I do in order to make strong CV?
    Regards

    P.S: I was a partisipand and honarable metion holder of International Mendeleev Chemistry Olympiad, have graduated from high school with GPA of 4.00. have participated at some chemistry workshops... and my GPA at my med school is 3.00 now.

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    Tricuspid is offline Member 535 points
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    You'll want to start doing observerships in the US and do electives in your final year in the US. Also just make sure ur a top student at your medical school.
    Cardiothoracic Surgery Resident

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    devildoc8404's Avatar
    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    Remember also that, unless your medical school has an official relationship with a US medical school, you will most likely not be allowed to complete any rotations until you are in the final year of medical school. Laboratory research might be different, if you complete it during school vacations or something, but you will need to check that out individually.

    As far as creating a good CV, the stuff you have done is great. You just need more of it. Volunteer work, research publications, public service efforts, and stuff like that will help a lot.

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
    ."
    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


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    TAJIK's Avatar
    TAJIK is offline Junior Member 513 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by devildoc8404 View Post
    Remember also that, unless your medical school has an official relationship with a US medical school, you will most likely not be allowed to complete any rotations until you are in the final year of medical school. Laboratory research might be different, if you complete it during school vacations or something, but you will need to check that out individually.

    As far as creating a good CV, the stuff you have done is great. You just need more of it. Volunteer work, research publications, public service efforts, and stuff like that will help a lot.
    thanks for all of u guys. What about GPA? mainly how CV is avualeted, I mean social vs academic?(In percents?)

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    devildoc8404's Avatar
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    Of course GPA is important... and your USMLE scores will be, as well.

    There is no set "percentage" for the evaluation of a CV. It varies. Some programs will place more weight on academics and test scores, at least initially, while others will consider different variables important.

    There is also no specific format for writing a CV, but when the time comes you should select a professional one.

    FWIW, my CV is divided into the following segments:
    Academics, Professional Work, Research, Awards, Publications, Volunteer Work, Language Skills, Personal Information

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
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    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


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    TAJIK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by devildoc8404 View Post
    Of course GPA is important... and your USMLE scores will be, as well.

    There is no set "percentage" for the evaluation of a CV. It varies. Some programs will place more weight on academics and test scores, at least initially, while others will consider different variables important.

    There is also no specific format for writing a CV, but when the time comes you should select a professional one.

    FWIW, my CV is divided into the following segments:
    Academics, Professional Work, Research, Awards, Publications, Volunteer Work, Language Skills, Personal Information
    I got it. What do u think about 3.50 GPA? Is it good enough?

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    Good enough for what?

    Do you mean for the US residency match? In that case it depends on specialty, program, USMLE scores, and a host of other factors discussed ad nauseam here on VMD... not to mention the fact that you will be trying to match after 2016, which is supposed to make things considerably tighter for non-citizens/Green Card holders.

    Do you mean for clinical rotations? Probably, but that depends again on specialty and program, as well as whether or not you can get a visa and a bunch of other logistical issues.

    Do you mean for a short term research position? I have absolutely no idea, but I would imagine that the same principles apply.

    Regardless, I would imagine that the competition for the tougher specialties will likely mostly have university GPAs higher than 3.50. For one thing, it requires an excellent university GPA in the US to get into medical school at all, and then many medical schools use a honors/pass/fail grading system, so there is no real "GPA" once they get into medical school.

    Remember that you are applying from a completely different educational system, so everything does not match up exactly.

    "When I haven't any
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    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
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    TAJIK's Avatar
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    Good enough for rotations and residency match for surgery mainly.
    BTW devildoc do u mean that for US medical garduates there is no need for GPA they just need to pass their classes?

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    No. There is a HUGE need for a high GPA, because they cannot get into medical school without it. PLUS they need high MCAT scores. PLUS they need extracurricular activities. And all of this is before they even start medical school, because the US is on the 4-plus-4 system (4 years undergraduate university PLUS 4 years of medical school). If a student does not have a high GPA at undergraduate university, then he or she will have basically zero chance of getting into medical school afterward. Students on the European model get into medical school right out of high school and do not have that second proving ground, for better or for worse.

    What I am saying is that there are many medical schools in the US that do not have an A-B-C-D-F grading scale. Many offer an Honors-Pass-Fail system (some of the Ivy League medical schools are even Pass-Fail), and do not calculate a GPA during medical school at all. It depends on the medical school. Regardless, the people who are going for surgery in the US will tend to have excellent academic records both in undergraduate and in medical school. Surgical specialties tend to be highly competitive in the US, and this is especially true for FMGs. They will be looking at an FMGs GPA (although that can be strange because not all of them are on a 4.00 scale), but they will mainly be looking at USMLE scores. That is the one apples-to-apples comparison that they can make between candidates... it is not perfect, but it is the best comparison available.

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
    ."
    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


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    leadsled is offline Senior Member
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    I would start by looking at CV's from Faculty Physicians at a variety of medical schools and/or hospitals. Here is a link for an excellent resource in crafting a CV.

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...55819444,d.aWc


    Research is important as well. Have you considered taking the free online
    Protecting Human Subject Research Participants course?

    http://phrp.nihtraining.com/users/login.php


    I have a half a dozen clinical research projects on my CV that always catch an eye in a job interview!

    I don't mention my continuing education much on the CV but I have seen some that make a column for it! In any case, Medscape offers numerous CME courses for free that will keep you up to date! So many new treatment modalities are coming forth everyday! For example, I just took a CME on SGLT1 inhibitors for the treatment of Diabetes. This stuff is amazing and I got a free education! I also took some courses online from Harvard Medical School continuing education, not free but excellent!
    link:
    HMS-CME

    Also, being a member of a professional group is important! It shows support for the profession. Example: Student Affiliate - American College of Surgeons.

    In addition, community/volunteer work is awesome! There are so many "free clinics" nowadays that provide you an opportunity to translate, do labs, take vitals, etc. In addition, you make friends and have a resource for letters of recommendations from a variety of Family Med, Peds and IM Physicians.
    Last edited by leadsled; 11-02-2013 at 12:04 PM.

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