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MULstudent
01-31-2017, 07:16 AM
Current UMED student here.

After reading so many posts about this school (good or bad), living in Poland, and the different complaints, I feel the need to give my opinion on studying at this university and in general, ANY university abroad.

First I want to discuss the curriculum at this school. If your a student coming from North America, you will find that the curriculums here in Poland are not so similar to the ones in North America. Not to mention if you compare the 6MD program with the 4 year medical programs in North America, you better expect there to be several differences in the courses and the time allotted to the courses in these programs. Don't think you will get the same education in Poland as you would in the States for example. That being said, the medical Universities in Poland are directed to train people to be able to practice IN POLAND. THIS DOESN'T MEAN THAT YOU WOULDN'T HAVE THE ABILITY TO GO BACK HOME AND PRACTICE THERE. The university gives you the resources that you need in order to build a resume to go back to your country (eg. NBME exams, Steps, electives abroad), but they do not force this on their students, so it is up to the students to take the initiative themselves in their learning and direct themselves to their goal (whether it is to go back home or stay in Poland or in Europe etc). In fact, in the english division, most students are planning to return to their homes to practice and you will find the students that are serious about their post-graduate plans are taking the time and effort needed to reach their goals, and because of that effort, they end up reaching them. This is called "self-learning" and is a necessary skill to have in the field of medicine. Just remember, it is always recommended to study medicine in the country in which you wish to practice in. Do your research before attending a school, and don't expect to receive the same level of education anywhere for that matter.

TO ALL THOSE LOOKING TO STUDY MEDICINE:
As a student at this university (almost graduating), I've come to learn that I must take my education in my own hands. That means if I wish to change something, I do my best to get that done. If I wish to take my STEP 1 USMLE exam I'll put in the extra hours to study for it even if the curriculum isn't directed towards taking this exam. If I'm planning to return to North America, I'll put in the effort over the summer months to make connections and gain experience that would help better my resume. No matter which school you go to, if it is out of the country in which you wish to practice in, you must put in the effort to be competent enough to compete with those studying in that country (hope this makes sense). As a student here, I know what is coming for me when I apply back home. No matter what school I would have attended, I knew that I would have to do whatever it takes to make myself a competent candidate in the country I want to practice in. I know people who have attended this university and graduated, and are matched in the US and Canada. I know students who are practicing surgeons in Ireland and several doctors in the UK. I also know how hard working each one of those graduates are, and I know now what it takes to make it and I definitely know that it's possible.

I also want to address some of the posts that sound quite defaming to the Medical University of Lodz. Every university differs in how they teach, their teaching conditions, and their curriculum in general (from country to country). Don't just listen to rumours as those are easy to start and spread and are just that - rumours. Everyones experience in university is dependant on them and how they make of it. You can choose to come up with hundreds of reasons as to why you shouldn't have come here, or you can choose to look at why you decided to come here and what you can do to get out of here with what you want. If your not enjoying the experience here at the university, you are not forced to stay. If you find that going abroad was not the right decision for you, it's never to late to change your path, trust me. Medicine is a life-long career and if you don't put in the time to find out your path, you may find yourself regretting the field overall.

In the end I want to say that no matter what school you choose to attend abroad, just know that if you wish to practice at a prestigious hospital anywhere around the world (e.g US, Canada, UK,) you will have to go above and beyond what any university offers you in order to appear as a competent candidate. Do your research, choose a university that suits you, put in the time, put in the effort and you will be surprised what you can achieve no matter where you go. If you want it bad enough, you will get it.

Also, it is one thing to give facts about a university by stating your honest opinion and it is another thing to defame a university by repetitive posts that state rumours and untrue facts that are purely directed at discouraging people from attending this school. That doesn't help anyone, including yourself.

P.S. maybe the reason why you are not satisfied or are not going in the direction you want to go is because you spend so much time on forums trying to convince the internet not to attend this university??

medstudious
03-09-2017, 09:46 AM
Current UMED student here.

After reading so many posts about this school (good or bad), living in Poland, and the different complaints, I feel the need to give my opinion on studying at this university and in general, ANY university abroad.

First I want to discuss the curriculum at this school. If your a student coming from North America, you will find that the curriculums here in Poland are not so similar to the ones in North America. Not to mention if you compare the 6MD program with the 4 year medical programs in North America, you better expect there to be several differences in the courses and the time allotted to the courses in these programs. Don't think you will get the same education in Poland as you would in the States for example. That being said, the medical Universities in Poland are directed to train people to be able to practice IN POLAND.

Go back and reread this paragraph please. ^^^
Thank-you for stating this fact; I am glad that we are on the same page about this!



THIS DOESN'T MEAN THAT YOU WOULDN'T HAVE THE ABILITY TO GO BACK HOME AND PRACTICE THERE. The university gives you the resources that you need in order to build a resume to go back to your country (eg. NBME exams, Steps, electives abroad), but they do not force this on their students, so it is up to the students to take the initiative themselves in their learning and direct themselves to their goal (whether it is to go back home or stay in Poland or in Europe etc). In fact, in the english division, most students are planning to return to their homes to practice and you will find the students that are serious about their post-graduate plans are taking the time and effort needed to reach their goals, and because of that effort, they end up reaching them.



Great, so this is also correct, and I would like to propose a counterpoint, if I may.



Here's a scenario: Students entering a medical school in, say, England, Poland, USA or any other country are generally a group of students that were either born and raised or lived many years in said country, know the language extremely well, and MOST importantly, plan on practicing medicine in the country the med school in found in. Q: What does this entail? A: The fact that this group of students, as well as the teachers and professors can focus on the specific exams and information that is required by the med school, and strive to provide all the facts a physician would need to be a successful doctor in the given place. This group of individuals share common values, understand the laws and customs, understand the people, and to note, were accepted into the university because they met the requirements to be a physician that the schools and the country decided.


Visiting different countries is really a benefit, not a detriment, for students in most fields of study. I believe that med students should always seek opportunities to travel abroad and meet individuals around the world to broaden their knowledge about the diseases that affect individuals of different races and creeds, which strengthens their analytical skills and their ability to correctly diagnose rare and difficult pathologies. However, in order to acquire the correct skills and learn all the facts they need to succeed in preliminary exams, a med student needs stability and guidance and a strong network of colleagues, and not have to backpack across the world for a piece of paper.


Too much do international students in Poland suffer ambiguity of their known skills. There is constant contradicting and incorrect information, which is no ones fault but the situation itself, being that a Polish physician would normally not know factoids that are relevant for a student from the Middle or Far east, or for that matter the USA....
There really isnít any racism, believe me, so I resent anyone who suggests it. Itís just such a mess. Most students donít speak English, safe for the couple of Yankees or Brits who are less understood than individuals with heavy accents, teachers cannot answer questions related to USMLE Steps or the Canadian exams, or even the LEK, because SO few students do these exams AND teachers constantly ask the students to organize their own exam schedules, or the type of exams, which causes ENDLESS conflict.


The "idea" of international med schools is very new...Because maybe, just maybe,it really isn't a good idea..
Out of personal experience, in a class with 80% of students from the Middle or Far East, and less than 10% from N.America, the ability for any student,NO MATTER which country they are from, to focus their studying on any subject for ANY exam is made excruciatingly difficult. In all fairness, this is difficult for the teaching physician to focus their lectures and classes as well.


You might bethinking, "Just let the teacher teach by Polish standards,students do the rest." OK, this is by FAR easier said than done.Why? One, the teachers do genuinely try to accommodate to the students' needs and requirements. They try to ask about how "Thing are done in our respective countries" but please guys, this wastes SO MUCH TIME. It's like EVERY student at the school is an exchange student, except the reality is MOST students will NOT be able to "return to their home countries." If they are from Asia or the Middle East, they want to stay in Europe, but not Poland,so anything Polish related, they donít care. The EU students might be better off, but usually...they aren't good enough for their home country, so they want to go to the UK, or Ireland. Next, there are USA, Canada students. Canadian students are screwed, but they have a chance to dip to the USA, and USA students also want to return. However, these students vary based on ambition and work ethic; some of them plan to sneak into the UK, some into Ireland, some into..MALTA? for some reason..Some are studying for the STEPs, some are kind of studying for the STEPS but also might stay in Poland for a bit then go to UK then maybe back to USA...


...Are we starting to see a problem here??


Two, there is no focused curriculum, and saying that the standards are EU standards, I strongly disagree. What people need to understand is that UMED will not actually give you much in the direction of being a physician, even in to be a physician in Poland. The final exam for Polish med students is called the LEK, but this is NOT mandatory for the English students. The USA med exams, called STEPs, are also not mandatory..
Solution:Prepare English division students actively for the polish med exam(LEK), because students are not prep-ed for these AT ALL, nor for any other exam for any country!


The "melting-pot"of students is so new to polish universities, that it is still in development. Hey, for economics, history, humanities, this might be a great idea. People of different cultures sharing experience and ideas really helps develop certain values and ideas. For medicine? Not so much. This is actually what you bring up in the next point about"self-learning." There's an exam. You have to pass it. You have to sit down and study with a group of people who speak the language competently enough and are able to acquire the information at a certain speed. No frills. There is a deafening absence of this idea at UMED..
This might sound brutal, but it's true.


The experience that you have at medical school or ANY university is an important steppingstone, whether it affects your future career, or not at all. The attitude that most student have is that ď Iíll do my time here,get the diploma, then do with my life what I wish.Ē Ok, this isnít prison...You are supposed to grow and learn, not break rocks and just hope that your future might be slightly brighter once you leave.




This is called "self-learning" and is a necessary skill to have in the field of medicine. Just remember, it is always recommended to study medicine in the country in which you wish to practice in. Do your research before attending a school, and don't expect to receive the same level of education anywhere for that matter.

Yes..PLEASE



TO ALL THOSE LOOKING TO STUDY MEDICINE:
As a student at this university (almost graduating), I've come to learn that I must take my education in my own hands. That means if I wish to change something, I do my best to get that done. If I wish to take my STEP 1 USMLE exam I'll put in the extra hours to study for it even if the curriculum isn't directed towards taking this exam. If I'm planning to return to North America, I'll put in the effort over the summer months to make connections and gain experience that would help better my resume.

Yes, I agree.


No matter which school you go to, if it is out of the country in which you wish to practice in, you must put in the effort to be competent enough to compete with those studying in that country (hope this makes sense).

It does make sense..and also true.
Let me ask this however: If you are studying for Canadian or US exams in a foreign country, how do you know you are preparing correctly? How do you know what you are doing? How do you know what med school is in Canada or USA? Unless you know someone personally who attends med school in Canada or USA...Which seems like a bit of an "in" I'm afraid. Most people are not that fortunate.


As a student here, I know what is coming for me when I apply back home. No matter what school I would have attended, I knew that I would have to do whatever it takes to make myself a competent candidate in the country I want to practice in. I know people who have attended this university and graduated, and are matched in the US and Canada. I know students who are practicing surgeons in Ireland and several doctors in the UK. I also know how hard working each one of those graduates are, and I know now what it takes to make it and I definitely know that it's possible.

This is repeated ad nauseum. There is no proof of this on the University website, no alumni network. It's still all hearsay and "who-you-know".Look, Iíve heard things also, but no idea if I should believe it or not.




I also want to address some of the posts that sound quite defaming to the Medical University of Lodz. Every university differs in how they teach, their teaching conditions, and their curriculum in general (from country to country). Don't just listen to rumours as those are easy to start and spread and are just that - rumours. Everyones experience in university is dependant on them and how they make of it.

Or opinions. Every person is entitled to their opinion on how they envision(ed) the university they attend and the impression they got from their experiences. Trust me, find me an excellent school in USA/Canada and I will find someone who will b**** and complain about their terrible experiences. Sometimes it's the country, sometimes the people,sometimes the curriculum, sometimes just what is going on in these people's heads. This is the reality that every uni on the planet has to face, especially if you want to call yourself ďinternational.ĒCriticism is good, trust me.
Solution:find some real positive opinions on this school, and PROOF of the success of the students and their research..




You can choose to come up with hundreds of reasons as to why you shouldn't have come here, or you can choose to look at why you decided to come here and what you can do to get out of here with what you want. If your not enjoying the experience here at the university, you are not forced to stay. If you find that going abroad was not the right decision for you, it's never to late to change your path, trust me. Medicine is a life-long career and if you don't put in the time to find out your path, you may find yourself regretting the field overall.

In the end I want to say that no matter what school you choose to attend abroad, just know that if you wish to practice at a prestigious hospital anywhere around the world (e.g US, Canada, UK,) you will have to go above and beyond what any university offers you in order to appear as a competent candidate. Do your research, choose a university that suits you, put in the time, put in the effort and you will be surprised what you can achieve no matter where you go. If you want it bad enough, you will get it.

Also, it is one thing to give facts about a university by stating your honest opinion and it is another thing to defame a university by repetitive posts that state rumours and untrue facts that are purely directed at discouraging people from attending this school. That doesn't help anyone, including yourself.




I don't doubt that at all. If individuals want to attend any school in the galaxy they should absolutely do that if they wish, and then do with their life what they want. I think it's just a TINY bit naive to think that the school which you attended makes NO difference in your future. I understand that grit and ruthless ambition can get you places one cannot even fathom, but I seriously don't believe that that is the life people envision for themselves, especially at UMED. Most of these types of individuals tend to not attend E-EU med schools...There's a few "head-scratching" cases here, mostly in the 4-year program, and I say good-luck to them!







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