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Thread: Undergrad Student in US. I need info on how to transfer, etc.

  1. #1
    KirstenH is offline Newbie 511 points
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    Undergrad Student in US. I need info on how to transfer, etc.

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    Hi everyone. Currently, I am a biology major college student. I will graduate with 90 credits instead of 60 credits because it is recommended and I will receive a diploma. I am hoping to transfer to a graduate school in Europe. What are the requirements of most medical schools in EU? Which one is more promising; dentist or dermatologist? I also need your recommendation.. Top medical schools in EU? I would appreciate it if you list it in order. It would be best if the unis have dorms but its okay if they dont. Money is not a problem for me but is it true that most of the unis in EU are free? Is there any uni in EU that offers scholarship programs? The environment matters the most. It doesnt have to be beautiful or anything. Just need a safe and clean surroundings By the way, I plan to stay in the Europe. Is it easy to apply for residency? When is the best time to apply for it? And what are the countries in EU easiest to apply for residency? Oh and can anyone explain the difference between the 4 year and 6 year MD thingy? Which one is better? Please tell me everything I need to know! Thank you in advance for your infos!
    Last edited by KirstenH; 07-19-2012 at 07:50 PM.

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    devildoc8404's Avatar
    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    I will graduate with 90 credits instead of 60 credits because it is recommended and I will receive a diploma. I am hoping to transfer to a graduate school in Europe.

    If you graduate, then you are not transferring. You are then applying to a new program. FWIW, graduate school is not usually medical school in Europe, by the way. It might seem like a semantic difference, but it actually matters. If you ask an EU university about its graduate school they will usually not think that you want to study medicine there.

    What are the requirements of most medical schools in EU?

    Most of the EU medical schools are 6-years in length and designed for students coming out of high school. However, North American students with bachelor's degrees still do complete these programs. If you have studied biology then your undergrad should stand you in good stead. A few programs are 4-years in length for people who have completed a bachelor's degree and the premedical science classes. There are also a couple of 5-year programs in Ireland and the UK for people with bachelor's degrees who have not completed all of the premedical science classes.

    Which one is more promising; dentist or dermatologist?

    Wait... what? Dentists attend dental school. Dermatologists attend medical school and then complete a dermatology residency, but there is almost zero chance of obtaining a derm residency in the US if you attend a foreign medical school... or even as a foreigner in a W-EU country. Derm is killer competitive just about anyplace.

    Frankly, it would be advisable to actually decide what you want to do as a profession, and then perhaps research things out a bit more, here.

    I also need your recommendation.. Top medical schools in EU? I would appreciate it if you list it in order.

    That is kind of impossible. You have given no criteria by which to judge the "top schools." Also, are you only talking about English-speaking programs? Because let's be honest, many of the best EU medical schools are not taught in English, and you have not mentioned whether you are a polyglot or not.

    It would be best if the unis have dorms but its okay if they dont.

    That is not usually a criteria for selecting a top medical school.

    Money is not a problem for me but is it true that most of the unis in EU are free?

    No, and especially not as a foreign applicant. However, some countries' medical schools are very inexpensive, if you can gain admission, but in every case those inexpensive schools require fluency in a language other than English.

    Is there any uni in EU that offers scholarship programs?

    Generally not to a North American student without EU citizenship, no.

    The environment matters the most. It doesnt have to be beautiful or anything. Just need a safe and clean surroundings

    That applies to many European cities, fortunately.

    By the way, I plan to stay in the Europe. Is it easy to apply for residency?

    Do you mean residency training, or permanent residency?

    When is the best time to apply for it? And what are the countries in EU easiest to apply for residency?

    Assuming you mean permanent residency, time spent as a student in a country rarely counts toward permanent residency or naturalization. You would need to start the clock for that AFTER medical school. Also, in Europe, you generally need to speak the language in a country in order to naturalize there... that is a pretty significant consideration. The relatively shorter wait for citizenship application in Belgium is of little use to you if you can't speak French, Flemish/Dutch, or German, nor is the significantly longer wait in Switzerland if you can't speak German, French, Italian, or Romansch.

    Oh and can anyone explain the difference between the 4 year and 6 year MD thingy? Which one is better?

    The thingy?

    Well, one program is shorter. One program is longer. They both lead to a medical degree, and they are essentially equivalent qualifications. If you already have a bachelor's degree, though, why spend an extra two years relearning stuff?

    Please tell me everything I need to know! Thank you in advance for your infos!

    No offense intended, here, but you kind of need to utilize the search function a little bit. There is a pantload of information on VMD, answering virtually any question you could come up with. If you want to be a doctor, you'll have to learn stuff ("Tell me everything I need to know" is a bit ridiculous, isn't it? Part of the process is researching things out without being spoon fed.)

    Good luck to you.

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
    ."
    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


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    KirstenH is offline Newbie 511 points
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    Thank you for replying. I'm sorry that I'm not clear with my questions. I'm an international student so my english is not that good. Okay then that means I'm not transferring. I'm confused. I thought graduate school and medical school are the same. I have made up my mind that I would like to attend a med school (nvm about dental school) in Germany, Sweden, Italy, Ireland or Switzerland, I dont mind learning a new language for a year before attending a uni that doesnt use English. I'll do my research now. Thank you again for your time.
    Last edited by KirstenH; 07-20-2012 at 08:30 PM.

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    Not to worry, KirstenH, everybody has questions about this process. I certainly did, and still do.

    No, graduate school in Europe is generally intended to lead to a master's or PhD degree. Specifically ask about medical school so they know precisely to which faculty you wish to apply.

    Germany would be a terrific option if you can gain admission there -- the only drawback would be the time learning the language, as well as whether or not you would be accepted there. You can get more information about German medical school through DAAD. Ireland is also excellent, albeit more expensive. Application to Irish schools is through an organization called Atlantic Bridge. As a side bonus, almost all of the schools in both of these countries are 50-state approved if you ever want to complete residency in the States, as well.

    Italy does have a few programs accepting foreign medical students, but they are newer and generally seem to be far less organized. I would recommend targeting the German and Irish options -- that is what I would do, if I were applying again.

    Unfortunately, Sweden and Switzerland are both very unlikely to accept non-citizens into their medical schools, no matter how well you speak the language.

    If you are an international student, how about considering some medical schools in your country of origin (assuming it is not one of the five listed above), as well?

    Good luck with your research and applications, I wish you well.
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    "When I haven't any
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    Riften is offline Junior Member 513 points
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    It's the best to attend medical school in a country in which you have citizenship/permanent residency. Ex, US citizens attend US medical schools, EU citizens attend EU medical schools. The thing is, after medical school, you need to residency. I heard in Ireland, UK, and Italy, you need to be EU citizens to participate in residency programs. It's impossible if you are non EU (because you need a work permit and it's second priority).

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    KirstenH is offline Newbie 511 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by devildoc8404 View Post
    Not to worry, KirstenH, everybody has questions about this process. I certainly did, and still do.

    No, graduate school in Europe is generally intended to lead to a master's or PhD degree. Specifically ask about medical school so they know precisely to which faculty you wish to apply.

    Germany would be a terrific option if you can gain admission there -- the only drawback would be the time learning the language, as well as whether or not you would be accepted there. You can get more information about German medical school through DAAD. Ireland is also excellent, albeit more expensive. Application to Irish schools is through an organization called Atlantic Bridge. As a side bonus, almost all of the schools in both of these countries are 50-state approved if you ever want to complete residency in the States, as well.

    Italy does have a few programs accepting foreign medical students, but they are newer and generally seem to be far less organized. I would recommend targeting the German and Irish options -- that is what I would do, if I were applying again.

    Unfortunately, Sweden and Switzerland are both very unlikely to accept non-citizens into their medical schools, no matter how well you speak the language.

    If you are an international student, how about considering some medical schools in your country of origin (assuming it is not one of the five listed above), as well?

    Good luck with your research and applications, I wish you well.
    Thank you so much for the information! German shall be my first choice then. What about Norway sir? Do they accept non-citizens into their med school? It has always been my dream to study overseas and learn new languages so my country's med school is my last option hehe. Once again, thank you! Have a nice day!
    Last edited by KirstenH; 07-26-2012 at 11:09 PM.

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    KirstenH is offline Newbie 511 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riften View Post
    It's the best to attend medical school in a country in which you have citizenship/permanent residency. Ex, US citizens attend US medical schools, EU citizens attend EU medical schools. The thing is, after medical school, you need to residency. I heard in Ireland, UK, and Italy, you need to be EU citizens to participate in residency programs. It's impossible if you are non EU (because you need a work permit and it's second priority).
    Oh no.. Ireland and Italy? Thank you for letting me know. Have a nice day!

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    Riften is offline Junior Member 513 points
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    It's the best you go to a med located in your country of citizenship. For ex, US citizens go to a US med school, UK citizens attend a UK med school. The problem is, you need go through post-grad training (residency), unlike you have a Phd and doing a post-doc, residency programs at almost every country first give prefernces to the citizens/permanent residents of thier own country.

    If you really want to do medicine, it's the best bet you study medicine in your home country and finish residency training there. The worst senario can be, finish medical school in a country you don't have citizenship and you can't get a residency anywhere, then your money is totally wasted.

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    devildoc8404's Avatar
    devildoc8404 is offline Ultimate Member 12699 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riften View Post
    The thing is, after medical school, you need to residency. I heard in Ireland, UK, and Italy, you need to be EU citizens to participate in residency programs. It's impossible if you are non EU (because you need a work permit and it's second priority).
    What you heard was only partially correct. As you are no doubt aware, the EU is a delightful conglomeration of countries, and they do not all have the same circumstances when it comes to non-EU citizens and residency training.

    1) In the UK, it's virtually impossible to get specialization training if you are not a EU citizen.
    2) I frankly do not know anything about Italy, since I do not speak Italian and have no desire to train there.
    3) In Ireland, it depends on the specialty. Some will accept non-EU applicants, and others will not.
    4) In other countries, like Germany, it is very possible for a non-EU citizen to get an Assistenzarztstelle (residency position) if s/he speaks German very well and knows his/her stuff.
    5) In E-EU countries you might well be able to get a position if you learn the language there, but they charge tuition for residency training. These countries are usually poorer and do not pay their residency staff.
    6) In still other countries, like Sweden, there is no opportunity available for residency training there unless you are a Swedish citizen (specifically SWEDISH, not just EU)... but if you complete residency training elsewhere in the EU they will consider you for employment there as a doctor, even without EU citizenship.

    Hope that helps a bit.

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
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    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
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    devildoc8404's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KirstenH View Post
    Thank you so much for the information! German shall be my first choice then. What about Norway sir? Do they accept non-citizens into their med school? It has always been my dream to study overseas and learn new languages so my country's med school is my last option hehe. Once again, thank you! Have a nice day!
    Germany is tough, but possible. Definitely check out DAAD and look at all of the requirements.

    It is my understanding that Norway (and the rest of Scandinavia) accepts no foreign students into their medical schools, and getting residency programs as a foreigner there is almost impossible as well. (I did see one residency position posted in Denmark a few months back, though, so there are exceptions apparently.)

    This is one reason that there are so many Swedish and Norwegian students studying in medical schools in other parts of the EU.

    You have a great day, too.

    "When I haven't any
    blue... I use red
    ."
    - Pablo Picasso

    BA - Oregon MS - BYU MD - MU-Sofia
    Clinical Research Fellow / Resident
    Fleet Marine Force Hospital Corpsman 1996-2003


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