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geronimoalltheway
07-23-2014, 06:59 AM
I don't know what to expect. Can anyone shed some light on what to expect and how to prepare for this upcoming year? Maybe something that you wish you had done prior to starting or things you recommend against?

thxleave
07-24-2014, 03:32 PM
I actually want to know this too. I know I'm going to buy comfortable shoes such as Sanita or Merell for the rotations. Otherwise I don't know what else.

I know buy a short white coat. I remember someone on FB complained about they didn't know, and brought the school white coat and felt embarrassed (which is kinda his fault though, since I know OCG mentioned this once or twice).

thxleave
07-24-2014, 05:45 PM
I think I'll probably get Firecracker, and just add the decks before each rotation. So that way I won't sound like an idiot if I get asked questions.

ThatVietGuy
07-24-2014, 05:48 PM
Surprise! You're going to sound like an idiot no matter what question is asked. You'll always get pimped on something incredibly random not covered by study materials.

Just take it easy before everything starts and make sure your finances/apartment/whatever else is squared away. The only thing you can do is keep a smile on your face, always be eager to do anything, and keep working hard.

Salama
07-24-2014, 06:07 PM
This is all very hospital dependent as some hospitals have week long orientations and others have none, but here are some of the big things:

1. Dress professionally unless specifically told that you can wear scrubs/business casual. This includes a tie for guys (some people don't think it's a huge deal but if your attending is one of those tie guys, you will the guy that didn't wear a tie and then you will be that and only that for the rest of the rotation) girls no open-toed shoes or mini skirts (be practical, you might have to squat down low to examine a pt). Other snafus include low cut or sleeveless shirts.

2. Always be early. Some rotations have a mantra of if you are early you are on time, if you are on time you are late. Impress, impress, impress. The effort will be noted.

3. Hone your interview and physical exam skills. This will happen during rotations, but you should know the basics. With each differential, you will pick up what the pertinent positives and negatives are.

4. Always ask if you can do something. In the ED, does the pt need an IV? Ask the nurse if you can try. Same with NG tubes, etc. I know someone who put in an IO bc they asked and there was no resident around. (Tip: if you know you will be going to a surgery or doing a procedure the day before or even a few hours prior, watch a youtube video on it and know what you are going to do. I did a basic surgery by myself as a MS3 bc I watched the video on how to do it the night before.)

5. In each core, be open to what you are learning. If you are absolutely going to be a surgeon, don't write off Psych. You will have pts with psychologic afflictions. This is medicine, you need to know a bit of all of it. You also never know what it is that is going to strike you.

6. Do the UWorld questions for each core during the core. It's required by the school, or was, and it will help immensely on your Shelf.

7. Every time you get an interesting case, go read about it. Those will be the ones that stick in your head.

8. There is more stuff that I can't access right now. It's in my brain, but I don't have the capacity to access it. Will update when energy restored.

geronimoalltheway
07-24-2014, 10:06 PM
Thank you, this is already so helpful! But yes, keep the tips coming.

Mind if I ask what basic surgery it was you did via youtube?

zara1200
07-25-2014, 12:25 AM
You should repeat old syllabus.

thxleave
07-25-2014, 12:50 AM
This is all very hospital dependent as some hospitals have week long orientations and others have none, but here are some of the big things:

1. Dress professionally unless specifically told that you can wear scrubs/business casual. This includes a tie for guys (some people don't think it's a huge deal but if your attending is one of those tie guys, you will the guy that didn't wear a tie and then you will be that and only that for the rest of the rotation) girls no open-toed shoes or mini skirts (be practical, you might have to squat down low to examine a pt). Other snafus include low cut or sleeveless shirts.

2. Always be early. Some rotations have a mantra of if you are early you are on time, if you are on time you are late. Impress, impress, impress. The effort will be noted.

3. Hone your interview and physical exam skills. This will happen during rotations, but you should know the basics. With each differential, you will pick up what the pertinent positives and negatives are.

4. Always ask if you can do something. In the ED, does the pt need an IV? Ask the nurse if you can try. Same with NG tubes, etc. I know someone who put in an IO bc they asked and there was no resident around. (Tip: if you know you will be going to a surgery or doing a procedure the day before or even a few hours prior, watch a youtube video on it and know what you are going to do. I did a basic surgery by myself as a MS3 bc I watched the video on how to do it the night before.)

5. In each core, be open to what you are learning. If you are absolutely going to be a surgeon, don't write off Psych. You will have pts with psychologic afflictions. This is medicine, you need to know a bit of all of it. You also never know what it is that is going to strike you.

6. Do the UWorld questions for each core during the core. It's required by the school, or was, and it will help immensely on your Shelf.

7. Every time you get an interesting case, go read about it. Those will be the ones that stick in your head.

8. There is more stuff that I can't access right now. It's in my brain, but I don't have the capacity to access it. Will update when energy restored.

I lucked out on ties. Went to Marshalls and got 10 ties stored in a Ziploc bag from last year. Normally would set me back like $200, but got them at like $7 each. Life is good.

Prash P
07-26-2014, 04:58 PM
Go into 3rd year thinking I need to be able to do this.

Go into 4th year thinking, can I do this on my own on call at 3am?

thxleave
07-29-2014, 11:50 AM
I heard some people in rotations recommend you do a CPR refresher course. Do you think it's worth it?

I don't mind the time and cost, but just want to know will I look less incompetent if I did it? I know in 5th term you had to do one, but I heard at hospital you are expected to really know it.

Thanks guys/sal for everything!

Salama
07-29-2014, 08:31 PM
I heard some people in rotations recommend you do a CPR refresher course. Do you think it's worth it?

I don't mind the time and cost, but just want to know will I look less incompetent if I did it? I know in 5th term you had to do one, but I heard at hospital you are expected to really know it.

Thanks guys/sal for everything!
Nah. You will never be running a code. All I ever did was compressions and they will yell at you if you don't crack the ribs, so you will learn what to do quickly. A dummy can't teach you that feeling.

Dr. Fatalis
07-30-2014, 09:44 PM
This is all very hospital dependent as some hospitals have week long orientations and others have none, but here are some of the big things:

1. Dress professionally unless specifically told that you can wear scrubs/business casual. This includes a tie for guys (some people don't think it's a huge deal but if your attending is one of those tie guys, you will the guy that didn't wear a tie and then you will be that and only that for the rest of the rotation) girls no open-toed shoes or mini skirts (be practical, you might have to squat down low to examine a pt). Other snafus include low cut or sleeveless shirts.

2. Always be early. Some rotations have a mantra of if you are early you are on time, if you are on time you are late. Impress, impress, impress. The effort will be noted.

3. Hone your interview and physical exam skills. This will happen during rotations, but you should know the basics. With each differential, you will pick up what the pertinent positives and negatives are.

4. Always ask if you can do something. In the ED, does the pt need an IV? Ask the nurse if you can try. Same with NG tubes, etc. I know someone who put in an IO bc they asked and there was no resident around. (Tip: if you know you will be going to a surgery or doing a procedure the day before or even a few hours prior, watch a youtube video on it and know what you are going to do. I did a basic surgery by myself as a MS3 bc I watched the video on how to do it the night before.)

5. In each core, be open to what you are learning. If you are absolutely going to be a surgeon, don't write off Psych. You will have pts with psychologic afflictions. This is medicine, you need to know a bit of all of it. You also never know what it is that is going to strike you.

6. Do the UWorld questions for each core during the core. It's required by the school, or was, and it will help immensely on your Shelf.

7. Every time you get an interesting case, go read about it. Those will be the ones that stick in your head.

8. There is more stuff that I can't access right now. It's in my brain, but I don't have the capacity to access it. Will update when energy restored.

This is essentially all you need to know but ill add my 2cents
1- I cant stress about being ON TIME! You will still be surprised that people show up 30min,1hr, 1.5hrs late with no excuse and act like nothing is wrong
2- don't go overboard with studying on day 1; find a good resident/attending to show you the ropes and to teach. I can't tell you how many times an attending told me something and it showed up on uworld/ pre-test. They are board cert. for a reason.
3- people won't like you, get used it it! But still work hard so it becomes hard for them not to like you.
4- as sal said, being early is on time and being on time is late!
5- forget about "I heard...." ,everyone's experience is different. Yes, a rotation can be "easy" or "laid back". You can also ask if you can help in some way, 9/10 they will give you some stuff to do. Remember, you are there to work, you are on there time and you are helping out, if you want to go home....just don't bother showing up.
6- downtime= cracking open a review book. The staff notices who just hangs around, on their phone and who actively studies.

Crispy
07-31-2014, 09:28 AM
Iron your clothes. Do not be the student who always has wrinkled clothes. Wear comfortable shoes. You will be on your feet a lot.
If your resident tells you to go home, go home. Don't say I'll stay in case you need help. There is probably nothing going on and the resident would like to use that time to catch up on charts/dictations. Be available but not annoying. Do not try to correct residents in front of the attending. If the resident is incorrect, the attending or another resident will correct them. If it is just the 2 of you discussing a case, then you can say something like "I think it is acutally....." or "I remember reading this." Do not throw your fellow students under the bus.

Andrew21
07-31-2014, 06:32 PM
I have to completely agree with Salama's list, especially 5 (not just because I'm psych). You don't need to lie to your team and tell them you want to practice whatever field you happen to be rotating in, but being disinterested, aloof, or even demeaning to the service will be picked up on quickly. Departments can and do communicate, and as IMGs, we need to treat every rotation like an audition. Be yourself, have fun, build up other members in your team.

rokshana
07-31-2014, 06:50 PM
absolutely THIS…

Iron your clothes. Do not be the student who always has wrinkled clothes. Wear comfortable shoes. You will be on your feet a lot.
If your resident tells you to go home, go home. Don't say I'll stay in case you need help. There is probably nothing going on and the resident would like to use that time to catch up on charts/dictations. Be available but not annoying. Do not try to correct residents in front of the attending. If the resident is incorrect, the attending or another resident will correct them. If it is just the 2 of you discussing a case, then you can say something like "I think it is acutally....." or "I remember reading this." Do not throw your fellow students under the bus.

and NEVER EVER LIE…if you didn't do something…see a pt, get a lab or a vital, say you didn't…get caught in a lie and you are DONE!

geronimoalltheway
08-18-2014, 06:08 PM
Any recommends on which review books are key?

ThatVietGuy
08-19-2014, 06:34 PM
Step Up to Medicine for Medicine
NMS Surgery (if you're really into surgery) or NMS Casebook (if you just want to pass the shelf)
Case Files for Peds
Blueprints for Ob/Gyn
First Aid Step 1 for Psych

thxleave
10-01-2014, 06:28 PM
This is all very hospital dependent as some hospitals have week long orientations and others have none, but here are some of the big things:

1. Dress professionally unless specifically told that you can wear scrubs/business casual. This includes a tie for guys (some people don't think it's a huge deal but if your attending is one of those tie guys, you will the guy that didn't wear a tie and then you will be that and only that for the rest of the rotation) girls no open-toed shoes or mini skirts (be practical, you might have to squat down low to examine a pt). Other snafus include low cut or sleeveless shirts.

2. Always be early. Some rotations have a mantra of if you are early you are on time, if you are on time you are late. Impress, impress, impress. The effort will be noted.

3. Hone your interview and physical exam skills. This will happen during rotations, but you should know the basics. With each differential, you will pick up what the pertinent positives and negatives are.

4. Always ask if you can do something. In the ED, does the pt need an IV? Ask the nurse if you can try. Same with NG tubes, etc. I know someone who put in an IO bc they asked and there was no resident around. (Tip: if you know you will be going to a surgery or doing a procedure the day before or even a few hours prior, watch a youtube video on it and know what you are going to do. I did a basic surgery by myself as a MS3 bc I watched the video on how to do it the night before.)

5. In each core, be open to what you are learning. If you are absolutely going to be a surgeon, don't write off Psych. You will have pts with psychologic afflictions. This is medicine, you need to know a bit of all of it. You also never know what it is that is going to strike you.

6. Do the UWorld questions for each core during the core. It's required by the school, or was, and it will help immensely on your Shelf.

7. Every time you get an interesting case, go read about it. Those will be the ones that stick in your head.

8. There is more stuff that I can't access right now. It's in my brain, but I don't have the capacity to access it. Will update when energy restored.

bump, because this advice makes me look less like an idiot in OR.....meaning attending let you do more stuff..... highly recommend this

Crispy
10-01-2014, 08:05 PM
absolutely THIS…


and NEVER EVER LIE…if you didn't do something…see a pt, get a lab or a vital, say you didn't…get caught in a lie and you are DONE!

I second this as well!

eastcoast
10-11-2014, 09:20 AM
Agree with Salama, Dr. Crispy and Rokshana. Good advice like always.

My advice
1. Don't skip things just because you heard other students got away with it successfully. This means - don't sign in to a lecture then leave for lunch, don't lie to chief residents about being on call the night before so you're exempt from an upcoming call, don't leave early just because there's nothing to do. This sort of stuff happened during my core rotations and people DID get in trouble for it.

2. If you are on a shift schedule, and you get told to do an admission 5 minutes before your shift ends, don't complain. Yes it sucks and they should probably hand it off to the next-on-call but if you complain you will look ungrateful and petty.

3. ALWAYS maintain HIPPA laws. First of all, learn what they are. Learn when you can break confidentiality and when you can't (especially during your psych rotation). Be especially careful with this because I'm sure in your excitement you will want to discuss interesting cases with family, friends, fellow students. Don't discuss patient info in public places like cafeterias, elevators, the subway, etc. If you have printed material with patient info on it, be mindful of where you keep it when you are out in public or at the hospital. In the hopsital alone, it is a $10,000 Joint Commission violation for each sheet of paper with patient info on it that is found in a public location. If you want save images of interesting Xrays, CTs, etc ASK what the policy is first in your hospital. Most hospitals will be okay with you screen-shotting something as long as you crop out any identifying data.
I did hear a story about another Carib student at my hospital who took a picture of a teenager that was intubated with head injuries in the ICU. I also heard another story about a student who took photos of a woman who went into labor in the hospital. Both of these students got in serious trouble for it. So just don't do anything stupid like this.

laricb
10-11-2014, 12:37 PM
I don't know what to expect. Can anyone shed some light on what to expect and how to prepare for this upcoming year? Maybe something that you wish you had done prior to starting or things you recommend against?mistaken post

lonepair
04-02-2015, 08:10 AM
I'm starting 3rd year rotations in a few weeks so that's why I'm bumping up this thread.

Any additional advice or experience anyone want to share? Thanks!

Frostling
04-02-2015, 01:23 PM
I'm starting 3rd year rotations in a few weeks so that's why I'm bumping up this thread.

Any additional advice or experience anyone want to share? Thanks!

Everything here is pretty spot on. If you know where you will be doing rotations we may be able to help with specifics.

lonepair
04-02-2015, 01:32 PM
I'll find out on April 17th where I'll be placed. Really excited.

Frostling
04-02-2015, 01:35 PM
I'll find out on April 17th where I'll be placed. Really excited.

Hope you get placed at your top pick. We can probably give you more focused advice once you know where you're going.

lonepair
04-02-2015, 02:35 PM
Sounds good. Thanks.

thxleave
04-03-2015, 07:37 PM
Things I learned I feel are universal:

1) You think they don't know your name, but they do.
2) You get credit when they see it. What do they see a lot? H&P and presentations. You look like a boss if you can do A&P part of H&P. Know lame shit they gonna ask that is going to be out of your scope for shelf or step 2ck. Alcoholic? CIWA. Acute pancreatitis? Ranson, if they gonna bust what about APACHE-II? I be like... yo patient isn't going to ICU.
3) Be a team player, but don't stay too quiet to point where you can't shine. A few times attending ask a question to everyone residents+students.... I knew answer I stayed quiet, cuzz didn't want to upshow residents. I looked bad during that rotation. I don't do that anymore, I still respect totem pole though. When they ask residents directly, stay quiet unless they ask you directly or open question up.
4) H&P so important it's ridiculous, and presentation, I'ma list again.
5) When you told to leave, just do it. They know what time you show up though. So if rounds is at 8AM, and you show up at 730AM they gonna know somehow.
6) Some of the medical assistants will grade you, cuzz attending and resident will just shove the grades to them.
7) Keep your team patient list updated. So when you hear rounds so and so will go for a EGD. Check on that stuff later, and mention it to resident. Be like yo... I saw patient EGD, and it was negative or positive for this.
8) Just learn what CBC, BMP, and trough levels do. So on.....
9) Don't complain ever in front of residents and interns
10) Don't have to lie and say you want to do this, but show enthusiasm to learn in all your rotations.

Dr. Fatalis
04-05-2015, 11:58 AM
10) Don't have to lie and say you want to do this, but show enthusiasm to learn in all your rotations.

Sometimes this is easier said than done! lol
I agree with what thxleave said tho. Take third year one day at a time, take it seriously but remember that you are learning and have a very small role in patient care [ie on the team].

Zeppelin87
04-07-2015, 11:01 PM
Advice I'd give now looking back at the last 2 years (This is not academic stuff, just general stuff)

1) Your goal by the end of your 3rd year is to be able to take a wicked history and physical and be able to relay this information to others well. This only comes with practice. You will get faster, more concise, and more detailed and improve drastically but repetition is key. This is something that regardless of what you want to do will be essential. This is also the easiest way to tell a new 3rd year student from a MSIV or resident. The faster you master this the better.

2) Be professional at all times. Obviously be yourself, but remember in the hospital you are wearing a white coat, which means you are a doctor.

3) Friendliness and being a team player goes way further in the eyes of residents and attendings than being the smartest person on the team.

4) Don't be a gunner. Study hard and work hard, but let others shine when they have the chance to and never bad mouth a fellow student or a resident.

5) Showing up early is great, staying late is nice but just listen to your residents. Its okay to be interested without being overbearing. Some residents feel that if a student is with them they have to teach or they get side tracked. Respect their wishes.

6) Get the most out of the rotations you hate, because depending on your specialty choice you may never be able to do it again (delivering a baby, assisting in a surgery)

7) Pace yourself, rotations like medicine and surgery are really long.

8) Don't let people bother you and learn to work well with the people you work with. This will make your life easier.

Finally, agreeing with what someone said never ever ever lie. If you didn't check the patient's extremities you can't guess whether they had edema or not. Don't guess lab values, write them down. You will get caught and more importantly the patient will suffer. This holds true both in the hospital and even on the CS, never ever lie. Better to learn from your mistake in the long run and after seeing resident blunders left and right, you will realize it's normal and that everyone is learning.

Craigslist
04-08-2015, 09:54 PM
Do they drug test for clinicals?

rokshana
04-09-2015, 08:55 AM
Do they drug test for clinicals?
some do some don't...its hospital specific.

lonepair
04-11-2015, 10:55 AM
Do we get told the entire 3rd year schedule at one time or does the info come one rotation at a time every few months?

ThatVietGuy
04-11-2015, 02:31 PM
You'll get told where you're going first but the schedule will show up on Self-Service at some point. That's how it was when I started a couple years ago, but it could be more efficient now.

Craigslist
04-19-2015, 09:38 PM
Exciting to get our Placements. Got my second choice, but secretly it was my first choice. Some people complaining and wanting to trade spots on FB, sounds like thats to be expected.

Dr. Fatalis
04-21-2015, 07:48 AM
Some people complaining and wanting to trade spots on FB, sounds like thats to be expected.

that is the usual around this time lol
PM me if you have any questions!

LordFlorianGeyer
06-23-2015, 11:59 AM
Is it difficult to get a clinical rotation in NYC if you're a NYC resident?

Dr. Fatalis
06-23-2015, 12:39 PM
Is it difficult to get a clinical rotation in NYC if you're a NYC resident?
not a problem at all. In term 5 you do a preference list by state and the school is very good at giving you your top pick and more so if you live in a certain area.

Kongakut
06-24-2015, 07:32 PM
not a problem at all. In term 5 you do a preference list by state and the school is very good at giving you your top pick and more so if you live in a certain area.

New York and New Jersey have a lot of spots. I wanted Detroit and despite having family there and strong connections to the area and the test scores they "suggested," SGU still sent me to Jersey. I appealed for months but to no avail. Absolutely the worst placement for my family. My kids are still traumatized. Don't count on them to honor your placement but given you want New York, you will likely get it.

LordFlorianGeyer
06-24-2015, 09:40 PM
New York and New Jersey have a lot of spots. I wanted Detroit and despite having family there and strong connections to the area and the test scores they "suggested," SGU still sent me to Jersey. I appealed for months but to no avail. Absolutely the worst placement for my family. My kids are still traumatized. Don't count on them to honor your placement but given you want New York, you will likely get it.

:( Wow. I am so sorry about your children. Hope it will be all worth it one day, my friend.







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