There has been much controversy over this article quoted previously on this site. There also seems to much confusion and misunderstanding. I am seeking to explain the issues involved and hopefully get some feedback about problems experienced in other schools.

I am a graduate of the School and was quoted in the article in my position as a representative of the Australian Medical Students Association, the peak body representing medical students in Australia which has close associations with the Australian Medical Council, Committee of Deans of Australian Medical School and The Australian Medical Association.

The Tasmanian Medical School (TSOM) is one of the oldest and most respected medical schools in Australia. It typically graduates just 60-70 graduates per academic year. Only 9-13 places are offered to overseas students and the majority of students are Tasmanian. Its strength has been in its small class numbers, early (year 3) unlimited clinical exposure, and extensive elective program.

The Tasmanian Department of Health pays the specialists at the Royal Hobart Hospital who train us. They are not getting paid enough, get lousy workplace agreements, and are losing staff in droves. As a result, the teaching of students is suffering. The TSOM is in the process of converting to a 5 year undergraduate course from the traditional 6 year course. This new course will attract around 100 new students some 2006. The worry is that with the downtrend in staffing at the Royal Hobart, the course will struggle to provide the students with the same excellence in teaching I received when at school.

Furthermore:
1. The woman who wrote this article is not the mother of someone who failed or something to that effect.
2. This is a problem facing all medical schools across Australia, particularly in Western Australia, the University of Queensland and at the University of NSW where new medical schools are seeking to share resources with already under-resourced schools.
3. For further info goto www.amsa.org.au

Random banter would be appreciated

Dr. Leigh Dahlenburg
Royal Hobart Hospital