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Links in Category: Fungi

The kingdom Fungi comprises not only the more familiar mushrooms and toadstools but also lichens, moulds, rusts, smuts and rot. In fact what we see are the fruiting bodies of the fungi,these being supported by a network of root-like strands called hyphae beneath the surface. Most fungi are saprobes, breaking down organic material and especially wood. Some are parasites and may be significant agents of plant or animal disease and some form a mutually beneficial relationship with the roots of plants. The phylum Basidiomycota includes the common mushrooms and toadstools, puffballs and bracket fungi and the phylum Ascomycota includes truffles, morels and other fungi with cup-shaped, club-shaped or various strangely-shaped fruiting bodies. There is great diversity in shape of these and their appearance may not be a good guide to their classification. The other main phyla are the Zygomycota or pin-moulds and the Chytridiomycota whose members are mostly aquatic, some being parasites. Modern genetic analysis is showing unexpected relationships between disparate groups and demonstrating that what had been thought to be closely related groups are actually far apart. The Fungi are now thought to be more closely related to the animal kingdom than the plant kingdom. Subcategories are organized according to the taxon tree: - Divisions -- Families --- Genera

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  1. Ascomycota

    The Ascomycota are the largest group of fungi, with over 32,000 species. They can be identified by their possession of the ascus, a pod-like container of spores and can also reproduce asexually by segmentation of the hyphae to form conidiospores. Most are mycorrhizal and almost half of the known species form lichens. They range from single cell yeasts through moulds, like Penicillium, to the morels and truffles with their large fruiting bodies.

    Ajellomycetaceae
    Botryosphaeriaceae
    Bulgariaceae
    Clavicipitaceae
    Cudoniaceae
    Cyttariaceae
    Dermateaceae
    Discinaceae
    Elaphomycetaceae
    Erysiphaceae
    Helotiaceae
    Helvellaceae
    Hemiphacidiaceae
    Hypocreaceae
    Hyponectriaceae
    Lasiosphaeriaceae
    Leotiaceae
    Morchellaceae
    Mycosphaerellaceae
    Myxotrichaceae
    Nectriaceae
    Ophiostomataceae
    Pezizaceae
    Pleosporaceae
    Pyronemataceae
    Saccharomycetaceae
    Sarcoscyphaceae
    Sarcosomataceae
    Sclerotiniaceae
    Sordariaceae
    Trichocomaceae
    Venturiaceae
    Xylariaceae

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  2. Basidiomycota

    Basidiomycota is a phylum in the kingdom Fungi. The characteristic reproductive body is the basidium, the truncheon-like bearer of spores. The basidia are contained in an intricate supporting structure as seen in the mushroom or puffball. Most of the familiar mushrooms and toadstools are included in this phylum, along with bracket fungi, jelly fungi, smuts and rusts.

    Agaricales
    Atheliales
    Auriculariales
    Boletales
    Cantharellales
    Ceratobasidiales
    Cystofilobasidiales
    Dacrymycetales
    Filobasidiales
    Geastrales
    Gloeophyllales
    Gomphales
    Hymenochaetales
    Hysterangiales
    Phallales
    Polyporales
    Russulales
    Techisporales
    Thelephorales
    Tilletiales
    Tremellales
    Tulasnellales
    Uredinales
    Ustilaginales

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    Agaricus Family

    by Medical Links 12-16-2014 05:06 AM
  3. Chytridiomycota

    The Chytridiomycota are a group of fungi with about 100 genera. Members of the phylum are simple in form, their hyphae lacking septa, and with simple fruiting bodies. Chytrids produce motile gametes which distinguish them from other fungi. They mainly live in fresh water but some live in the soil, some in the guts of herbivores, some are saprobes and others parasites on nematodes, insects, plants or other fungi.

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  4. Deuteromycota

    The fungi are traditionally classified according to the micro-anatomy of their fruiting bodies, the familiar mushrooms and toadstools. However there are some species that are only known to reproduce asexually and so never form a fruiting body, making it difficult to classify them. These include about 25,000 species and are often given the group name Deuteromycota or the Fungi Imperfecti. Members of this group may be assigned to their proper place in the classification system when more information becomes available.

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    Malassezia Species

    by Medical Links 12-16-2014 05:06 AM
  5. Glomeromycota

    Glomeromycota is one of six recognized phyla within the kingdom Fungi. It includes 150 described species most of which are entirely epigeous (underground) and form arbuscules in the roots of plants. They are dependent on energy obtained through a symbiotic relationship with plants known as an arbuscular mycorrhiza.

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  6. Lichens

    Lichens are fungi which form a symbiotic partnership with either green algae (Chlorophycophyta) or blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria). Most of the lichenised fungi are from the phylum Ascomycota but some are from the phylum Basidiomycota.

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  7. Neocallimastigomycota

    Phylum of anaerobic fungi, found mainly within the stomachs of ruminants.

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    Rumen Microbes

    by Medical Links 12-16-2014 05:06 AM
  8. Zygomycota

    The Zygomycota are a group of fungi, the pin moulds and others, with about 1000 species. They can be identified by the fact that their hyphae are not divided by septa and that their spores are produced inside sporangia, which are held aloft on special hyphae called sporangiophores. There are two classes, the smaller, Trichomycetes, being parasites or commensals inside the guts of living arthropods. The larger class, Zygomycetes, with about 900 species, are moulds, with many being parasites of nematodes, protists and insects. Many zygomycotes are mycorrhizal and form symbiotic relationships with plants, where branches of the hyphae form intricate structures within the root cells of the host.

    Entomophthoraceae
    Mucoraceae
    Phycomycetaceae

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    • Links: 17
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    Entomophthora muscae

    by Medical Links 12-16-2014 05:06 AM



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