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  1. #1
    AgActual's Avatar
    AgActual is offline Member 525 points
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    State Population to Chiropractor Ratios

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    The thread that Khiro has been anticipating. These numbers show the ratio of a state population to the number of practicing chiropractors. It isn't the whole story on where it is best to practice a chiropractor but it is a start. The states listed towards the top would have the best ratios, the states at the bottom are the worst. The overall ratio in for the U.S. is about 7000 people for every chiropractor, so that is a good benchmark. And since about 10% of the population go to chiropractors, divide the numbers by 10 to see the share of the population that each chiropractor in that state should theoretically get.

    The states are in the next post, since the forum says the post was going to be too long
    Last edited by AgActual; 01-19-2011 at 12:11 AM.

  2. #2
    AgActual's Avatar
    AgActual is offline Member 525 points
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    Washington DC=20,000

    Mississippi =14,475

    Maryland=12,830

    Delaware=10,044

    Louisiana=10,002

    Indiana=9,236

    Virginia=9,196

    West Virginia =8,823

    Alabama=8,318

    Tennessee =8,113

    Texas=7,737

    North Carolina=7,652

    South Carolina =7,582

    Wyoming =7,225

    Kentucky=7,055

    Ohio=6,774

    Arkansas=6,700

    Rhode Island =6,623

    Hawaii=6,355

    Oklahoma =6,315

    New Mexico=6,239

    Wisconsin=6,039

    Georgia=5,864

    Utah=5,629

    Nevada=5,568

    New Hampshire =5,424

    Maine=5,400

    Massachusetts=5,380

    New York=5,342

    Florida=5,208

    Michigan=5,147

    Nebraska=5,057

    Illinois=4,814

    Washington State=4,735

    Montana=4,687

    Connecticut=4,551

    Kansas=4,550

    Pennsylvania=4,301

    Arizona=4,268

    Missouri=4,201

    Alaska=4,142

    Vermont=4,011

    California=3,854

    Colorado=3,831

    Idaho=3,797

    New Jersey=3,747

    Oregon=3,687

    South Dakota =3,378

    North Dakota=3,070

    Minnesota=2,907

    Iowa=2,764
    Last edited by AgActual; 01-19-2011 at 12:12 AM.

  3. #3
    khiro is offline Member 512 points
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    thank you AgActual

    this is a great start for those in DC school. NEXT, you would want to consider how you want your practice to be paid. good mix of pay? then you need to look at economics for the areas of your desired state. for me right now in fla, state of florida employees have good, reasonable chiropractic coverage, so near the highest population of SOF employees would make sense, tallahassee?? anyway, you get the drift of what i am saying. please understand that i really feel that this is so much more important than passing boards or getting a license. this comes first, and if you can't find a good spot, then go ahead and throw some mud on the wall and see if it sticks. location is so much more important today than when i started. gosh, back then it hardly mattered at all. all you needed to do was show up and care for your pts.

    thank you and good luck to you as you proceed with your ed.

  4. #4
    AgActual's Avatar
    AgActual is offline Member 525 points
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    I think you also need to look at how liberal the state's chiropractic laws are. If you look at Oregon on this list, you would think it is a terrible state to practice in. However, chiropractors in Oregon have an extremely wide scope of practice and chiropractic is fairly popular with the general public, which probably overrides the poor population ratio. I think if you combined this list with the utilization of chiropractic in each state and laws governing chiropractic in each state, you could probably pin down the best places to practice.

    Here is information about the scope of practice in each state from about 10 years ago. I could probably slowly go through each state's more recent laws and post a scope of practice summery in a few weeks.

    International Chiropractors Association

    Quote Originally Posted by khiro View Post
    this is a great start for those in DC school. NEXT, you would want to consider how you want your practice to be paid. good mix of pay? then you need to look at economics for the areas of your desired state. for me right now in fla, state of florida employees have good, reasonable chiropractic coverage, so near the highest population of SOF employees would make sense, tallahassee?? anyway, you get the drift of what i am saying. please understand that i really feel that this is so much more important than passing boards or getting a license. this comes first, and if you can't find a good spot, then go ahead and throw some mud on the wall and see if it sticks. location is so much more important today than when i started. gosh, back then it hardly mattered at all. all you needed to do was show up and care for your pts.

    thank you and good luck to you as you proceed with your ed.
    Last edited by AgActual; 01-19-2011 at 02:51 PM.

  5. #5
    khiro is offline Member 512 points
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    you're thinking in the right direction

    good job. you're light yrs ahead of most DC students.

    another thing is to try and figure out how easy would it be for your potential pts to pay you. avoid areas of low employment, high foreclosure, low insurance coverage (sounds like the whole US). unlike the MD/DO as a chiro you will not work for the gov't. so that area of potential reimbursement is a no-go for chiros. wait; what do you mean saying that the typical md/do works for the govt?? that can't be b/c they have their own office and even suzi the receptionist. go sit in most md/do office and look at how the pt pays their bill. medicare, medicaid (govt) is a significant part of most offices and a bigger part of some specialists. you won't have that financial base as a chiro. you can also cancel out govt $$ in tricare, champus. also fed govt workers' comp. of course if you are in fla you can cancel out state workers comp as well. and they (STATEFARM) tried several yrs ago to get rid of chiros in the auto injury care but somehow they didnt get it through. they are no different than any other industry, if you can't get money into the company make sure that what you did get, doesn't leave.

    your pts have to be able to pay you; and i am not talking 20 bucks a visit either.

  6. #6
    AgActual's Avatar
    AgActual is offline Member 525 points
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    One of my business professors recently talked about this issue. He said you want the town you are practicing in to have a ratio of about 1 DC per 2500 people. In most areas, you would be looking at an area of about 5 miles around your clinic. So if there are 10000 people with in 5 miles of where you want to practice, there shouldn't be more than 4 chiros with in a 5 mile radius.

    Of course all of the states are above that number, overall, but many towns and cities with in the state may not be that good.

    Finally, the guy said that some states on that list utilize chiropractic far more than the national average of about 8%. So the seemingly poor ratios in Iowa and Oregon are much better than Washington DC, since everyone in Iowa sees the chiropractor but very few people in Washington do.

  7. #7
    thebonecrusher10 is offline Junior Member 516 points
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    Imagine armed with this information, along with a little broader scope. Geez.

  8. #8
    stallbauk is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Where was this information on ratios found? Thanks!

  9. #9
    Davidsmith009 is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Check this information about chiropractor in USA. I hope it is helpful.

    www[dot]wellness[dot]com/find/chiropractor

  10. #10
    Davidsmith009 is offline Newbie 510 points
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    Check this information about chiropractor in USA. I hope it is helpful.

    www[dot]wellness[dot]com/find/chiropractor

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