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mdmania
04-28-2013, 01:21 PM
I just applied to AUA and I am kind of nervous. I got rejected from AUC and I guess AUA is really my last chance. My stats are below average, 2.7GPA/2.6sGPA, years of experience in the medical field, 1.5 years of chemistry research, great LOR. I had a 14 on my MCAT (didn't study much) but they said they don't look at it (part of me doesn't believe that, though). Should I be worried? This is my backup plan. I don't have a backup plan for my backup plan. Any info would be great.

2BNMD
04-28-2013, 02:06 PM
nursing school is your plan B.

mdmania
04-28-2013, 02:11 PM
nursing school is your plan B.

I don't think so.

Damascene
04-28-2013, 03:19 PM
You probably wouldn't get direct admission with those stats. However, if accepted, you might be placed in the Basic Science Enhancement Program (BSEP).

mdmania
04-28-2013, 03:22 PM
You probably wouldn't get direct admission with those stats. However, if accepted, you might be placed in the Basic Science Enhancement Program (BSEP).

Damn. That would really suck. I'd rather retake the MCAT and shoot for AUC again.

Terp13
04-28-2013, 04:10 PM
Just retake the MCAT and apply because AUA is becoming relatively competitive recently and though your MCAT might not be looked at if you had their average incoming GPA of around 3.2, with a 2.6, they will look at your MCAT to see if you should be given a chance. And be prepared to be placed in their BSEP program especially if you applied for their Fall semester. The same goes for AUC. Your only chance of direct admission (to AUA since AUC will only consider you for their postbac program) will be if you get a 30 or above and apply in the Spring semester. But even for BSEP you would probably need at least a 24 which is one point below the mean.

dhermon
05-02-2013, 01:56 PM
Only US Citizens and permanent residents are required to submit MCAT scores as it is a requirement of the DOE. AUA does not use MCAT scores when determining admissions. The Admissions Committee will only consider MCAT scores where they are to the benefit of the applicant. Students are welcome to apply, receive a decision and then submit. Scores the rendered decision will not change.

thxleave
05-02-2013, 04:17 PM
I just applied to AUA and I am kind of nervous. I got rejected from AUC and I guess AUA is really my last chance. My stats are below average, 2.7GPA/2.6sGPA, years of experience in the medical field, 1.5 years of chemistry research, great LOR. I had a 14 on my MCAT (didn't study much) but they said they don't look at it (part of me doesn't believe that, though). Should I be worried? This is my backup plan. I don't have a backup plan for my backup plan. Any info would be great.

Dude that is some low numbers. You not going to make it. Bad GPA, can't even make an effort to do better on MCAT. You scoring at like at like bottom 99% of MCAT score.

Go do nursing, you don't got the power to handle med school.

hale
05-02-2013, 06:57 PM
Apply and see, you never know. These schools are going to hard time filling classes with new US schools opening up and PA's making as much basic doctors. If you goto top caribbean schools they still have open seats for May class!

axiomofchoice
05-02-2013, 07:37 PM
Only US Citizens and permanent residents are required to submit MCAT scores as it is a requirement of the DOE. AUA does not use MCAT scores when determining admissions. The Admissions Committee will only consider MCAT scores where they are to the benefit of the applicant. Students are welcome to apply, receive a decision and then submit. Scores the rendered decision will not change.

Why would you not use the MCAT for determining admission? Someone with a 14 is either incredibly lazy or of questionable intellect. Wouldn't that be useful information?

dhermon
05-03-2013, 07:47 AM
Why would you not use the MCAT for determining admission? Someone with a 14 is either incredibly lazy or of questionable intellect. Wouldn't that be useful information?

Great question. AUA feels the MCAT (even with the new changes) is inherently flawed. Studies show it is not a predictor of success as a physician or success in medical school. I understand why other schools use it as a metric, but our admissions committee prefers to evaluate holistically - meaning a full review of the application. Hopefully, personal statements, letters of recommendation, interviews as well as transcripts will flush out if a candidate is lazy or of questionable intellect better than a single exam.

leahstrand
07-29-2013, 02:35 AM
Grades are seriously low to get admission to some accredited school.

PositiveThoughts
10-22-2013, 12:13 AM
mdmania,

I am applying for the fall 2014 cycle at AUA and I have similar stats to you(due to family issues and health), would you mind sharing your experience and how you admission process went?

-Thank You!







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