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View Full Version : Number of AUA students sitting for the USMLE (STEP 1)



Quartz
12-09-2014, 08:06 AM
I was wondering how large are AUA class in general and how many people end up sitting for the USMLE? I want to get an idea of the percentage of students that successfully make it to rotations and match. I would appreciate any input from current and former AUA students.

Kyle_
01-11-2015, 04:20 PM
Yes I would really like to know this as well as the cumulative and science GPA for an entering class (Feb '15). I can't find this information anywhere, please help.

HOPEMDOne
01-18-2015, 05:45 PM
i am thinking of wither AUA or MUA which one is better?

DoctaDocta
04-08-2015, 12:30 AM
People drop like flies in the basic science years. The percentage that make it to step1 is irrelevant. Many ppl have the attitude that since it was easy to get in, it will be easy to pass. But remember AUA is a med school like any other. You have to learn the same material as any US school. Most of the faculty at AUA are amazing. Some not so much (self-studying will be needed from time to time). If you're focused and work hard from day 1 you will make it thru. If u come here to party and socialize and live the college lifestyle, you will join the flies. Very simple. Bottom line is that the successful students are the ones who worked hard.
My med1 class was about 200 students. Now, 2 semesters later we have about 125. Probably will be less and less as we move forward. But again just gotta keep your head down and WORK. Check out the residency matches on AUA website. Those are 100% real. We have alumni visit the island all the time. There's no false info in those lists. If they can do it so can you.

Raj25
04-08-2015, 11:21 AM
How many actually match in a categorical position vs preliminary spot? Matching in prelim means nothing. Many of those stats are from prelim matches which basically means you are red flagged due to the school attended, poor stats, bad clerkship letters etc. practising in states is iffy. only a handful get categorical Match. They actually end up practising.

DoctaDocta
04-08-2015, 04:25 PM
Since when does prelim mean the schools been red flagged or you have poor stats? Prelim positions are competitive. If you had poor stats you wouldnt match into anything let alone prelim. Also, a lot of specialties (rads, neurology, anesthesiology, etc.) REQUIRE you to do a prelim year before starting. These are PGY2 positions. You cant enter directly into rads after graduating. Do your homework before spreading poor information ***. Prelim positions are obtained thru the match just like every other position and most ppl in prelim programs are going to start a PGY2 program the following year. Some people do use it as a backup to kill one year if they didnt get into the specialty of their choice. But again, poor stats = prelim? Show me some evidence for anything youve written in the above post and then maybe we can continue this conversation.

Raj25
04-09-2015, 08:10 AM
https://residency.wustl.edu/Residencies/Pages/CategoricalvsPreliminary.aspx

You are sounding as though AUA churns out Ben Carsons every graduation ceremony. Maybe you have trouble understanding English. Prelim positions for US grads are prereqs for specialties you've mentioned like neurology. You are assuming that AUA students who match into prelim programs for anaesthesiology, neutology etc i.e they scored >245 on step1, aced clinicals and had no hitches during clerkships where AUA students have to compete against SGU and Ross students who are superior academically for the simple reason AUA doesn't need an undergrad degree or mcat for admissions.

Will you please explain what happens to the majority of prelim matches from AUA for non specialties and FM that are under funded and overly competitive for categorical spots from oversees grads?

DoctaDocta
04-11-2015, 02:09 PM
LOL. MCAT means nothing. If an AUA grad beats an SGU or Ross grad on their Steps, then what makes them inferior? Don't act like just because they require an MCAT at SGU that the students there are suddenly smarter. At the end of the day it's up to the individual and that was my point to begin with. I've seen "smart" kids with degrees from amazing universities and a ton of publications get destroyed at AUA b/c they don't take it seriously. Also seen kids with non-science degrees who just decided on medicine as a career at a late time doing absolutely amazing. It does not matter what school you go to (as long as they are properly accredited, which AUA is). How do you think a student from the FIRST class of AUA landed a residency in NEUROSURGERY at BROWN?! What reputation did AUA have at that point? Nothing. You think he was academically inferior to SGU grads? Maybe AUA just dressed some random guy off the street as a doctor and made him pose with a model brain for pictures and it's all a big lie? Gimme a break. We've had amazing matches in specialties like neurosurg, plastic surgery, radiology, etc. Also prestigious hospitals like Brown, and Mayo clinic. Again up to the individual. I've spoken to some of these alumni myself, they visit the school every once in a while for Q and A sessions. The opportunities are there and If you want it bad enough, you can get it. Going to SGU or Ross vs. AUA makes no difference.

Back to the OP, don't worry about what percentage makes it to Step 1, etc. If you come to the Caribbean (any school), don't plan on being an average student because that won't get you anywhere. If you work hard and perform well, the doors are open for you on the residency side. AUA, like all Carib schools, are easy to get in but hard to get out, because remember this is MEDICAL SCHOOL. You write the same board exams as kids from Harvard Med. So you better be prepared to work hard to reach their level of understanding of the material if you want to compete with US grads for residency positions. That is the bottom line and the truth.

When deciding on which school to choose, I'd focus on cost, accreditation, and get some input from current/former students as to how well the school teaches vs. how much self-study you have to do (btw, AUA has amazing faculty and they teach you very well. Every once in a while you get a sub-par prof and you have to really go and learn on your own, but majority are fantastic). Also keep in mind that going to any international school is a risk. No one knows what the future holds in terms of number of residency positions and number of US grads, new legislations, etc. Med school takes 4 years so a lot can change from the time you enter to the time you finish. Always try your absolute hardest to get into a US MD or even DO school first before coming to the Caribbean.

Raj25
04-12-2015, 04:45 PM
LOL. MCAT means nothing. If an AUA grad beats an SGU or Ross grad on their Steps, then what makes them inferior? Don't act like just because they require an MCAT at SGU that the students there are suddenly smarter. At the end of the day it's up to the individual and that was my point to begin with. I've seen "smart" kids with degrees from amazing universities and a ton of publications get destroyed at AUA b/c they don't take it seriously. Also seen kids with non-science degrees who just decided on medicine as a career at a late time doing absolutely amazing. It does not matter what school you go to (as long as they are properly accredited, which AUA is). How do you think a student from the FIRST class of AUA landed a residency in NEUROSURGERY at BROWN?! What reputation did AUA have at that point? Nothing. You think he was academically inferior to SGU grads? Maybe AUA just dressed some random guy off the street as a doctor and made him pose with a model brain for pictures and it's all a big lie? Gimme a break. We've had amazing matches in specialties like neurosurg, plastic surgery, radiology, etc. Also prestigious hospitals like Brown, and Mayo clinic. Again up to the individual. I've spoken to some of these alumni myself, they visit the school every once in a while for Q and A sessions. The opportunities are there and If you want it bad enough, you can get it. Going to SGU or Ross vs. AUA makes no difference.

Back to the OP, don't worry about what percentage makes it to Step 1, etc. If you come to the Caribbean (any school), don't plan on being an average student because that won't get you anywhere. If you work hard and perform well, the doors are open for you on the residency side. AUA, like all Carib schools, are easy to get in but hard to get out, because remember this is MEDICAL SCHOOL. You write the same board exams as kids from Harvard Med. So you better be prepared to work hard to reach their level of understanding of the material if you want to compete with US grads for residency positions. That is the bottom line and the truth.

When deciding on which school to choose, I'd focus on cost, accreditation, and get some input from current/former students as to how well the school teaches vs. how much self-study you have to do (btw, AUA has amazing faculty and they teach you very well. Every once in a while you get a sub-par prof and you have to really go and learn on your own, but majority are fantastic). Also keep in mind that going to any international school is a risk. No one knows what the future holds in terms of number of residency positions and number of US grads, new legislations, etc. Med school takes 4 years so a lot can change from the time you enter to the time you finish. Always try your absolute hardest to get into a US MD or even DO school first before coming to the Caribbean.


I agree with a lot you said about the onus being entirely on the student.

and AUA profs are amazing? First time hearing it.

DoctaDocta
04-12-2015, 05:29 PM
A lot has changed, especially in the last year with the new executive dean taking over. Faculty are being replaced all the time, and we also have many guest lecturers who come in. In first semester alone we had a professor from Yale and a professor from Stanford come and teach us certain topics. The chief editor of Netter's anatomy regularly comes and teaches first years anatomy. We even had a Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Harald zur Hausen (discovered the link between HPV and cervical cancer leading to development of the HPV vaccine) come and present his current research at AUA's research day and some students got to go and have breakfast with him and chat. AUA definitely has turned things around. I've heard some of the crazy stories from the past few years, but trust me it's changed dramatically and I am enjoying my experience 100%.

AUA hasn't been around as long as the "Top 4" or whatever Caribbean schools, and we've had some bad incidences in the past, so I understand the concerns, but I think it is a hidden gem now. Admissions are still more slack than say SGU or Ross, but that doesn't mean anything because you still have to pass the NBME comp to be eligible to move to Step 1 and beyond, so anyone who does work hard and make it to that point has proved themselves academically and are essentially on equal ground as the other students. I heard from an AUA alumni who is now doing a fellowship at Yale (!) that programs that do take IMG's don't really care that you're a Caribbean grad as long as your USMLE scores are competitive. The stigma only remains on those who barely pass their Steps or take multiple attempts or fail a semester, etc. You should have a spotless track record from first semester to last semester. And also, he told me that once you complete residency in the US, you are considered equal to US grads.. Hence how he got accepted into Yale for his fellowship studies. (Matched at a good hospital, became chief resident, got board certified and now is at Yale for fellowship). It's all hard work, people!!!!!

Perhaps I'm biased since I go to AUA, but either way I don't regret it at all. And yes, success is all in the student's hands at the end of the day.

Sorry for the long rants, but I've seen so much negativity on these forums so I wanted to share some positive vibes!

Confused14
04-12-2015, 06:08 PM
A lot has changed, especially in the last year with the new executive dean taking over. Faculty are being replaced all the time, and we also have many guest lecturers who come in. In first semester alone we had a professor from Yale and a professor from Stanford come and teach us certain topics. The chief editor of Netter's anatomy regularly comes and teaches first years anatomy. We even had a Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Harald zur Hausen (discovered the link between HPV and cervical cancer leading to development of the HPV vaccine) come and present his current research at AUA's research day and some students got to go and have breakfast with him and chat. AUA definitely has turned things around. I've heard some of the crazy stories from the past few years, but trust me it's changed dramatically and I am enjoying my experience 100%.

AUA hasn't been around as long as the "Top 4" or whatever Caribbean schools, and we've had some bad incidences in the past, so I understand the concerns, but I think it is a hidden gem now. Admissions are still more slack than say SGU or Ross, but that doesn't mean anything because you still have to pass the NBME comp to be eligible to move to Step 1 and beyond, so anyone who does work hard and make it to that point has proved themselves academically and are essentially on equal ground as the other students. I heard from an AUA alumni who is now doing a fellowship at Yale (!) that programs that do take IMG's don't really care that you're a Caribbean grad as long as your USMLE scores are competitive. The stigma only remains on those who barely pass their Steps or take multiple attempts or fail a semester, etc. You should have a spotless track record from first semester to last semester. And also, he told me that once you complete residency in the US, you are considered equal to US grads.. Hence how he got accepted into Yale for his fellowship studies. (Matched at a good hospital, became chief resident, got board certified and now is at Yale for fellowship). It's all hard work, people!!!!!

Perhaps I'm biased since I go to AUA, but either way I don't regret it at all. And yes, success is all in the student's hands at the end of the day.

Sorry for the long rants, but I've seen so much negativity on these forums so I wanted to share some positive vibes!


I agree it's getting better, and the outcome is based on the student's effort. Does AUA give u everything? I would say no, a lot of passing step 1 is purely self study. The problem is that most of the professors at AUA haven't taken the Step exams and therefore don't know how teach it. I am an AUA clinical student, but we should be realistic to potential applicants. Retake Mcat/ try DO before coming (like was stated above), if all else fails, try AUA.

What percentage of material does AUA expose its students related to step 1? I honestly would say 65-70%. They focus more memorization than test taking strategies. The in house exams are way too easy, based on buzz words (nowhere as difficult to STEP1). I knew students getting honors and failed Step.

The school is a business, and if you are not willing to work, you will fail. You need to have this in your head from day 1. If you work hard (not just "say" you will), you will succeed and match. If you are stuggling in a subject or a concept, get help and don't wait until the end or you will fail. I'm proud of AUA, they are investing properly for our future (at least for clinical sciences).

Raj25
04-13-2015, 03:37 PM
Nice to hear. Haven't heard anything about changes made since the infamous comp shelf incident.

summer_forever
08-01-2015, 11:41 AM
Hey! I'm seriously considering AUA at the moment, but I'm hesitant because of all the negative things I've read online about the school ( Cheating scandal, issues with clinicals) DoctaDocta Your probably the first person Ive come across to be so clear and honest about the school. If AUA isn't the best at preparing you for the USMLE step 1,is it possible to take the kaplan prep course for the USMLE step 1 while your on break or something? Im also concerned about the total cost of attending AUA ? And are they efficient at organizing rotations? Ive heard horror stories about students getting delayed.

subscapularis
08-10-2015, 03:22 PM
My cousin went to AUA and left the island in 2010, I left the island in 2014 and our views of the school are very different. We both did well and passed the comp, step 1 etc! He is now in residency.
The school is good, but you have to work your gluteus off so you can pass the classes! whatever school you choose there will always be some bad eggs/apples/oranges but you got to do you! Medical school is a struggle, AUA prepared me gave me the material, I could have worked harder though and then I think I would have passed step 1 earlier than I did!!

DoctaDocta
09-24-2015, 04:41 PM
Cheating scandals,etc. are old news. Dr. Mallin's administration is a lot better than the previous one (from what I've heard). Not in clinicals yet so can't comment on that, but so far I feel like the education has been good (some GREAT profs, some not so great). I'll comment further on Step 1 after I take it sometime in 2016..

Alutaa
11-24-2015, 06:32 AM
Hi DoctaDocta, please, I need your Med 1 AUA class schedule and if possible your syllabus indicating what pages to study from the text books and so on. I will be starting in February 2016 and I want to familiarize myself with some of the materials. Thank you in advance for your anticipated reply.

gasdogg1
12-04-2015, 12:16 PM
Hey I am starting in February 2016 also. If you get ahold of that information can you forward it to me at [email protected]







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