Sponsored Links
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: j-1 or h-1

  1. #1
    docarun is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    j-1 or h-1

    Advertisements



    does aiming for an H-1 visa greatly limit your options for residency and fellowships? so is it better to go for a j-1 visa and then apply for a waiver job?

  2. #2
    alpathmd is offline Moderator 510 points
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Home of the Tigers...
    Posts
    839
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    both

    Either way, it's difficult. Some programs sponsor H1's some dont'. You are best to apply to both types of programs and see how the interviews go and if you get pre-matches.

    In the end, the H1s are optimal to avoid the 2 yr return to home commitment. The J1 is asking for hardship (looking for a waiver, moving to an underserved area).

    Good luck,

    A.

  3. #3
    alpathmd is offline Moderator 510 points
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Home of the Tigers...
    Posts
    839
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    lists

    Sometimes these lists can be "outdated" as hospitals change their policies each year. Your best bet would be to find the hospitals you are interested in, and call yourself. It takes work, but at least you'll hear it from the program yourself

    A.

  4. #4
    TKS
    TKS is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    9
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: both

    Quote Originally Posted by almd2b
    In the end, the H1s are optimal to avoid the 2 yr return to home commitment. The J1 is asking for hardship (looking for a waiver, moving to an underserved area).

    Good luck,

    A.
    Hi, could someone give more elaboration about 2 yrs return to home commitment for J1 visa ?. Does it mean the visa holder must return back to his/her home country for 2 years (before he can come back to US) or he/she has to return home after 2 years in US ?.

  5. #5
    studentMD is offline Elite Member 512 points
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    3,345
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Images
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    ...

    the 2 yr return home means... that after u finish ur residency.. u have to return home for 2 yr period of time.. (unless u get a j1 waiver job)

  6. #6
    B:-) is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    84
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    more about 2-year home residence rule

    Also, you literally have to go to your home country. If you go to a third country, it doesn't count. Not even if you were doing something beneficial- e.g. volunteering in developing country. Obligation to go home cannot be (in case of medical residency) cancelled by the waiver from your home country- e.g. even if they claim that they don't need you, you still have to go there. Even if you marry U.S. citizen, you are still obligated to go home, unless you prove that your family would suffer an exceptional hardship if you moved home. From what I heard, it's not easy to prove. It's not enough to say that you wouldn't be making enough money or your spouse doesn't speak the language (well if you're at home with babies and he's the only one that can work but doesn't speak the language or he has a business that he's commited to in the USA, then maybe. But you have to prove it) Examples of hardship would be
    country in a conflict
    war torn country
    thread of ethnic, racial, political or religious persecuation in home country
    and so on.
    One common way how to stay in the USA is to seek a J-1 waiver, which is not easy but definitely not impossible either. You either need to find a job in underserved area and commit to stay there for 3 years (I heard it's going to change to 5 years if it already hasn't been changed) or you prove that you have extraordinary abilities or you're professionally so good that your stay is in national iterest. The majority manage to stay through finding a waiver job in underserved area.

  7. #7
    Kirst is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    599
    Downloads
    5
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    hrm...

    would you please consider the following scenario?

    1. canadian citizen
    2. caribbean medical graduate
    3. passed USMLE 1, 2 CK/CS
    4. passed MCCEE
    5. obtained J1
    6. finished 3 year US residency in internal medicine
    7. passed USMLE 3, US licensed and board certified

    at this point, what happens if:

    1. you want to do a fellowship in US? can you "extend" your J1 to continue your subspecialty training in US?
    2. you want to do a fellowship in canada? can you "fulfill" your return-home-for-2-year policy with a subspecialty training in canada?
    3. you went into the 1 year repatrition program in ontario to qualify for practice as an internist in canada? would this count towards the 2 year return home policy?
    4. can't you simply pass the canadian specialty board exam, get MCCQE 1/2 exemption, find a job in canada and just work off your 2 year policy?

    in general... does this 2 year return home policy entail 2 years of actual practice of medicine in canada or do they not care if one just spent 2 years playing on his/her playstation?

    on another note, i'm a little confused by the responses that i received from some program directors about J1. some say they sponsor J1 visa, but some say ECFMG is the official sponsor of J1 for IMGs. would anyone shed any light on what the difference is? if anyone can be sponsored for J1 visa through ECFMG, why would anyone bother hassling the propective programs with visa hurdles that would obviously work as a flaw on their application?
    Last edited by Kirst; 01-13-2006 at 09:33 AM.

  8. #8
    BabaOriley's Avatar
    BabaOriley is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,026
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    good questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirst
    would you please consider the following scenario?

    1. canadian citizen
    2. caribbean medical graduate
    3. passed USMLE 1, 2 CK/CS
    4. passed MCCEE
    5. obtained J1
    6. finished 3 year US residency in internal medicine
    7. passed USMLE 3, US licensed and board certified

    at this point, what happens if:

    1. you want to do a fellowship in US? can you "extend" your J1 to continue your subspecialty training in US?
    2. you want to do a fellowship in canada? can you "fulfill" your return-home-for-2-year policy with a subspecialty training in canada?
    3. you went into the 1 year repatrition program in ontario to qualify for practice as an internist in canada? would this count towards the 2 year return home policy?
    4. can't you simply pass the canadian specialty board exam, get MCCQE 1/2 exemption, find a job in canada and just work off your 2 year policy?

    in general... does this 2 year return home policy entail 2 years of actual practice of medicine in canada or do they not care if one just spent 2 years playing on his/her playstation?

    on another note, i'm a little confused by the responses that i received from some program directors about J1. some say they sponsor J1 visa, but some say ECFMG is the official sponsor of J1 for IMGs. would anyone shed any light on what the difference is? if anyone can be sponsored for J1 visa through ECFMG, why would anyone bother hassling the propective programs with visa hurdles that would obviously work as a flaw on their application?
    Good questions...hopefully someone will answer them.

    With regards to them not caring if you just play playstation 2 for 2 years, I think thats correct. Many do research, or work in a community based hospital in some capacity, but not necessarily as a doctor. I'm not sure about the rest of the questions.

  9. #9
    scoobz1981 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    450
    Downloads
    6
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    1. You can extend J1 upto 7 years of total US training.
    4. Yes. I believe you can pass the specialty board exam and get the a job for 2 years.
    As for 2, and 3, I dont know the answers there!

    Val

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •