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  1. #1
    anoncan is offline Junior Member
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    J-1 info for Canadians

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    Here is the info I have written about the J-1 visa

    Hope it helps, best of luck




    J-1 VISA

    I have read the requirements for this J-1 visa that are posted at:



    http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hppb/healthca...hip/index.html



    Here is my executive summary:



    From 1993-2001, trying to get the J-1 visa as a Canadian was really hard, sometimes even impossible. So it was quite discouraging. But things have changed. As of 2002, Health Canada has changed the policies a tad and it is now a little more open to get this visa.



    Here are the steps. Basically, to get this visa you need:



    1) an offer from a U.S. residency program saying that they have accepted you

    2) your ECFMG certificate (of course)

    3) to write and pass the MCCEE (write this in your fourth year of med school)

    4) a letter from the Royal College of Canada stating that the residency you are doing in the U.S. is acceptable to Canadian standards

    5) a "Statement of Need" letter from the Canadian Health Ministry



    Huh? "Statement of Need" you ask? what is that? Well remember what the J-1 visa is. . .it is an EXCHANGE visa. Which means that after you finish your residency in the U.S. you must return to our home country (Canada) for a minimum of two years. So Canada has to tell the U.S. that they actually have a 'need' for you once you return. Pretty basic thing.



    Anyhow, how does one get a "Statement of Need" letter? You need to write and pass a test: MCCEE, info about this test is at: www.mcc.ca , and then apply for the statement of need letter with Health Canada:



    ****************************

    Program Administrator (Statement of Need) Health Canada

    Jeanne Mance Building Address Locator *****

    Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1B4



    read: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hppb/healthca...hip/index.html



    You will apply for the J-1 visa with the ECFMG (not the INS), read:



    www.ecfmg.org/evsp/index.html



    Now, if you DO NOT want to return to Canada for that ‘‘two year’’ requirement, then you CAN stay in the U.S. if you agree to go and work as a physician in a rural/underserviced area in the U.S. for three years. But unfortunately the J-1 waiver is not that easy to get, especially if your home country is a first-world country. Also if you do get a waiver you can’t choose where you go, the INS places you somewhere. . .so say hello to Granite Peak, Montana or Kearney, Nebraska.



    In my personal opinion (not worth much these days it seems) this visa should be called the N-1 visa. ‘N’ for nightmare. Because as a Canadian, it means that you will most likely lose two years. Why? Because after you complete residency in the U.S. you must go back to Canada for two years. And when you return to Canada for that two years you cannot practice medicine.

    Why? Because Canada does not accept the USMLE, Canada does not accept the ECFMG certificate. To work in Canada as a doctor you would have to do the entire Canadian certification process all over again. That's right, you would have to write MCCEE, MCCQE Part 1, MCCQE Part 2, and the board exams for the residency that you did in the United States.

    Also you may have to do extra year(s) of residency training in Canada, for example if you did an Internal Medicine residency in U.S. you would have to do one more year of residency in Canada.

    You might be thinking “yeah, but there is a doctor shortage in Canada, so I will be able to get a job”. Well this is not correct. Yes there is a doctor shortage in Canada, but the way Canada is solving it is by increasing the number of spots at Canadian medical schools and by opening up a new medical school in Northern Ontario which will produce 56 MD’s a year. Canada will certainly not offer jobs to Foreign Medical Graduates. ***** Hawkins of the Association of Canadian Medical Colleges emailed me this response recently:



    "Applicants should be aware that enrolling in dubious, proprietary, for-profit medical schools opened specifically to cater to rejected applicants to medical schools in Canada or the USA is highly unlikely to be a path to practising medicine in Canada."



    Now after you finish this two year ‘return to Canada’ requirement, at this time you are free to go back to the U.S. to work as a doctor. Now what visa will you need to get at this point, to work in the U.S. you may ask? The answer is surprising simple à H-1B. Makes you wonder why you didn’t get it in the first place, doesn’t it?



    I think you all should read the excellent summary, written by a Canadian (Val Ilivitsky) who graduated from Carleton University in Ottawa and then went to the Caribbean for med school (St. George) and he is now in PA, USA doing residency in Anesthesiology. Here is his link: http://www.csa-notes.com/rescan.htm
    *personal info removed by request

  2. #2
    CanIMG is offline Moderator
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    Re: [b]J-1 and H-1B Visa info for Canadians[/b]

    I find it extremely unlikely that the physician shortage in Canada will be solved by simply increasing enrollment in a few universities. We're dealing with a much bigger problem...in fact, getting a job in Canada is doable for the graduate of a US residency program because of the undersupply of doctors, so long as you fulfill certain requirements. To become licensed in Ontario, for example, there are five steps:

    1.) Immigration Status: Canadian citizenship or permanent resident status

    2.) Education: a Medical Degree from an approved medical school

    3.) Qualifying Exams: successful completion of written examinations set and administered by the Medical Council of Canada

    4.) Specialist Certification: The national College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) assesses family practitioners and the national Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (Royal College) assesses all other specialists.

    5.) Supervised or observed practice: At least one year of postgraduate medical training or active medical practice in Canada.

    In regards to point 3, it would be in the interests of the prospective graduate to write these exams at the same time that they write the corresponding USMLE exam. This way you get them out of the way while the info's still fresh in your mind.

    For number 4, this is entirely doable since an approved US residency qualifies the applicant to write the CFPC or RCPSC exam.

    As for 5, this is really the hardest part since Ontario is one of the strictest in this regard. Fortunately, other provinces are not as tight and you will be able to get your required year of active medical practice in another province. After the year, you may apply for registration in Ontario.

    Check the Ontario College website for this info
    http://www.cpso.on.ca/Info_physicians/regmem.htm
    CanIMG
    Moderator - Canadian IMG and Immigration Visa Forums

  3. #3
    anoncan is offline Junior Member
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    Re: [b]J-1 and H-1B Visa info for Canadians[/b]

    <html>
    <head>
    <title>Open Letter to Canadians</title>
    </head>
    <BODY BGCOLOR="blue">
    <P ALIGN=CENTER><TABLE WIDTH="685" BORDER="0" CELLSPACING="0"
    CELLPADDING="30">
    <TR>
    <TD WIDTH="100%" BGCOLOR="#ffffff">

    <body text="#000000" link="#0000ff" vlink="#551a8b" alink="#ff0000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    <p align="center"><strong>The Future of Our Medical Careers</strong>
    <p align="center"><strong>An Open Letter to Canadian Students at Saba University School of Medicine</strong>
    <p align="center">**** ****
    <p align="center">Revised March 2003
    <br wp="br1"><br wp="br2">
    <br wp="br1"><br wp="br2">
    <p>
    "For Canada to permit regulations to stand, which have as their
    sole foundation appeals to discrimination toward Canadian citizens
    who are graduates of foreign medical schools, is to commit, a
    violation of the <a href="http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C-12.3">Bill of Rights</a>, as heinous as the original
    set of injustices and inequalities, for which this Bill of Rights Act
    was created in 1960"

    <br wp="br1"><br wp="br2">
    <br wp="br1"><br wp="br2">
    &lt;p> Thank you for taking the time to read this. First off, let me start by addressing some of the <u>most common
    comments</u> I have heard among Canadian students here at Saba University School of Medicine:
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>A) "I am going to do all my clinical rotations in Canada"&lt;/strong>
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>I have contacted the Canadian Medical Association:
    &lt;br>www.cma.ca, 1-800-663-7336, extension 2307
    &lt;p>I spoke with them on the phone, and they told me that an IMG (International Medical Student/Graduate) (which is what
    we are) CANNOT do core rotations in Canada. Regardless of wether you are a Canadian citizen or not.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>You can only do electives, visit this site for info on this:
    &lt;p>Electives in Canada for FMG's: http://aix1.uottawa.ca/~medundgr/meds99
    &lt;p>
    In addition, the Association of Canadian Medical Colleges has ruled that the maximum length of time out-of-country medical students may be accepted for training in Canada is 12 weeks (www.acmc.ca, ***** Hawkins: [email protected]).
    &lt;p>Now, some Canadian's here at Saba have the idea that they will do their electives, and have Saba University count
    them as cores. For example, you go to Ontario (or somewhere else in Canada) and do, let's say, an elective in surgery,
    then Saba University accepts it for the Core surgery requirement. See what I mean? Well, this is a big mistake. Let me tell you why:

    &lt;p>When you finish medical school, and residency and apply for a license in Canada, the Canadian medical governing bodies will
    evaluate (in great detail) every clinical you have done. And if all your clinicals were essentially just "electives", and you broke the rules by doing more than 12 weeks of electives in Canada as a foreign student, do you
    think one of the strictest countries in the world is going to grant you a license to practice medicine?? . . .I'll let you
    ponder this.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>B) "I going to transfer to a Canadian Medical School"&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>None of the sixteen Canadian medical schools accepts transfer students from outside Canada. In fact most, wont even
    look at an application from WITHIN Canada.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>C) "I am going to get a residency in Canada"&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>It is my belief that for an IMG, getting a residency in Canada with the CaRMS match is about as hard as making it to the
    NBA, and believe me I am very, very far from being the Michael Jordan of medical school.

    &lt;p>Just visit www.carms.ca and see how few IMG's get a residency in Canadian match every year.
    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario reports that there are currently over 1500 Foreign doctors in Ontario with no job
    and no residency.&lt;p>
    Then you have all this hoopla here at Saba about being able to get a residency in Canada "outside the match". Where?!?
    How?!? Don't just hear that and think that your set, you must have facts!! The only ones that will be able to take advantage of this are those with
    some serious 'inside' connections. Their rumors, and hearsay are bogus, and we all know it. <u>I definitely won't plan
    out my medical career based on the "doors will open up" theory.</u> Because quite frankly in Canada they never will, definitely not
    for graduates of foreign medical schools.
    &lt;p>
    Across Canada there are thousands and thousands of desperate foreign trained doctors. Some of them are outright Canadian Citizens!
    Of those several thousand only about 400-500 are able to pass the Canadian board exams that make
    them eligible to apply for a residency in Canada.
    &lt;p>
    Of those 400-500 that fullfill all these
    requirements needed just to apply, only 10% will obtain a residency position (it has varied
    between 4% and 16% over the past 8 years). Also, those residency positions are the left over
    ones, that NO Canadian medical graduate wanted.
    &lt;p>
    Verification: www.carms.ca/stats/stats_index.htm



    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>D) "I am not going to write the USMLE, because I am going to Canada, so I won't need it"&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>If you don't write the USMLE, your life and career will turn into such a big joke, that even the best comedians in
    Hollywood will have difficulty portraying it . . . that's all I'm going to say about this.


    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>E) "I am going to come back to Canada, after doing a residency in the United States"&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>
    This won't happen. After you finish residency in the U.S. and return to Canada, you cannot practice medicine. Why?
    Because Canada does not accept the USMLE, Canada does not accept the ECFMG certificate. To work in Canada as a doctor you would
    have to do the entire Canadian certification process all over again. That's right, you would have to write MCCEE, MCCQE Part 1, MCCQE Part 2,
    and the Canadian board exams for the residency that you did in the United States.
    &lt;p>
    Also you may have to do extra year(s) of residency training in Canada, for example if you did an Internal Medicine residency
    in U.S. you would have to do one more year of residency in Canada.
    &lt;p>
    Also to go through that whole process to come back to Canada to make a lot less money makes no sense either.
    After you finish your residency in the U.S. you will be offered a job for $150,000 (that's U.S. dollars). &lt;br>

    You are trying to tell me, you will pass this up to go back to Penetanguishene, Ontario to
    work in some rural area for $110,000 Canadian dollars (which converts to only $69,000 U.S. dollars by the way).
    &lt;p>
    Verification: http://jobfutures.ca/fos/M521.shtml
    &lt;p>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">


    F) "I <u>absolutely will</u> go back to Canada to live, after doing a residency in the United States"
    &lt;p>
    O.k. since you persist with this, let's entertain this delusional comment.
    &lt;p>
    To obtain a residency in the U.S. you have to pass USMLE Step 1 and USMLE Step 2. Then during your U.S.
    residency you have to pass USMLE Step 3. Then to graduate from that program you have to pass the residency board exam. For example, if you
    are doing a residency in the U.S. in Family Practice, you have to pass the U.S. Family Practice board exam. Let's see, so far there are four board exams you need to pass.
    &lt;p>
    Now after you complete all this and go back to Canada, you must write all the Canadian board exams in order to obtain a license to practice medicine in Canada. Those tests are the:
    MCCEE, MCCQE Part 1, MCCQE Part 2, and the Canadian Family Practice board exam. That's another four board exams.
    &lt;p>
    I know people who could not even pass USMLE Step 1. It is impossible for me to believe that they will pass <u>eight</u> board exams. Whatever. . .
    &lt;p>
    Even if you did achieve this phenomenal and miraculous feat of academia, it would result in you ending up in some rural area like Northern Manitoba or the Yukon, earning half the
    salary that you could earn in the United States.
    &lt;p>
    For further info contact:
    &lt;p>
    Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada - http://rcpsc.medical.org &lt;br>
    College of Family Physicians of Canada - www.cfpc.ca
    &lt;p>
    The truth is that as soon as you get on that airplane and head toward a foreign medical school, you have pretty much cut Canada off forever. Therefore you'd better fully accept
    this certainty before going abroad for the M.D. degree.
    &lt;p>
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">

    &lt;p>&lt;strong>G) "I am going to write a letter, to have Canada eliminate the Evaluating Exam, because there is no need for it"&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>Canadian medical licencing authorities have the right and obligation to ensure Canadians get the best medical care in the
    world and it is my view this can be accomplished through generally accepted standardized tests such as the MCCEE that
    the RCPSC requires. Visit:

    &lt;p>RCPSC - Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada &lt;br>
    http://rcpsc.medical.org


    &lt;p>Contact the CPSO for more info:

    &lt;br>College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (www.cpso.on.ca)

    &lt;br>80 College Street

    &lt;br>Toronto, ON M5G 2E2 (416) 961-1711

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>Even the most massive letter campaign is NOT going to get them to change this requirement. I mean c'mon, that's like
    me saying "oh, I am going to write a letter to ECFMG, and ask them to eliminate the TOEFL requirement, because hey,
    I know my English, why do I need to write the TOEFL (www.toefl.org)?"

    &lt;p>Be realistic.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p> O.K. now let's look at some of the points, we as <u>Canadians need to be aware</u> of, and consider when we are
    planning out our medical career and future:

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>1) Take a look at the list of things you need to do to get back into Canada:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p> 1. successful completion of the MCCEE (evaluating exam)

    &lt;p> 2. successful completion of the Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE part 1)

    &lt;p> 3. proof of satisfactory completion of 12 months of postgraduate medical training

    &lt;p> 4. successful completion of the Qualifying Examination Part II (MCCQE part 2)

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>Information about the &lt;strong>Evaluating and Qualifying Examinations&lt;/strong> of the &lt;strong>Medical Council of Canada&lt;/strong> may be obtained
    from

    &lt;p>Medical Council of Canada, Box 8234, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, KlG 3H7, telephone: (613) 521-6012, fax: (613) 521-9417 www.mcc.ca

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">

    &lt;p>&lt;strong>2) One year of post graduate training requirement for IMG's.&lt;/strong>
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>As stated above, one the requirements for obtaining a residency, is one year of post graduate training.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p><u>MYTH</u>: There are 50 spots for residency in Ontario for IMG's. &lt;br>
    <u>FACT</u>: Those 50 spots are not for residency. They are for this one year of post-graduate training that is a prerequisite
    for applying for a residency position in Ontario through the Ontario International Medical Graduate Program.

    &lt;p>The OIMGP provides this pre-residency training to evaluate and to upgrade the qualifications of IMG's. Contact the OIMGP for details:

    &lt;p>Tel: (416) 978-2459, Fax (416) 978-8712

    &lt;br>Ontario IMG Program: www.library.utoronto.ca/medicine/oimg &lt;p>
    Related link:&lt;br>
    www.cou.on.ca/health/HOME/IMG/IMGHomePage.htm&lt;br>
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>Let's talk a little about this:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>
    Basically, after getting your M.D. from a foreign medical school you would have to:&lt;p>

    1) Go and live in Ontario for one year (absolute MUST requirement for everyone, I called and asked)&lt;br>
    2) Pass the MCCEE&lt;br>
    3) Pass the required English tests&lt;br>
    4) Apply to the Ontario IMG program (which is NOT residency by the way, it is just one year of pre-residency training.
    It is an UNPAID position. Actually you have to pay $2000 to be in this program)&lt;br>

    5) There are 450 applicants for 50 spots with the Ontario IMG program, so they narrow it down with two tests&lt;br>
    6) First test: IMG exam, from which the top 150 are selected&lt;br>
    7) Second test: OSCE exam, from which the final 50 are selected for this PRE-residency UNPAID program.&lt;br>

    8) After all this is completed successfully, then you are eligible to APPLY for a residency in Ontario.&lt;p>

    ABSOLUTELY RIDICULOUS PROCESS.&lt;p>

    9) In Ontario you cannot enter the first or second round of the Canadian CARMS residency match, you have to wait until after the second round. And after the second round there is almost nothing left.
    &lt;p>
    Reality my dear friends. Reality.
    &lt;p>

    The only thing you can get outside of Ontario (other Canadian provinces) is some crappy two year family practice spot that NO canadian grad wanted,
    not to mention that it will be in some boony town where it is -30 (minus thirty) degrees celcius everyday with a non-diverse population, up north (eg goose bay, labrador,
    or north battleford, saskatchewan).
    &lt;p>
    Will you honestly be happy with this?

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">

    &lt;p>&lt;strong>3) Not much left in the second iteration, and nothing left after the second iteration.&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>Let's talk briefly about the CaRMS match.

    &lt;p>Canadian Resident Matching Service

    &lt;br>151 Slater Street, Suite 802

    &lt;br>Ottawa, ON Canada K1P 5H3

    &lt;br>www.carms.ca&lt;br>
    www.carms.ca/stats/stats_index.htm

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>The match is done in two rounds (iterations). The first round is open ONLY to graduates of Canadian medical schools.
    If a Saba student tells you otherwise, he is on crack. (Hey maybe he got some from Kenny . . . bad taste I know, but it had
    to be said).

    &lt;p>The second round is open to IMG's in some provinces. But if you go and visit the CaRMS web site, you will see that
    there is didly squat left in the second round . . . nickel and dime.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">

    &lt;p>&lt;strong>4) B-1 Visa for clinicals.&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>Yes, Canadians need a B-1 Visa to do clinicals in the United States. Apply as early as possible for this otherwise you
    won't be allowed into a hospital to do your rotations.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>Saba administration has the forms, also visit

    &lt;p>US Embassy: www.usembassycanada.gov

    &lt;br>Citizenship and Immigration Canada: www.gic.gc.ca for related info.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>5) The H1-B visa for residency training in the U.S.&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>To get the H1-B visa a residency program in the U.S. has to be willing to sponsor you. Unfortunately very few residency programs in the U.S. do this. To get this visa you will have to write USMLE Step 3 before starting your
    residency. Around twelve states allow candidates to register for this exam before residency (Step 3 is normally written DURING
    residency). The good thing about this visa, is that it can be converted into a green card, which will allow you to live and work in the U.S. permanently.

    &lt;p>To find out which states, visit:

    &lt;br>FSMB (Federation of State Medical Boards): www.fsmb.org

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>To find out about the USMLE Step 3 visit:

    &lt;br>www.usmle.org

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>For info about the J-1 and H1-B Visa's visit:

    &lt;br>www.shusterman.com/toc-phys.html

    &lt;br>www.visalaw.com/IMG/resources.html

    &lt;br>www.myvisa.com/Visasage/Droption.htm

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>
    6) The J-1 visa for residency training in the U.S.
    &lt;p>
    First of all look at the requirements you have to fulfill to get this Visa:
    &lt;p>
    www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hppb/healthcare/pubs/sponsorship/index.html&lt;br>
    www.ecfmg.org/evsp/index.html
    &lt;p>
    To get this visa from the ECFMG you will first need to get an offer from a residency program in the U.S. and you
    will need to get a "Statement of Need" from the Canadian Health Ministry. &lt;p>
    You need to pass the MCCEE before you can get that "Statement of Need" from Canada.
    If you get the J-1 visa, then you are entitled to stay in the U.S. to do a residency.
    But after the residency is completed you have to return to Canada for a minimum of two years. &lt;p>
    Now, what will you do in Canada upon returning? Practice medicine?&lt;br>
    What are the tests/procedures one will have to undergo at this point?
    &lt;br>Read:
    &lt;p>

    www.cou.on.ca/health/HOME/IMG/IMGHomePage.htm&lt;br>
    http://members.tripod.com/donalda13/faq.html
    &lt;p>
    If you are doing a residency in the U.S. on a J-1 visa, it is possible to stay in the U.S. after your residency, if you get a J-1 waiver.
    You can obtain this waiver by agreeing to work as a physician in a health manpower shortage area (rural/underserviced area in the U.S.) for three years.
    &lt;p>
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>7) So as you can see, Canadians are in a different stream than all other IMG's, and that stream is appropriately
    called "pooh poohs Creek". &lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>8) Applying for a residency in the United States:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>To apply for a residency in the U.S. to have to apply through the ERAS

    &lt;br>Electronic Residency Application Service: www.ecfmg.org/erasinfo.htm

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>The U.S. residency match is done by

    &lt;br>NRMP (National resident matching program): www.nrmp.org

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>The list of all available residency positions in the U.S., is nicely summarized at this excellent site:

    &lt;br>FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database):

    &lt;br>www.ama-assn.org/go/freida

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>9) Canadians need to be very realistic about their goals.&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>The worst Saba student, who de-celled twice and failed USMLE on his/her first try (but is a U.S. citizen) will be able
    to get a residency in Internal Medicine in the U.S. without ANY problem. But you as a Canadian, even with a 90 on your USMLE
    and a #3 ranking in your class could still get screwed, blued and tattooed come match time. Hospitals look at applicants
    without a Visa, the way you and I would look at our feces, if we were suffering from inflammatory diarrhea.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    10) It is important to do ALL your clinical rotations (cores and electives) in the U.S.
    &lt;p>

    We have (I hope) already established that Canada is a <u>closed door</u> for IMG’s. So our goal is a residency in the United States. Doing all your clinicals in the U.S. allows you maximum opportunity to make contacts, which are invaluable come residency selection time.

    Also, the USMLE Step 2 exam is based entirely on U.S. clinical experience, doing clinicals outside of the U.S. does not prepare you well for the Step 2 exam. &lt;p>
    Clinical rotations offered in the United States: http://www.finchcms.edu/osa/Resource...veCatalogs.pdf

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>11) Is the United States a nice place to raise a family?&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>For those Canadians afraid to go to the U.S., let me offer you this: there are plenty of places in the U.S. that are as safe,
    and crime free as Goose Bay, Labrador . . . so don't sweat it. You can live a happy life, with your family, keeping your
    culture alive, and your children will have a prosperous future.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>12) Caribbean Medical Schools were never intended or designed to educate Canadians. &lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>They were opened to cater to rejected U.S. applicants. That is the whole premise, and that is for whom this whole system
    is geared toward. But what happened over the years is that, it became so ridiculously difficult to gain admission into a
    Canadian medical school that many, many Canadian students flocked down to the Caribbean. &lt;p>

    The Association of Canadian Medical Colleges states in their manual every year: &lt;p>

    "Applicants should be aware that enrolling in dubious, proprietary, for-profit medical schools opened specifically to cater to rejected applicants to medical schools in Canada or the USA is highly unlikely to be a path to practising medicine in Canada."
    &lt;p>
    Verification: www.cfms.org/premed/articles.asp?premed_id=3
    &lt;p>
    The American Association
    of Medical Colleges (www.aamc.org) publishes a list annually of the most difficult places to gain admission into a
    medical school. Ontario tops the list every year, followed by California, New York, British Columbia and Texas.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>13) Let's help each other.&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>I love to share info I have gathered with my fellow Canadians.&lt;strong> &lt;/strong>If you know something that I don't, please share it with
    me, I am willing to listen, but please back it up with proof and fact. As one of my Canadian classmates - James Brown
    would say --> "During a drought, don't piss on my leg, and tell me it's raining". In other words, don't give me false hope,
    (Saba's James Brown is not related to the Godfather of soul, actually he's a white guy).

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p> . . . depressed? Don't be! Here's what you need to do:

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>14) My advice (what I have been saying since day one):&lt;/strong>

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>a) Write the USMLE Step 1, Step 2, TOEFL, and CSA.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>b) Get your ECFMG certificate.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>c) Apply for a residency in the United States.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>(There a lot of opportunities in the U.S., as long as you choose an IMG friendly residency: e.g., internal medicine,
    psychiatry, family practice etc., things can work out.

    &lt;p>Saba is one of the few good Caribbean medical schools, and they are recognized with residency directors all over the
    U.S.)

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>d) As soon as you graduate and obtain the ECFMG certificate write USMLE Step 3 and apply for your H1-B Visa.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>(USMLE Step 3, is the easiest of the three steps, it consists of 500 MCQ's and 9 CCS cases)

    &lt;p>Take a look at these sites for partial lists of IMG friendly hospitals in the U.S. that sponsor the H1-B visa for residency:

    &lt;p>www.foreign-md.com&lt;br>
    www.csa-notes.com )
    &lt;p>
    Look into the J-1 exchange visa as a possible option as well. This visa used to be very difficult to get as a Canadian,
    but as of this year (2001), the Canadian Ministry of Health has loosened up their policies. Thank God.&lt;p>

    You will need to write and pass the MCCEE in Canada. Then you need to get a "Statement of Need" letter from Health Canada. Once you have this, and an offer from a residency program in the United States, you can at this point, apply for a J-1 visa with the ECFMG.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>e) If you are single, marry a U.S. citizen.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>(There is one guy here who has already done so, and he will have a nice shiny green card
    (permanent resident status) in his wallet pretty soon as a result)

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>Whew! Well, that's it for now my Canadian friends. I hope this has provoked some thought.

    &lt;p>I sincerely wish you all the best of luck.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>**** ****
    &lt;br>Saba University School of Medicine
    &lt;br>March 2003

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>Foreign Medical Graduates! Please email me your story --> &lt;a href="mailto:****_****[email protected]?subject=For eign Medical Graduates">****_****[email protected]&lt;/a>
    &lt;p>
    CARIBBEAN MEDICAL SCHOOLS&lt;br>
    A Guide for Canadians . . . and everyone else!&lt;p>
    www.[blocked by request].com
    &lt;p>
    &lt;hr>
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    <u>Frequently Asked Questions - Answered</u>&lt;p>
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>QUESTION 1: &lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>Hi, is it true that IMG's (who are Canadian citizens) who do their clinical rotations in Canada can get
    exempted from the one year of postgraduate training requirement in Ontario?

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>ANSWER 1:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>Dear ****:

    &lt;br>To become licensed to practice medicine in Ontario, IMGs must complete the Ontario IMG Program
    and a postgraduate residency program. Currently, there are no exemptions from any part of the
    postgraduate training. They must be either Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada to
    qualify for admission into the IMG Program. IMGs who are not Canadians or permanent residents are not eligible for residency training in Ontario.

    &lt;p>If you are referring to the clinical rotations in medical school, the answer is no - clincal rotations in
    Canada do not exempt you from the IMG Program requirement. You would still be considered an IMG,
    and be required to go through the IMG Program.

    &lt;p>You may obtain further information about the Ontario IMG Program on our web site.
    &lt;br>I hope this answers your question, but if not, please let me know.
    &lt;p>
    Regards, &lt;br>
    Mary Cunningham

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>QUESTION 2:&lt;/strong>
    &lt;p>
    Hi, can you please tell me a little more about the Ontario IMG program?

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>ANSWER 2:&lt;/strong>
    &lt;p>
    Dear ****: &lt;br>

    IMG Program applicants must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents,
    must live in Ontario for twelve months prior to the Program, and must pass
    the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Exam, among others. The IMG
    Program has a competitive entrance process involving written and clinical
    exams.
    &lt;br>There are 50 positions available annually; we had 450 candidates
    sit for our entrance exams last year. Also, you need to be aware that the IMG
    Program has been targeted to underserviced medical specialties, and
    therefore your choice of residency or medical specialty may be restricted. &lt;br>
    Please visit our web site for more information on the
    Ontario IMG Program, or feel free to write me with your questions.
    &lt;p>
    Regards, &lt;br>
    Mary Cunningham

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>QUESTION 3:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>Hi thank you for answering my questions!
    one more: &lt;br>
    how do they get residencies? &lt;br>
    outside the match? &lt;br>

    &lt;p>because they can't get residencies in the match, because in Ontario IMG's can't enter the first or second
    round of the CaRMS match and after the second round there is nothing left.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>ANSWER 3:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>Yes - OIMGP residencies are separate from the CaRMS match.

    &lt;br>There is a "mini-match" for the trainees in the Ontario IMG Program, which is not run through CaRMS,
    but is set up in a similar manner. Because the Ontario government has targeted the IMG Program at
    underserviced specialties and areas of Ontario, there is a restricted list of residency programs for

    &lt;br>which IMGs are eligible. The 2000/01 list is posted on the IMG web site at:
    &lt;p>http://www.library.utoronto.ca/medic...hanges2000.htm
    &lt;p>This list is subject to change for future sessions of the IMG Program.
    &lt;p>Mary Cunningham
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">

    &lt;p>&lt;strong>QUESTION 4:&lt;/strong>
    &lt;p>
    Hi, regarding the OIMGP at
    &lt;br>
    http://www.library.utoronto.ca/medic...quirements.htm
    &lt;br>
    and the requirement that:
    &lt;p>
    "All applicants must have lived in the Province of Ontario for a minimum
    of 12 consecutive months immediately prior to the commencement date of the
    International Medical Graduate Program"
    &lt;p>
    How can I be living in Ontario for a year prior to the start of the
    program when I am doing my clinical rotations in the USA?
    &lt;p>
    Some say -> "do your clinical rotations in Canada". But Canada only allows
    a maximum of 12 wks of clinical rotations for students attending foreign
    medical schools. &lt;br>
    (Source:www.acmc.ca, ***** Hawkins: [email protected]).
    &lt;p>
    Does anyone have an answer for this?

    &lt;p>&lt;strong>ANSWER 4:&lt;/strong>
    &lt;p>Dear ****: &lt;br>
    You must reside in the Province of Ontario to qualify for admission to the
    Ontario International Medical Graduate Program. If you are currently doing
    clinical rotations in the USA, then you do not qualify for admission at
    this time.&lt;br>
    You may become eligible for the OIMGP at some future
    date, provided you relocate to Ontario to live, and you also meet the
    other admission requirements. &lt;br>
    I hope this helps clarify the issue for you.
    &lt;p>
    Regards, &lt;br>
    &lt;p>Mary Cunningham, Administrative Coordinator
    &lt;br>Ontario International Medical Graduate Program
    &lt;br>email: [email protected]

    &lt;p>&lt;strong>QUESTION 5:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>Can you please give me some information about requirement for obtaining a license to practice medicine
    in Canada?

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>ANSWER 5: &lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>Good morning:
    &lt;br>In response to your request, we attach a memorandum which we hope will be useful. You may wish
    to visit our web site at: http://rcpsc.medical.org/english

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>C. Fronton [email protected]
    &lt;br>Office of Education-Credentials
    &lt;br>Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
    &lt;br>774 Echo Drive
    &lt;br>Ottawa ON KlS 5N8
    &lt;br>1 800 668 3740 ext 7750
    &lt;br>Fax 613 730 8261

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>QUESTION 6:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>Hi, can you please give me information regarding residencies that are available outside the match in
    Canada, thanks.
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>ANSWER 6:&lt;/strong>
    &lt;p>In reply to your inquiry, none that we are aware of.
    &lt;p>Lynda Nesbitt ([email protected])&lt;br>
    CaRMS www.carms.ca

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>QUESTION 7:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>If a student from a foreign medical school who is a Canadian citizen does their clinical rotations in
    Canada are they excempt from the MCCEE (evaluating exam)?

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>ANSWER 7:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>I have contacted the Medical Council of Canada www.mcc.ca, and the answer is no, as one will still be considered
    a foreign graduate.

    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>QUESTION 8:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>Hi, can you tell me how realistic it is for an IMG (International Medical Graduate)
    (who is a Canadian citizen) to be able to get a J-1 visa to do his/her residency in the United States? thank you
    &lt;br wp="br1">&lt;br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>&lt;strong>ANSWER 8:&lt;/strong>

    &lt;p>It is realistic to consider applying to Health Canada via the provincial
    authorities for a "statement of need" for the application to ECFMG for a J-1
    Visa.

    If you prefer, I can mail the document to the address that you have provided.
    &lt;p>Please let me know if you would like to have the document mailed to you.

    &lt;p>
    ******************************
    &lt;p>
    My current address is as follows: &lt;br>

    ********** &lt;br>
    Program Administrator (Statement of Need) &lt;br>
    Health Canada &lt;br>
    Jeanne Mance Building, Address Locator ***** &lt;br>
    Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1B4
    &lt;p>
    &lt;hr>
    &lt;p>
    <u>E-mails I have received:</u>&lt;p>
    Dear ****:
    &lt;p>
    Hi. My name is Mark Gallow. I am a Canadian. I graduated from AUC in 1995. I completed a 3 year FP residency at St. John Hospital &amp; Medical Center in Detroit, Michigan in July 2000. I had to wait 2 years (1995-97) for a "green card" before starting a residency. I am Board Certified in FP and work for a small practice in Warren, MI. I live in Windsor, Ontario and cross over to Michigan each day.&lt;p>

    I compliment you on the accuracy of your site. If anyone disputes your findings tell them that I and many others have researched this and have found it difficult or impossible to overcome the obstacles to return to Canada. Your findings are RIGHT. &lt;p>
    You may want to revise some things since the situation in Canada is changing because of the critical shortage of physicians. I have been contacted by recruiters for medical placements in Canada. They inform me that the Western provinces of Sask, Alta and BC have in the past provided temporary licensing to physicians willing to work in underserviced areas. I was offered a job in rural BC for $220,000.00 (that's right) by one of the recruiting services- Canadian Medical Placement Services, (they have a web site). &lt;p>
    I was originally contacted by Dr. Sussman. If you check the Ontario Parlimentary site for May 31, 2001, you will find my name mentioned by Windsor MPP Sandra Pupatello as an example of how stupid the barriers are to well qualified Canadians working in the US who want to return to Canada. It may be several months before any changes occur but if you want to return to Canada hope exists.&lt;p>
    I have done numerous local interviews with newspapers, radio and television. I had a 15 minute face-to-face meeting with the Minister of Health in Ontario - Tony Clement - to advise him of the terrible situation Canadians have returning to practice in Canada. He agreed that changes needed to be made. There may be another method of returning. In New Brunswick they grant reciprocity to licensed physicians in the Maine. Ontario may soon be forced to grant a reciprocal license to MD licensed in another province because of federal legistration requiring free movement of professional individuals. The Act has been passed and is due to be in force July 1, 2001. One of my classmates is in NB now.&lt;p>
    Please feel free to contact me if you have other questions.

    &lt;p>
    Mark Gallow, M.D.&lt;br>
    [email protected]&lt;p>
    &lt;hr>
    &lt;p>
    Hi ****:
    &lt;p>
    I just read your open letter to Canadians. I am a
    Canadian who lived in Canada for over 17 years. I
    completed my high school and undergrad in Ontario and
    then went to Spartan. I graduated in 1995.
    &lt;p>
    I passed the USMLE 1, 2 and 3. Got a H1 visa (Canada
    screwed me for 2 years over the J1 visa - I did not know
    about their restriction in 1995). Completed a family
    practice residency in the U.S. in 2000 and now am
    practising.
    &lt;p>
    Right after graduation in 1995, I passed MCCEE, QE1, QE2
    and held the LMCC and went through Carms twice...NO
    MATCH in Canada.
    &lt;p>
    What's the lesson here?
    &lt;p>
    Take the USMLE exams, all of them ASAP. Take all the
    Canadian exams, ASAP. NEVER say, I wont need this. You
    WILL need them.
    &lt;p>
    In 1995, things were more restricted. Only 24
    positions in IMG, NO WAY to get J1 letter from
    Canada,etc. Now, Canada is in crisis with shortage of
    doctors. I am practising in Edmonton. I will take the
    CFPC exam in May and move back to Toronto soon. I
    already have my "Diplomat of the American board of
    family practice" (even though, I dont NEED it).
    &lt;p>
    By the way, as far as residency or work in Canada...DO
    NOT count on it at all. Apply in both countries if you
    can. It will work out. Dont worry. I was in a similar
    situation. I completely understand the frustration.
    &lt;p>
    Email me if you have questions. It is sad that Canada
    restricts us so much, when it needs doctors so bad. It
    is also sad that we have to go to Caribbean for
    medicine! Say hi to guys in Saba!
    &lt;p>
    Regards, &lt;br>
    Vali Satei, M.D. &lt;br>
    [email protected]&lt;p>
    &lt;hr>
    &lt;br>
    ". . .hope, is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies"&lt;br>
    Tim Robbins "Shawshank Redemption" 1994&lt;p>
    &lt;hr>
    &lt;p>
    &lt;center>
    Canada is a <u>closed door</u> for International Medical Graduates&lt;p>
    Even for those who are Canadian Citizens&lt;p>
    Take a look:
    &lt;br>
    &lt;img src="http://[blocked by request].com/images/steps.gif" width="500" height="920">
    &lt;hr>

    &lt;/TD>
    &lt;/TR>
    &lt;/TABLE>&lt;/P>
    &lt;/body>
    &lt;/html>

  4. #4
    CanIMG is offline Moderator
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    Re: [b]J-1 and H-1B Visa info for Canadians[/b]

    "I am going to come back to Canada, after doing a residency in the United States"&lt;/strong>

    <br wp="br1"><br wp="br2">
    &lt;p>
    This won't happen. After you finish residency in the U.S. and return to Canada, you cannot practice medicine. Why?
    Because Canada does not accept the USMLE, Canada does not accept the ECFMG certificate. To work in Canada as a doctor you would
    have to do the entire Canadian certification process all over again. That's right, you would have to write MCCEE, MCCQE Part 1, MCCQE Part 2,
    and the Canadian board exams for the residency that you did in the United States.
    &lt;p>
    Also you may have to do extra year(s) of residency training in Canada, for example if you did an Internal Medicine residency
    in U.S. you would have to do one more year of residency in Canada.
    &lt;p>
    Also to go through that whole process to come back to Canada to make a lot less money makes no sense either.
    After you finish your residency in the U.S. you will be offered a job for $150,000 (that's U.S. dollars).


    You are trying to tell me, you will pass this up to go back to Penetanguishene, Ontario to
    work in some rural area for $110,000 Canadian dollars (which converts to only $69,000 U.S. dollars by the way).
    &lt;p>
    Verification: http://jobfutures.ca/fos/M521.shtml
    &lt;p>

    <br wp="br1"><br wp="br2">


    F) "I <u>absolutely will</u> go back to Canada to live, after doing a residency in the United States"
    &lt;p>
    O.k. since you persist with this, let's entertain this delusional comment.
    &lt;p>
    To obtain a residency in the U.S. you have to pass USMLE Step 1 and USMLE Step 2. Then during your U.S.
    residency you have to pass USMLE Step 3. Then to graduate from that program you have to pass the residency board exam. For example, if you
    are doing a residency in the U.S. in Family Practice, you have to pass the U.S. Family Practice board exam. Let's see, so far there are four board exams you need to pass.
    &lt;p>
    Now after you complete all this and go back to Canada, you must write all the Canadian board exams in order to obtain a license to practice medicine in Canada. Those tests are the:
    MCCEE, MCCQE Part 1, MCCQE Part 2, and the Canadian Family Practice board exam. That's another four board exams.
    &lt;p>
    I know people who could not even pass USMLE Step 1. It is impossible for me to believe that they will pass <u>eight</u> board exams. Whatever. . .
    &lt;p>
    Even if you did achieve this phenomenal and miraculous feat of academia, it would result in you ending up in some rural area like Northern Manitoba or the Yukon, earning half the
    salary that you could earn in the United States.
    While you provide some good information, I disagree with you on several points.

    Firstly, I suggest that IMGs write the Canadian examinations at their appropriate time, eg, write MCCQE1 around the same time you write your USMLE 2. This way you write the test when the info is fresh in your mind...it would be silly to wait until after residency to start the Canadian exams (as you suggest). Next, why is it so hard to write a few extra exams? Let me ask you a question, how many exams have you written in your life? It is very strange of you to refer to an additional 4 exams as a "phenomenal and miraculous feat of academia". As for your friends who could not pass the USMLE1, Canada certainly doesn't want them.

    Furthemore, I resent your characterization of my way of thinking as "delusional". This is an irresponsible comment and is insulting to your readers.

    You have fallen into the trap of believing that "normal" people think the same way as you. What you must realize is that different people have different priorities, values and beliefs. Some people do not place as much importance on making the maximum amount of money as you do. Maybe my beliefs are such that it's more important to be close to loved ones, a more humane medical system, or god forbid, the country that I love. Perhaps I come from a rural community and would be happy to practice there for the single year's experience I will require to obtain my unrestricted Ontario license. As a whole, Canadian IMGs are an intelligent bunch...we are capable of weighing the pros and cons of returning to Canada on our own without having to be subjected to your personal views. In short, live and let live.

    Your letter is a more of an editorial than informational, and this is of course your right. I know you have a penchant for expressing your ideas both publicly and forcefully . Don't allow it to be to your detriment.
    CanIMG
    Moderator - Canadian IMG and Immigration Visa Forums

  5. #5
    stepchow is offline Junior Member
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    Re: [b]J-1 and H-1B Visa info for Canadians[/b]

    Just a quick question. I have obtained an IM residency in the US and they are sponsoring an H1 visa for me this year. If after completing my 3 years in IM in the US, would I be able to return to Canada and practice as an internist? I'm just wondering since the IM programs in Canada are 4 years long. Thanks!


    Stephen Chow, MD

  6. #6
    Kirst is offline Senior Member
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    Re: [b]J-1 and H-1B Visa info for Canadians[/b]

    from what i've looked into... it is extremely difficult, if not nearly impossible, to come back to canada for a full practice as an IMG. simply put, if you have not:

    1. graduated from a canadian medical school
    2. received a minimum of 2 years in post graduate residency training in canadian teaching hospitals
    3. written and passed all three exams

    you're better off trying to catch a star.

    it seems like the one of the not-as-difficult and actually 'possible' way to practice in canada as an IMG, would be to obtain one of the non-existent residency slot unfilled in canada. and you may be able to slightly improve your chances during the match by orientating your clerkships in canada and establishing some connections to support your application. even so, you need to be pretty keen with the application requirements and deadlines, as different provinces have different regulations with regards to handing out residency positions to IMGs (ie. must be a canadian citizen, must have passed or written MCC EE, etc).

    hope that somewhat addressed your question, but i suggest you consult other sources.

    and... this brings me to my next question. for CanIMG!

    if i study abroad, rotate in canadian teaching hospitals for clerkship, and with amazing luck and hard work, match for residency in canada- would this route hurt my chances at practicing in states (assuming that CSA and all USMLE exams are written and passed, ECFMG obtained, some elective/selective rotations done in states)? I am not sure how transferable a canadian specialty board certification would be to states.

  7. #7
    indn4ever is offline Junior Member
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    Re: [b]J-1 and H-1B Visa info for Canadians[/b]

    Here's a question. What if you are a Canadian citizen and attend lets say St. George's University, and do all your clinicals in the US. Can you find a US hospital that will sponsor you for an H-1B visa to do your residency? This is so that you dont have to return to Canada for the 2 years. Hence, wouldnt the hospital you are doing your residency at sponsor you to work in the US on an H-1B visa? I ask this because though I am a Canadian citizen, I would eventually like to settle down in the US and have been here in the US for quite some time. Is this a possibility? Do hospitals sponsor their doctors for H-1B visas? Any input is greatly appreciated.

  8. #8
    stepchow is offline Junior Member
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    Re: [b]J-1 and H-1B Visa info for Canadians[/b]

    Yes this is a definate possibility. I am a canadian and a hospital is sponsoring me for and H1 visa. Afterwards, I can stay in the US without having to return to Canada for 2 years like the J1. Keep in mind that not all hospitals sponsor H1's since it is an expensive and lengthy process. I have put close to $1500 US towards expediting my visa so far, and that's with the hospital footing part of the bill. And for those of u canadians who are going to participate in the 2004 match, call/email the programs first to see if they sponsor visas. Otherwise you'll just end up wasting a lot of you money through ERAS. To give u a rough estimate, of all the IM programs I called (most of the country), about half sponsored some kind of visa (J1 &/or H1). And of that half, about 20% of them sponsored H1's. So u really can't be too picky on where u go if u want a H1.

  9. #9
    anoncan is offline Junior Member
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    Re: [b]J-1 and H-1B Visa info for Canadians[/b]

    http://www.valuemd.com/viewtopic.php?t=277











    Edited by forum moderator 4/11/03

  10. #10
    anoncan is offline Junior Member
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    Re: J-1

    J-1 Visa sucks!

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