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  1. #1
    DPR
    DPR is offline Junior Member
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    Transfer to Australian Med School from US Medical School

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    I was wondering if the Australian schools are willing to take a transfer from a U.S. medical school? I welcome any advice or input (i.e., who to contact, student transfer policies etc.).
    Thanks,
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    Last edited by DPR; 03-05-2007 at 04:45 PM.

  2. #2
    pitman is offline Senior Member 510 points
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    ..

    I think how they take this would be more dependent on the 'official' version of what happened -- what were you dismissed for, according to the school? Can you say that you left for financial or personal reasons? etc. Note that you'd likely have to start over in an Aussie school.

    -pitman

  3. #3
    doctor_with_no_country is offline Junior Member
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    Is this really a "transfer"

    First of all, I admire you for sticking with your legal battle. I hope you win.

    I think you would find yourself a bit overqualified in terms of sophistication, edcuation and experience for life in an Ozzie undergrad (and they are all undergrad) medical school. And absolutely bored out of your wits. (You can work 20 hours/wk though.)

    I doubt you could realistically transfer here. The curriculums are structured differently. (But it is worth asking about. Exceptions are often the rule. You may have the "numbers" to shock them into letting you enter the third year.) However, you could get in. No problem! The main criteria are MCAT (I am sure you are very solidly above 24), grades (doubt it's a problem) and the interview (You have lobbying experience so we know you can talk!).

    When I applied (through ACER), they only asked for undergraduate grades and I think that is all I sent them. I have a graduate degree but I didn't tell them because I think it gives the impression of being an "eternal student".

    As for getting "kicked out", I'm not sure they asked? Even if you tick yes, I doubt that it would factor in or even come up. I mean, how would they weight it. Then again, I'm not sure what you were kicked out for! If you apply "anew", Try to get around disclosing that you have ever been to med school!

    You can rest assured that your penchant for political involvement would probably not be welcome here. Questioning authority is frowned upon. Good students are seen but not heard.

    Why not try to transfer to a US or offshore school (where your 2 years and having passed step 1 will count for something). Why not make your "case" a selling point. (Again, I'm not sure what you were kicked out for!) It sounds like you may have some neat experiences and an unusual perspective.

    Good luck. Frankly, with your credentials, I would not bother with the Ozzie system (unless you can get your degree in 2 years and work part time to fight off the boredom and derive some sense of accomplishment). It is pitched to a very low level.

    As for "official" contacts, just go to the schools' websites. As for trying to wiggle in as a third year, you aren't likely to get anywhere starting with the admissions people. You might approach the Deans of these schools directly and try to sell them you interesting case. Or use any "connections" you may have here.

  4. #4
    pitman is offline Senior Member 510 points
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    Re: Is this really a "transfer"

    Quote Originally Posted by doctor_with_no_country
    I think you would find yourself a bit overqualified in terms of sophistication, edcuation and experience for life in an Ozzie undergrad (and they are all undergrad) medical school. And absolutely bored out of your wits. (You can work 20 hours/wk though.)
    This is one of the more stupid remarks I've heard doc_with_no_country make. Keep in mind that he has had his own experience with his own school, and he's expressed a lot of unhappiness with where he's at and the decisions he's made. Such gross generalizations as above are just plain silly. As with any grad med programme, there'll be 'kids', even one or two 19 year olds in this country where some students can get a uni degree in two years, while there will also be many who are much more mature with a lot of education, research background, and other "experience", and in some respects with more diverse backgrounds than found in the US. I wonder why he hasn't sought them out.

    As to what doc could be meaningfully claiming with, "they are all undergrad", I have no idea -- maybe he should read the many silly threads here and at SDN where some try to read a little too much into the term 'Bachelors' used in the accolade 'MBBS'. And anyone who's "bored" in med school apparently has not the maturity or motivation to step up and do what he thinks is required supra-curricularly to be the good doctor he'd like to be.

    As a non-traditional (much older) student, with many years of research and work experience, and a fair amount of travel and volunteer experience in the 3rd world and other places, I do indeed find that many students are 'immature', often generalizing about life and thinking that their own situation or backyard represents the world (or country) at large. but this is non-unique -- i know many in US schools, particularly Cornell, and at all, in fact at all stages of medical training, you'll find a large such range of maturity levels. Do I think the Autralian students are less mature/sophisticated than their US counterparts? On average, in some ways yes, in other ways, no. There's less arrogance here for sure.

    I doubt you could realistically transfer here. The curriculums are structured differently. (But it is worth asking about. Exceptions are often the rule. You may have the "numbers" to shock them into letting you enter the third year.) However, you could get in. No problem! The main criteria are MCAT (I am sure you are very solidly above 24), grades (doubt it's a problem) and the interview (You have lobbying experience so we know you can talk!).
    I agree that transferring is unlikely a possibility. Transferring is practically unheard of, but it does occasionally happen WITHIN australia (e.g., a flinders guy transferred to sydney last year to be with his wife, said it was a real headache trying to do so, forgot his name but he can be found in the SDN archives). Chances are you'd have to start over.

    If your MCAT is above 24, you'll get an interview at USyd and UQ, the largest schools, maybe a few more like the new schools, but count on a 30 to be a strong candidate at any. Except doc_with_no_country will claim it's a sure thing at USyd with much lower scores.

    Each school will weigh your application differently -- flinders weighs mcat, interview and gpa equally, UQ has a low gpa cutoff then weighs interview and mcat equally, usyd chiefly weeds by interview once you get one, etc.

    As for getting "kicked out", I'm not sure they asked? Even if you tick yes, I doubt that it would factor in or even come up. I mean, how would they weight it. Then again, I'm not sure what you were kicked out for! If you apply "anew", Try to get around disclosing that you have ever been to med school!
    I also agree that you may not want to bring up your prior training, but that's an ethical issue for you alone to decide, and potentially a practical one if it requires you to lie on an application (also not sure if they ask).

    You can rest assured that your penchant for political involvement would probably not be welcome here. Questioning authority is frowned upon. Good students are seen but not heard.
    This too is a gross over-generalization. USyd does indeed have a problem of administration not listening to students' gripes, it's often discussed by the students, while some schools are somewhat (UQ) to fairly (Flinders) receptive, and I would say that although aussie students do in fact tend to refrain from (openly) questioning academic authorities in their (different) education system, those, including me, who have so challenged the admin have been able to be heard and can make changes, if you're so inclined and caring to do so. In fact, some will express envy when you do . Also note that Aussies have what they call a 'tall poppy syndrome', i.e., many do not like what *appears* to be those attempting to achieve a higher (social, political, managerial) status or position (thus the envy from those who "fear" and react to the syndrome). This is also a generalization, in part since obviously it's about knowing how to do so in this environment, where ppl obviously do "rise up" in any field, for example in politics, or socially, for that matter. Just that it's 'different', and has its own protocols and convoluted ways. As anywhere, you can either ignore such politics in life, challenge them, or ride them.

    It is pitched to a very low level.
    whatever dude.

    -pitman

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