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Med*1992
03-04-2014, 01:21 PM
I recently graduated from a university of California school with a 3.9 gpa in biology and got a 31 on the MCAT. However, do to certain circumstances I would like to go to medical school as fast as possible and also I am only interested in pursuing a residency in internal medicine. Furthermore, I have almost no extracurriculars besides about 80 hours of shadowing. Is Saba a good choice for me?

Also I have these additional questions:
Is the attendance policy strictly enforced ( I have a very hard time learning from lectures, and went to very few during undergrad)?
How much studying a day on average would it take to at least pass your classes with a 70?
Are the clerkships that the school provides comparable to clerkships at US allopathic schools?
Does anyone have a few of the powerpoints so I could see what the curriculum is like?
Is it possible to graduate from the program in ~3.5 years?
How are the professors and the exams that they give?
What is the student body like?
How much material is covered in one day?

Thanks

devildoc8404
03-04-2014, 01:30 PM
Probably a bad idea, considering your GPA and MCAT performance.

Read up on the Match projections (AAMC and ACGME publications) for FMGs after 2016.

Assuming you want to work in the US after graduation, I would recommend going to a US medical school (MD or DO), even if it costs you a year.

Terp13
03-04-2014, 01:58 PM
Look, I know that feeling but come on! I personally can't think of any circumstance in which you had to go to med-school ASAP but if there is that case, why didn't you apply to US schools this cycle? If there is not a single MD program in this country ready to take you, then I don't know what else to say.
Obviously Cali is super-competitive but have you applied to other west-coast schools and perhaps even some east-coast ones? You would be mildly competitive for Loma Linda in Cali and you have a decent shot at other UC schools as well. Studying medicine is a once in a lifetime opportunity and you want to make sure you get the best shot of doing well.

axiomofchoice
03-04-2014, 03:14 PM
1. You have no idea what specialty you are interested in at this point.

2. You should go to a US medical school. Rushing is silly.

don1
03-06-2014, 07:03 PM
totally agree with aximofchoce.

getting into a caribbean medical school is kinda like getting into medical school. the american and canadian medical community will not treat you like your in medicine until your into residency; i also felt the same way.

in regards to getting into internal. I wanted family medicine when I started and then changed my mind and applied and got into surgery. who knows what you will like. on the other hand caribbean schools are very real medical schools, just risky for many.


1. You have no idea what specialty you are interested in at this point.

2. You should go to a US medical school. Rushing is silly.

drrich2
03-06-2014, 07:50 PM
Is it possible to graduate from the program in ~3.5 years?

Be mindful that the overwhelming majority of graduating medical students get hooked up with residency in an annual March event called the Match. So, graduating in 3.5 years instead of 4, for example, may make no effective difference in when you start residency, depending on how the times fall.

Richard.

Med*1992
03-06-2014, 10:29 PM
The reason that I am quite sure that I want to pursue internal medicine as opposed to other more competitive specialties (such as general surgery) is because I have pretty severe varicose veins and so I can't stand for overly extended periods of time (more than 45 minutes). Therefore, going to a California school or out of state school would probably cost me much more time and money to get to the same place. Furthermore, my thought process is that I usually learn best from books and therefore wherever I go to school I am going to be using the same textbooks to learn.
Also, I do not mind the negative stigma that is associated with going to a Caribbean school because I am really only interested in learning the material and becoming competent.

If I were to pass both steps of the USMLEs 1st try and do well in all of my classes at SABA would there still be a chance that I could go unmatched if I just want an internal medicine residency somewhere in the United States?

devildoc8404
03-07-2014, 04:05 AM
Yes, there is absolutely still that chance.

Hell, it happens NOW, and the numbers of unmatched are expected to climb to even more dramatic levels in the years after 2016. Graduating in 2018 will put you right in the teeth of the AAMC and ACGME have been talking about. Yes, there could be some relief with the MD+DO residency merger, that remains to be seen, but by far your best bet would be to complete a medical degree at a US school.

Not to mention your chances at a subspecialty after residency are higher with a US degree. You have a medically viable reason to eschew the surgical specialties, certainly, but who knows what you will want to go into after graduation? I ended up in an entirely different field than the one I was sure I wanted before medical school, and I know a ton of people who are in the same boat.

Finally, while it is refreshing that you do not mind the "Carib stigma," there is still something to be said for making your CV as competitive as possible. That thing sticks with you for your entire medical career, and not all of your future potential employers may be as enlightened.

Good luck to you, whatever you decide to do.

Scott1981
03-07-2014, 05:37 AM
Yes, there is absolutely still that chance.

Hell, it happens NOW, and the numbers of unmatched are expected to climb to even more dramatic levels in the years after 2016. Graduating in 2018 will put you right in the teeth of the AAMC and ACGME have been talking about. Yes, there could be some relief with the MD+DO residency merger, that remains to be seen, but by far your best bet would be to complete a medical degree at a US school.

Not to mention your chances at a subspecialty after residency are higher with a US degree. You have a medically viable reason to eschew the surgical specialties, certainly, but who knows what you will want to go into after graduation? I ended up in an entirely different field than the one I was sure I wanted before medical school, and I know a ton of people who are in the same boat.

Finally, while it is refreshing that you do not mind the "Carib stigma," there is still something to be said for making your CV as competitive as possible. That thing sticks with you for your entire medical career, and not all of your future potential employers may be as enlightened.

Good luck to you, whatever you decide to do.

although i agree with everyone about going to a US school........... as of now...... the only people that dont match to IM "somewhere", have a red flag somewhere on their application. if one has respectable usmle schools, good grades/LORs, and applies broadly...... they will get matched somewhere....at least the the CURRENT environment. anonymous posters who claim otherwise about their stellar applications and not matching family or IM are usually leaving out the pertinent gaps in their story.

but back to the point..... go to the US school.

Tellingitlikeitis
08-10-2014, 12:54 AM
Coming to a carribean med school is a mistake unless you have NO other option.
I graduated from Saba in 2010 and am now an attending family doc. The island presents many challenges most of which has to do with your absolute lack of human/civil rights. If you are lucky you will get a class that gets along/non-malignant and can through it. Saba was miserable for me. I hate the island and the school.
I now practice medicine in washington state bit wish i had gone to another school.







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