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  1. #1
    rKrause is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Texas Chiropractic College??

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    Hello all,
    I am interested in earning my doctorate of chiropractic and opening up my own practice one day. I am against the "straight" schools and many (not all) of their graduates who are holding back the chiropractic profession with their ignorant and outdated "subluxation" theory. There are two chiropractic colleges in Texas: Parker "University" (thanks Ag) and Texas Chiropractic College. I have heard that Parker is predominately a "straight" school, but have not heard much about TCC. I was wondering if anyone has had any experience/opinions with TCC, and whether or not it is considered a "straight" school?
    Thanks
    -rKrause

  2. #2
    khiro is offline Member 512 points
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    Tcc

    let me start with saying that i am a 1985 grad of TCC, so i do not have any significant knowledge of how the school is conducted today. i will follow that by saying that TCC is not a straight school. it is ready to move chiropractic much farther than 1885. it is a much smaller school than parker, although when i started TCC parker was just getting started; and with much smaller class sizes than what i had in 1982-85. you should get a good chiro ed from TCC. in the old days the vast majority of DCs in the panhandle part of florida came from two schools, national or texas. no kooks, and it made it easy to refer with trust between us whenever that was needed. today if for example i have a college age pt that leaves to go to school i only recommend national or tcc DCs to continue my treatment plan. i don't know of any WS grads, but it is a very good school as well, and i would trust their grads not to be kooky. TCC as well as national and western states did not overtly oppose the CCE changes like the straight schools. ok, so i think i have answered your question and added some info for the fun of it.

    btw, while i still believe that the chiro profession has a troubling past and the future is a difficult road to make a living in and i generally don't recommend it, i can say that i am not ashamed of my TCC education. it has served me well. good luck with your decision.

    khiro




    Quote Originally Posted by rKrause View Post
    Hello all,
    I am interested in earning my doctorate of chiropractic and opening up my own practice one day. I am against the "straight" schools and many (not all) of their graduates who are holding back the chiropractic profession with their ignorant and outdated "subluxation" theory. There are two chiropractic colleges in Texas: Parker "University" (thanks Ag) and Texas Chiropractic College. I have heard that Parker is predominately a "straight" school, but have not heard much about TCC. I was wondering if anyone has had any experience/opinions with TCC, and whether or not it is considered a "straight" school?
    Thanks
    -rKrause

  3. #3
    tjolie is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Hi Krause, I am currently a trimester 7 student at TCC. We are most definitely NOT a "straight" school. We actually pride ourselves on being very science/research based. We are probably one the smallest chiropractic schools around; the class that started this summer has 18 new students, which is a little less than the average class but close. From my experience this has benefited the students. It allows each professor to know his/her students, and it allows the students to get one-on-one help when needed. There have been recent curriculum changes made that provide clinical skills to students much sooner in their education now. They are still in the process of making a few changes, and I believe the majority of them are for the better. TCC also has a hospital rotation program that allows students who complete clinical requirements early, to go shadow orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, etc. to give them great exposure to other fields that they will closely work with. After my experience here, I would most definitely recommend TCC to anyone interested in becoming a Doctor of Chiropractic. Go to http : // www . txchiro . edu / admissions/ speak_with_a_student.aspx (remove the spaces it wouldn't let me post a link.) if you would like to speak more with me or another student.

  4. #4
    TXchiro_ambassador is offline Newbie 510 points
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    rKrause,

    I am a current student at TCC and am about to finish my 2nd year on campus. I think the quality of the professors on campus is one of the best things about the school. Since I have been on campus, I have noticed that the administration has made an attempt to bring in professors that are not only great educators, but also professors that are into doing research for the profession. Everything that khiro said about the smaller class sizes still holds true so you get a lot of personal attention from each professor. Most of what is taught in the classroom is going to be scientifically based and should have some research to back it up. There are a few classes that you have to take that talk about "subluxation", but those are more directed at teaching about the history of chiropractic. I would recommend you come to campus and check it out for yourself. There are campus visit days nearly every Friday (if not all Fridays). On your visit you could speak with professors, administration, and other students that would be happy to give you their perspective on the school.

    Good luck on making your decision.

    Hope to see you on campus.

    Txchiro_ambassador

  5. #5
    AgActual's Avatar
    AgActual is offline Member 525 points
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    I agree with everyone else, so far, TCC is where you want to go. Parker is one of the straightest schools in the country. TCC is one of the schools rapidly moving towards chiropractic as a primary care for the skeletal system and away from the old model of chiropractic. Places like TCC are where the future of chiropractic is going to come from. Schools like Parker is where you should go if you want to join the dying wing of chiropractic.

    Quote Originally Posted by rKrause View Post
    Hello all,
    I am interested in earning my doctorate of chiropractic and opening up my own practice one day. I am against the "straight" schools and many (not all) of their graduates who are holding back the chiropractic profession with their ignorant and outdated "subluxation" theory. There are two chiropractic colleges in Texas: Parker "University" (thanks Ag) and Texas Chiropractic College. I have heard that Parker is predominately a "straight" school, but have not heard much about TCC. I was wondering if anyone has had any experience/opinions with TCC, and whether or not it is considered a "straight" school?
    Thanks
    -rKrause

  6. #6
    thebonecrusher10 is offline Junior Member 516 points
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    I'd like to add my 2 cents to this as well.

    As someone who went to a "straight school" and graduated just last year, I have to disagree.

    I'm a 2010 graduate of Palmer in Davenport and am very much a honest, evidence based, patient centered practitioner. In fact, there are several of us from that school who feel this way. There are also people who I graduated with who are very straight chiropractors. However, most are mixers and are very much evidence based. In fact, evidenced based chiropractic is taught in the curriculum (a core course).

    With the above said, our profession is too complex and our views too varied to throw all graduates from one college in the same boat. The main reason I chose Palmer wasn't because I agreed with their propaganda, it was because it was affordable and geographically close. The rest, well I can think for myself.

    You can either go to a school that agrees with your ideals, which isn't a bad idea by any means. Or you can go to a school that doesn't and fight to shake up the system, which I did while I was at Palmer. It boils down to whether you're a leader or a follower

    Regardless, however you feel about chiropractic, be outspoken about it and if you want change, FIGHT FOR IT. DO NOT be one of these people who waits for change to happen, make it happen!

  7. #7
    Forsaken38 is offline Junior Member 513 points
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    Well said!

    Quote Originally Posted by thebonecrusher10 View Post
    I'd like to add my 2 cents to this as well.

    As someone who went to a "straight school" and graduated just last year, I have to disagree.

    I'm a 2010 graduate of Palmer in Davenport and am very much a honest, evidence based, patient centered practitioner. In fact, there are several of us from that school who feel this way. There are also people who I graduated with who are very straight chiropractors. However, most are mixers and are very much evidence based. In fact, evidenced based chiropractic is taught in the curriculum (a core course).

    With the above said, our profession is too complex and our views too varied to throw all graduates from one college in the same boat. The main reason I chose Palmer wasn't because I agreed with their propaganda, it was because it was affordable and geographically close. The rest, well I can think for myself.

    You can either go to a school that agrees with your ideals, which isn't a bad idea by any means. Or you can go to a school that doesn't and fight to shake up the system, which I did while I was at Palmer. It boils down to whether you're a leader or a follower

    Regardless, however you feel about chiropractic, be outspoken about it and if you want change, FIGHT FOR IT. DO NOT be one of these people who waits for change to happen, make it happen!

  8. #8
    AgActual's Avatar
    AgActual is offline Member 525 points
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    With the above said, our profession is too complex and our views too varied to throw all graduates from one college in the same boat. The main reason I chose Palmer wasn't because I agreed with their propaganda, it was because it was affordable and geographically close. The rest, well I can think for myself.
    Well I would have to disagree. It was my experience that many students going into chiropractic weren't quite sure what this field was about. I researched the field thoroughly before decided to go to National, I was already in grad school and wanted to make sure I knew what this field was about, but it seems that very few of my classmates did the same. Almost none knew of this concept of the vertebral subluxation before taking our history course first semester. Very few knew that chiropractors learned other treatment techniques besides "back cracking". It seemed most expected that they were going to learn some quick manipulation techniques, take some very basic courses in biochemistry and neuroanatomy, and get out with little fuss.

    What is my point? Well, most of my classmates knew nothing about chiropractic and knew nothing about the college when entering school. I think they would have believed anything they were told. I don't personally know anyone at National that believes in subluxations but i bet, most of the students here would be die hard defenders of the concept if they went to a place like Life or Sherman. They aren't dumb and they won't be incompetent doctors. They were just ignorant and eager to learn whatever they were taught, and to be honest, a subluxation sounds pretty logical if you know little about anatomy, which was the case for most of us.

    From my prospective, it does matter where you go to school. Of course some chiros can come out of the straighter schools (although Paker is straighter than Palmer) and be well grounded, talented physicians, as you and your new group have proved it; just seems the odds of that happening are much lower that if you go to one of the "reformed" schools.

    So yes, you could go to a place like Parker and be a good doctor. But why risk it, especially if you have a choice to go to a school that is a much better fit for your philosophy?
    Last edited by AgActual; 05-31-2011 at 09:25 PM.

  9. #9
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    hopefuldoc74 is offline Member 539 points
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    Quote Originally Posted by rKrause View Post
    Hello all,
    I am interested in earning my doctorate of chiropractic and opening up my own practice one day. I am against the "straight" schools and many (not all) of their graduates who are holding back the chiropractic profession with their ignorant and outdated "subluxation" theory. There are two chiropractic colleges in Texas: Parker "University" (thanks Ag) and Texas Chiropractic College. I have heard that Parker is predominately a "straight" school, but have not heard much about TCC. I was wondering if anyone has had any experience/opinions with TCC, and whether or not it is considered a "straight" school?
    Thanks
    -rKrause
    Can I ask why you are looking at a DC program over other healthcare programs?

    Though it cost all you have, get understanding.

    SJSM - MD1 ( Hidden Content ) MD2 ( ) MD3 ( ) MD4 ( )

  10. #10
    Forsaken38 is offline Junior Member 513 points
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    While this may be true for most people, there are some of us who are outliers. But like AgActual said, and Im paraphrasing, Why mess with statistics? Most graduates from schools like parker, life, sherman, etc. are going to be subluxation docs, with a heavy dose of philosophy, preaching from their little green books. IMO, when you get that far into philosophy, you approach the boundary of cultism. Most of those guys are so caught up in what they believe to be true that they will never see things objectively. Some of these ultra straights internalize philosophy to the point that it becomes part of them. So stay away from the straight schools unless you are interested in making waves while there.

    Quote Originally Posted by AgActual View Post
    From my prospective, it does matter where you go to school. Of course some chiros can come out of the straighter schools (although Paker is straighter than Palmer) and be well grounded, talented physicians, as you and your new group have proved it; just seems the odds of that happening are much lower that if you go to one of the "reformed" schools.

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