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    diferrentiation bt Hyperthermia & hypokalemia

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    pt after physical activity extremly sweating & having muscle cramps is this Hyperthermia or Hypokalemia wat's the difference?

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    Re: diferrentiation bt Hyperthermia & hypokalemia

    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous
    pt after physical activity extremly sweating & having muscle cramps is this Hyperthermia or Hypokalemia wat's the difference?
    '

    You can have both hypokalemia and hyperthemia. Hypokalemia is low potassium and hyperthermia is extreme heat.

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    I meant malignant Hyperthermia because I think it includes lack of perspiration which is not the case here

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    grandpadoc

    HEAT EXHAUSTION: An illness resulting from prolonged heavy activity in a hot environment with subsequent dehydration, electrolyte depletion, and rectal temperature >37.8 C but <40 C.

    HEAT STROKE: A life-threatening heat illness characterized by extreme hyperthermia, dehydration, and neurologic manifestations (core temperature >40 C).

    ♦ SYNONYMS

    Heat illness

    Hyperthermia

    ICD-9CM CODES

    992.0 Heat stroke

    992.5 Heat exhaustion

    ♦ EPIDEMIOLOGY & DEMOGRAPHICS

    Heat exhaustion and stroke occur more frequently in elderly patients, especially those taking diuretics or medications that impair heat dissipation (e.g., phenothiazines, anticholinergics, antihistamines, β-blockers).

    Incidence of heat stroke in United States is approximately 20 cases/100,000 population.

    ♦ PHYSICAL FINDINGS & CLINICAL PRESENTATION

    HEAT EXHAUSTION:

    Generalized malaise, weakness, headache, muscle and abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, hypotension, and tachycardia
    Rectal temperature is usually normal
    Sweating is usually present

    HEAT STROKE:

    Neurologic manifestations (seizures, tremor, hemiplegia, coma, psychosis, and other bizarre behavior)
    Evidence of dehydration (poor skin turgor, sunken eyeballs)
    Tachycardia, hyperventilation
    Skin is hot, red, and flushed
    Sweating is often (not always) absent, particularly in elderly patients

    ♦ ETIOLOGY

    Exogenous heat gain (increased ambient temperature)
    Increased heat production (exercise, infection, hyperthyroidism, drugs)
    Impaired heat dissipation (high humidity, heavy clothing, neonatal or elderly patients, drugs [phenothiazines, anticholinergics, antihistamines, butyrophenones, amphetamines, cocaine, alcohol, β-blockers])

    ♦ DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

    Infections (meningitis, encephalitis, sepsis)
    Head trauma
    Epilepsy
    Thyroid storm
    Acute cocaine intoxication
    Malignant hyperthermia
    Heat exhaustion can be differentiated from heat stroke by the following:
    Essentially intact mental function and lack of significant fever in heat exhaustion
    Mild or absent increases in CPK, AST, LDH, ALT in heat exhaustion

    ♦ WORKUP

    Heat stroke: comprehensive history, physical examination, and laboratory evaluation
    Heat exhaustion: in most cases, laboratory tests are not necessary for diagnosis

    ♦ LABORATORY TESTS

    Laboratory abnormalities may include the following:

    Elevated BUN, creatinine, Hct
    Hyponatremia or hypernatremia, hyperkalemia or hypokalemia
    Elevated LDH, AST, ALT, CPK, bilirubin
    Lactic acidosis, respiratory alkalosis (secondary to hyperventilation)
    Myoglobinuria, hypofibrinogenemia, fibrinolysis, hypocalcemia
    Dr G A Joachim Brisson

    Life is a gift. What you make of your life is your gift in return.

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    Asclepius1's Avatar
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    hi guest i saw u in in some other discussion forms plzzzzzz tell me the websites u visit

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    usmle attempts

    does number of attempts to pass the steps count aginst you during admission to residency??Please help me

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