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  1. #1
    rljohio is offline Newbie
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    Impact of recent law changes??

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    Hello to all!!

    Ive noticed that the info given in this forum and most of the websites involved with the issue of foreign physicians interested in practicing in Australia is out of date because they still consider the medical profession out of the Skilled Occupations List.

    With the recent inclusion of medical practitioners (general and specialists) in the SOL, I wanted to ask which is going to be the impact for specialists trained overseas interested in migrating to Australia?. Does migration as a skilled professional give you permanent resident status immediately or do you have to wait for a period of time??, Do recent changes in law mean that a specialist trained abroad will be able to eventually enter a subespecialisation program in Australia and compete with ozzies in the same terms?.

    Finally how is the field for paediatricians in Australia, are they in demand?

    Thanks anticipated for your kind comments and answers,

    Rafo

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    Impact of recent law changes??

    This will not change much for the ppl coming from overseas. That is still tough b/c they are still making you take all the certification exams, which they have actually made harder. so what this means is that technically you might be able to get a pr but you won't be able to practice. The main aim of this rule was to target med students that are internationals in australia and are already trained in their schools.


    Quote Originally Posted by rljohio
    Hello to all!!

    Ive noticed that the info given in this forum and most of the websites involved with the issue of foreign physicians interested in practicing in Australia is out of date because they still consider the medical profession out of the Skilled Occupations List.

    With the recent inclusion of medical practitioners (general and specialists) in the SOL, I wanted to ask which is going to be the impact for specialists trained overseas interested in migrating to Australia?. Does migration as a skilled professional give you permanent resident status immediately or do you have to wait for a period of time??, Do recent changes in law mean that a specialist trained abroad will be able to eventually enter a subespecialisation program in Australia and compete with ozzies in the same terms?.

    Finally how is the field for paediatricians in Australia, are they in demand?

    Thanks anticipated for your kind comments and answers,

    Rafo

  3. #3
    rljohio is offline Newbie
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    Is it really that hard????

    Hi redshifteffectz! and thank you for your reply...

    Your answer discouraged me a little, but I have to ask...is it really that hard to pass the AMC test???, I suppose it must be as hard as the USMLE, but harder??? How much harder is it? Can you explain a little more?. Are you saying that Australian graduates have some kind of advantage in the exam just for having studied there??? A little hard to understand.
    When you say: "technically you might be able to get a pr but you won't be able to practice"...what do you mean exactly?? I thought that if I had a pr (meaning I had already passed the AMC tests) I was elegible for a job just like anyone else or am I missing some hidden conditions in the immigration policies?

    Now, is the AMC exam only administered in Australia or is there a way to take it overseas like the USMLE?. Ok, suppose I pass it...in theory, I will be able to work or enter a residency program wherever and whenever I want to, right? Or will I have less rights than the people who graduated in Australian med schools?

    From my point of view, Australian rules say this: "If youre good enough to pass our tests, then you are given license to practice medicine in Australia"...is this true or is the picture different in real life?...is there nationality discrimination at the time of hiring physicians?.

    Sorry for so many questions, but Im confused with all of this and I will appreciate it so much if someone could clarify things for me.

    Rafo

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    Is it really that hard????

    I can give you a rough guide of how difficult the AMC exam might be just from some of the international docs i've seen that have taken it. Most take an average of three or four times to pass it...so if you are determined and have the right resources it is possible to get through it. The main problem with the test is that it's very difficult to get good information on what to study for ...unlike the USMLE where you can get books from any major store or online, and the numerous forums dedicated to helping you pass the exam, there is little for the AMC....hopefully that will change.

    Austrailan graduates whether international or otherwise are not required to take this exam, this is only for doctors that are trained overseas who are interested in migrating to and practicing in Australia.

    Basically the PR system is independent of the registration process to become a doctor - thus even if you qualify for a PR and get one, you still have to pass all the relevant exams to become a doctor. Thus yes you might be able to get a PR easily - but it will still be difficult to become a fully licensed doctor.

    I think that the Australian system is just difficult to get established in...there is discrimination against overseas doctors, but the "good" thing is that it's not based on what country you are from - they do it equally to American, British etc docs. Though I think the Americans have it worse only because I've seen many American docs that are unlicensed and have told me they have very few hopes in doing so, while so many British docs are consultants here...can't explain the exact reason why.

    Hope this clears up some info for anyone else interested!

  5. #5
    pitman is offline Senior Member 510 points
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    Impact of recent law changes??

    Quote Originally Posted by rljohio
    With the recent inclusion of medical practitioners (general and specialists) in the SOL...
    When did this happen? How many points?

    Does anyone have any references for analysis of this (particularly the motivation, connection with full-fee domestic slots,...).

    -pitman

  6. #6
    pitman is offline Senior Member 510 points
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    wow!

    Sweet mother of god! we been studying too hard to notice the good news!

    60 points / 110 for medical doctors

    SOL:
    http://www.immi.gov.au/allforms/pdf/1121i_1.pdf

    Extra pts for Skilled Demand:
    http://www.workpermit.com/australia/...emand_list.htm

    Points test (they haven't updated this form, so pick some random 60pt skill):
    http://www.workpermit.com/australia/point_test.htm

    Since most students here who'd want to stay could easily get sponsorship in rural (or under-served urban) areas, should be no problem to get at least 115 pts.

    They were added to the list in May(?) I was arguing with AMAQ just in March about this..

    -pitman

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    wow!

    Pitman,

    Good to see you again!

    I just atted a PR forum this last friday and i found out some good and bad news. The bad news is that to get a PR you need to have your one year internship first (the RMO route that i talked about is still valid though.) during which you are sponsored on a 422 bridging visa for upto 4 years. YOu can apply for your PR at any point after your internship which is 12 mons in duration.

    The tricky part then is getting the internship, these are becoming difficult to get especially for you post grads as the number of local students admitted is rising, as well as the fact that you are all in big cities. So most of you will end up applying to either tassie or WA for your internship, both of which give preference to their own internationals first.

    There may be a way around this, as for the purposes of registration I heard that it's possible to do your internship in either m'sia or singapore which have an abundance of spots and don't require any citizenship/PR status to hire you. You can then apply for a PR after this, as long as your internship is recognized.

    have you heard about this? Most importantly can you confirm or deny? this is really interesting news as it means basically everyone will get a job somewhere (even if not Oz) and can still apply for a pr.

  8. #8
    doctor_with_no_country is offline Junior Member
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    Don't know

    I heard somewhere that if you do internship in Singapore and return to NSW (Australian or foreigner), you must do another internship in NSW. And, you can't get out of the bloody "quota" system that way. Don't know about Malaysia or if the situation is different in other states.

    As for the large number of UK trained doctors working in Australia, I think, until quite recently (you had to have finished your degree before the end of 2003), there was fairly free movement of doctors throughout the Commonwealth. Just filled out the form, paid the fee, got registration, no tests.

    Many non-Commonwealth senior doctors get the AMC exam waived as do doctors who are willing to go into certain underserved areas.

    Anyway, it's Australia. Lots of "rules" are pretty loose, more like "guidelines". Problem is that it's hard to know what's what. For a lot of this immigration stuff, I think it's pretty arbitrary. When in doubt, fill out the form, write the check, send it in, and sit back and wait.

    You can also go for NZ residency (they need people bad) and then work in Australia. However, for internship allocation, NSW put international students ahead of Kiwis. I don't understand this as Australia and NZ are a free trade zone and there aren't supposed to be barriers to to the movement of labor.

    Doing 2 years of prevocational scut out in the sticks and not getting permanent residency would be such a waste.

    As for sponsorship rules, preferred occupations lists, etc, remember those change on a whim. Wouldn't make any plans more than a few months out based on any changes.

    As for Pediatrics, there are far fewer pediatricians here as well baby care and normal kiddie sickness are generally the domain of the GP. Pretty typical for the whole family to go to the same GP practice. Normal kids would probably never see a paediatrician. Smaller market.

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