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Asclepius1
02-12-2005, 07:19 PM
hi roxanta or anybody else
pl guide me
i need ur help
may u describe kaplan's chapter 4 about autonomic nervous system effect on cardiovascular system
in the last of the chapter it is written that control
after phenoxybanzamine
after propranolol
and graphs r here about cardiac activity
i am not understanding whgat is meant for?
regards

Asclepius1
02-12-2005, 07:25 PM
sorry i forgot
i need help in pharmacology's 4 chapter of kaplan
about ans drug effect on cvs
regards

Asclepius1
02-13-2005, 12:02 PM
According to the schedule (http://www.valuemd.com/calendar.php), we're not studying pharm until the third week of March, so we haven't discussed that chapter in the chats yet. But I'll give it a shot.

They are testing your knowledge of 2 things. First is if you know what receptors are effected by which drugs. Second is if you know what effects it will have. Given this info, you can determine which drug is the control by figuring out which receptors were effected.

Phenoxybenzamine is an alpha 1 and alpha 2 blocker. Propranolol is a beta 1 and beta 2 blocker. From the choices for controls, you have Epi (alpha 1, beta 1, beta 2 agonist), NE (alpha 1, Beta 1 agonist), phenyephrine (alpha 1), isoproterenol (beta 1, beta 2), terbutaline (beta 2).

If you give phenoxybenzamine and it changes the pattern of the control, then you know that the control has alpha 1 and/or alpha 2 activity. If you give propranolol and it changes the control activity, then you know that it has beta 1 and/or beta 2 activity. If either of these doesn't change the activity, then you know it doesn't have that particular receptor activity.

For example, if given a control and then you give phenoxybenzamine and no change, this tells you that there is no alpha activity in the control drug. If you then give propranolol and you see a change, this tells you that the control drug has beta activity. So ask yourself which drug has beta activity, but doesn't have any alpha activity. From the list of possible controls, only isoproterenol fits that description, so that would be the control in this example.

Hope this helps.







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