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Jyza85
02-25-2014, 05:52 AM
I am a US citizen that want to do internship/ residency(specialization) in europe. I have a ** in Chemistry and MS. in Biology from the USA and i graduate next year from medical school in Poland. what are the chances of working or getting internship in Scandanavia (Sweden, Norway, Denmark) or Ireland, UK or Germany. i know i can take polish Medical license examination (LEK) next year in Eglish but nothing says i have to do the required internship. any help or infer will be greatly appreciated.

devildoc8404
02-25-2014, 06:50 AM
Check your PMs, I responded to your message.

Basically, the opportunities will depend on citizenship(s) and language(s) spoken, even with an EU medical diploma... and the individual options are too varied to be spelled out here.

Regardless, any of the Scandinavian countries mentioned are currently recruiting docs who have already completed their specialization. Residencies there are almost always limited to citizens. UK is out without UK/EU citizenship. Germany is definitely possible if you can speak C1 level German (B2 at a bare minimum). Ireland may still be feasible, depending on specialty, but competition is going through the roof there.

Cliff's Notes version.

Jyza85
02-25-2014, 11:01 AM
Check your PMs, I responded to your message.

Basically, the opportunities will depend on citizenship(s) and language(s) spoken, even with an EU medical diploma... and the individual options are too varied to be spelled out here.

Regardless, any of the Scandinavian countries mentioned are currently recruiting docs who have already completed their specialization. Residencies there are almost always limited to citizens. UK is out without UK/EU citizenship. Germany is definitely possible if you can speak C1 level German (B2 at a bare minimum). Ireland may still be feasible, depending on specialty, but competition is going through the roof there.

Cliff's Notes version.



Thanks a lot for your help. i just found out that i can take the LEK in Poland and once i pass it that it gives me a full license with out doing a 1 year internship because polish law made their last year of med school into the internship year. the test is also in english as long as the student was in a english program. I am hearing from my classmates from Sweden and Norway that it easier to get a job for specialization than getting an internship.

devildoc8404
02-25-2014, 12:44 PM
Well, that is exactly the opposite of what the Scandinavian recruiting agencies are saying. It is certainly easier for them as Scandinavian students, but if you check the recruiting agencies for these countries you will see no posts listed for specialization positions... only posts for docs with their completed specialization. Unless these students are looking someplace that the rest of us cannot access, which I suppose cannot be ruled out entirely, I would view it as highly unlikely that an unspecialized doctor will be scoring a position in Sweden, Norway, or Denmark.

Yes, the Bulgarians (and others) have a similar thing with the internship counting as a part of the final year of study... but in my experience that does not amount to much in the rest of the EU. It certainly did not count toward getting me a year of seniority to increase my starting salary in Switzerland, I will tell you that much (nor should it, truth be told). If you are training in the UK it counts as the F1 year, which is nice, but that does not really help us as US citizens.

If you find that the students from Sweden and Norway are accurate in their assessment, please let VMD know! I am not planning on leaving where I work, myself, but it would be interesting and helpful to have updated information here. Good luck to you...

Farantino
08-20-2014, 02:15 PM
This is exactly what I had questions about. I am looking towards polish medical schools and as a US citizen I was wondering how hard it was to specialize and then stay in europe? Would the 4 year MD program hold up in the rest of Europe as well?

anyways, Fantastic thread!:cool:

Jagódka
09-07-2014, 06:57 PM
I read that the Polish law requires you to complete an obligatory post-graduate internship (staż podyplomowy) for 18 months and to pass the LEP exam in order to be licensed to practice medicine. So this law was changed and you no longer have to do this internship? Does it apply to 4 year English programs? I'm also a US citizen interested in going to Poland and staying in Europe after graduation, though I might be getting Polish citizenship.

Jagódka
09-10-2014, 02:24 PM
I found proof that you don't have to do the internship on the Medical University of Silesia website, yay!


In accordance with the Resolution of the Ministry of Science and Higher Education of May 9, 2012 concerning education standards in the following fields: medicine, medicine-dentistry, pharmacy, nursing and midwifery, a revised study program was enforced from the academic year 2012/2013.

In view of this regulation 6th (final) year of study in medical field will be focused solely on clinical skills. As a result, students graduating in the academic year 2017/2018 and in subsequent academic years will not be required to complete the postgraduate training, hitherto in force.

Medical graduate is required to pass the final medical exam (LEK) in order to obtain the medical license in Poland. For requirements concerning obtaining medical license in other countries graduates have to meet respective requirements being in force in particular country where he/she is going to practice.

Medical license obtained in Poland should be recognized in EU countries.

thespy
10-08-2014, 03:02 AM
4 years ago Norway and Sweden amended their medical licensing law for applicants from Poland. You can no longer do internship in Norway and Sweden if you begin studying in Poland after the law was changed. You must get your full license (LEK) in Poland. Most EU countries have amended their medical licensing law. You can try to do internship in Ireland and UK - but the system favoritize national/EU citizens. You will need a work visa.

If you could travel back in time and change your life - you should have studied in Czech Republic, Bulgaria, Hungary, or Romania. Once you passed your medical school final exam in one of these countries, you get your diploma along with full license to practice.

The Polish politicians in Warsaw are trying to integrate into this EU universal medical education system, but "communist germs in Łódź" like the little midget named Rafał Kubiak and his servant Mariusz Klencki stand against the change - as they operate CEM.

Poland has been under Communist whip for almost 55 years and so. Now since 25 years or so the country opens its door to foreigners, capitalism, and free market. Some people in Poland are still not accustomed to this open system, especially where CEM is located, a city where communism has a strong root. Many in Łódź still claim it was better life during the communist era. That is why NATO/US is pounding Poland with military intervention to avoid the chaos Ukraine.

These communist germs which operates CEM are still hungry for money! The passing rate for English LEK/LDEK is much more closer to 0% than 100%. CEM claims the cause is because of the huge difference between the Polish and English curricula. Unbelievable!

Łódź and its people are still kind of poor and not willing to give away something for free. Sorry. You might have to pay 340pln many times to get your LEK certificate. This is a system where people look at people's name, appearance, background to assign grade or ask different price for different people. Bribery, corruption is very obvious. And they don't care if you notice it. Of course you can find the ones respecting foreign students but I doubt that there are many.







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