i posted this in another forum, but thought it might be useful here.
This applies to Canadians wanting to practice and get licensed in Canada. Read carefully. This is accurate at the time of posting

Semesters 1-5 with Comp then
You will do Step 1 USMLE

Semester 8 somewhere around this time
Step 2 CS & CK

DO CANADIAN ELECTIVES -AS MANY AS POSSIBLE. TO GET REFERENCES AND GET KNOWN IF YOU ARE APPLYING TO A RESIDENCY IN CANADA

Get ECFMG clearance and also registration of qualifications in Canada so that you can do the MCCEE and enter the Canadian match You MUST do the MCCEE to enterthe Canadian match. USMLE will not count for CaRMS application

MCCEE

Apply to CaRMS (Canadian residency matching service) and US match
MD

For safety do MCCQE1 also after the MCCEE - gives you extra kudos when applying for Canadian residency
For licensure purposes USMLE and American Boards are not equivalent to Canadian exams except in a couple of provinces. Family Practice Certification in the USA will allow you to get a licence to practice FP in Canada in most provinces.
Near the end of PGY1 year residency in the USA Step 3 then speciality boards after completing residency. This will allow you to practice IF you can get a green cardOtherwise you have to go back to Canada for a time before applying for permanent residency in the USA- and you won't be able to work in Canada (no license!)

If doing a residency in the USA, do speciality Boards- if you then wish to go to Canada to practice as a specialist you will have to have your training assessed by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. They may ask you to do more training before you are allowed to write the Canadian Fellowship exams. You cannot practice in Canada as a specialist without a Fellowship of the Royal College. (Tough exams) or an agreement from the licensing province that your US board certification is adequate in your speciality- in underserviced areas you may be able to do this- certainly not in Toronto ,Montreal, Vancouver. Internal medicine and peds in the USA are primary care and three years training. In Canada at least 4 years training.

I hope this time line helps. It's hard to get into Canada for residency, but it's worth it. The training is all University based and the quality is standardised right across the country. Residency in Canada is always done in a University affiliated hospital with faculty on the staff of that University.