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abt
06-29-2012, 08:54 PM
Hello fellow doctors and future doctors!

I am looking to enroll in medical programs that teach in English in Europe and in some areas in South America, Asia, and Africa. I have listed the countries below that I would preferably like to go to but if you feel like you have any other suggestions, please feel free. I have already done some extensive research but a lot of the articles I found are out-of-date so I would like to find some newer information. Keep in mind that they have to be taught in English but I am willing to learn another language if it is part of the curriculum. Also, I would like the flexibility of coming back to the US and practicing in California so please keep that in mind as well. I have been looking at which schools are accepted by the Medical Board of California (MBC) and so if you don't know, just list the school and I will look it up if it is accepted by the MBC.

I have looked into schools in Spain, France, Italy, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, and Portugal and found that they only teach in their respective languages. Correct me if I'm wrong as this information that I got was from 5 years ago. I really had my heart set on Spain!

I am looking for both 4-year and 6-year programs. I have a bachelors degree from a Canadian university so it would be nice to see which medical schools are 4-years but I will also look into the 5-6 year programs as well. Also, keep in mind that I do NOT have my MCAT but I do have around 5000 hours of volunteer work (both clinical and extracurricular)

Here is a list of the countries that I would like to go to (and the countries that I have researched in brackets):

Europe
Czech Republic (Charles University (1st, 2nd, and 3rd faculty--6-year program; Masaryk University--6-year program)
Croatia (University of Zagreb--6 year program)
Poland (Poznan University--4-year program)
Slovakia
Hungary
Russia
Ukraine
Greece
Turkey
Cyprus
Romania
Austria
Belgium

Asia
South Korea
Philippines
Japan
Iran
Saudi Arabia

Africa
Morocco
Algeria
South Africa

South America
Brazil
Argentina

Australia
Australia
New Zealand


If you have gotten this far, thanks for reading! Any advice is appreciated.

shrey
07-03-2012, 10:41 AM
I think you must also consider the language you're going to have to learn. Even though all these countries (that are non-English speaking) offer med school programs in English, they will require you to learn the local language for the first 2/3 years in order to communicate with the patients during the clinical years. So choosing a country in the Middle East/Asia/North Africa (Morocco, Algeria) might not be an ideal choice.

If I were you, I would say Australia/NZ as they have some really good schools but getting is not all that easy. CR/Poland/Hungary would follow as they have pretty good programs in Central Europe.

Greece, Belgium, Austria don't have an English programs, while Cyprus just started a new one (which is pretty expensive ~ $35,000/year).

abt
07-03-2012, 11:00 AM
I think you must also consider the language you're going to have to learn. Even though all these countries (that are non-English speaking) offer med school programs in English, they will require you to learn the local language for the first 2/3 years in order to communicate with the patients during the clinical years. So choosing a country in the Middle East/Asia/North Africa (Morocco, Algeria) might not be an ideal choice.

If I were you, I would say Australia/NZ as they have some really good schools but getting is not all that easy. CR/Poland/Hungary would follow as they have pretty good programs in Central Europe.

Greece, Belgium, Austria don't have an English programs, while Cyprus just started a new one (which is pretty expensive ~ $35,000/year).


Thanks for the reply. I don't mind learning another language as that would be a plus but the program has to be mainly in English as it is difficult to master a language in 2-3 years.

I looked at the Australia/NZ schools and they are super expensive.

I am really leaning towards Charles University in Prague 1st Faculty of Medicine. Do you have any information about the curriculum of this school? I know that it's 6 years and I know that it allows me to practice all over the EU. That's what I like about it. How difficult is the entrance examination?

shrey
07-03-2012, 11:36 AM
Indeed, I'm actually a 5th year student at the First Faculty of Medicine, Charles Uni. :) What in particular would you like to know about the curriculum?

A few facts:
- Years 1-3: Preclinicals
- Years 4-6: Clinicals
- The attrition rate at the First Fac. is pretty high during the first 2 years, so you should certainly keep this in mind.
- The faculty has undergone a LOT of changes along with a new, rather committed student organization that is invaluable to students.
- They have hiked up the tuition fee this year, so do check on the website as to how much they charge for the upcoming academic year.
- You have to pass 6 State Exams in order to receive your diploma. 5 (Internal Medicine, Peds, Surgery, Obs&Gyn, and National Heath and Medical Law) of them are in the final year and 1 (Hygiene and Epidemiology) in the 5th year.
- The grading policy goes from 1 to 4. 1 = excellent; 2 = very good; 3 = good; 4 = fail. So the GPA is computed based on this scale.
- Almost all final exams are oral in nature. Most preclinical subjects however, have more final exams composed of two or more components. Eg. for Physiology, there is an MCQ, an ECG interpretation, a practical part (based on the labs done throughout the year), and an oral. And in order to sit the final, one usually needs a credit (and again this varies by the subject. Some subjects have a credit test that may be oral or written, while others have tests throughout the year and require a minimum cumulative of around 65-75%.)

Regarding the entrance exam, I don't know how it is at the moment as a lot of years have passed since I last took it. But I do know that it's quite tricky and not all that easy. You need to have at least a knowledge in Physics/Math, Biology, and Chemistry corresponding to A-level (British) or IB/AP/Basic College level, which shouldn't really be a problem considering you've already obtained your Bacherlors degree.

Hope that helps!

abt
07-03-2012, 12:37 PM
Some questions:

1) What are the differences between the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd faculties? Are they all taught in English?

2) How high is the attrition rate during the first 2 years? I don't want to go to a school that is looking to fail its students because it has to. I know that I have to work hard but at the same time, I want it to be fair and not be corrupt.

3) How does it go in terms of scheduling and classes from the 1st year to the 6th year?

4) Do I do a residency right after the 6 years or is it included in the 6 years?

Thanks for replying again!

shrey
07-03-2012, 01:06 PM
1) The three faculties are all part of Charles University (actually there are 5, but the other two are in other cities.) The three faculties have different curricula, different rules and regulations, different administrations etc. They're all taught in English. Think of it as three different universities.

2) Well I can only tell you about the First Faculty as that's where I attend. The attrition rate is quite high in the first 2 years (We lost about 60-65 students after the first 2 years in my batch.) The profs. are pretty fair and they don't just want to fail people for the sake of it. The standards however, are quite high and they don't compromise on that. That being said, if one works hard at all times, they should have no problems getting through the 1st 2 years.

3) You can check out the schedules on the faculty website but in general, during the clinical years (4-6th years), rotations start from morning 8-12; some start later, some earlier. In the first three years, classes usually tend to be in the afternoon. There are some in the morning. There is no set schedule like in some countries where classes start at 8 and end at 2 or 3 PM. You might have a 2 hour class starting at 8 and then have no classes until 2 PM.

4) A residency? Not at all. You have to apply for a residency program. I'm sorry but I must ask, what do you mean by residency? as in specialization? training? or the internship year? Either ways, you'll have to apply for the program depending on where you want to practice. Each country has its own set of requirements like exams to be completed prior to applying.

Yoma
07-03-2012, 01:36 PM
[QUOTE=abt;1455224 I know that it's 6 years and I know that it allows me to practice all over the EU. That's what I like about it. How difficult is the entrance examination?[/QUOTE]

Just to inform you, if you get a medical degree in any EU medical school, you can practice in any EU country, so long as you can speak the lingua franca of that country fluently. So whether it's charles or not, as long as the school is in the EU, you can practice with the degree in EU countries.

abt
07-03-2012, 02:06 PM
Thanks! You are a information life-saver:D How is Prague? I hear that is a great place to visit from a bunch of tourists but how is it to live there since you have lived there for at least 5 years, if not more. Which district of Prague is the best to live in (I believe the 1st Faculty is in Praha 2). Good nightlife? Any info is awesome!

Thanks again.

abt
07-03-2012, 02:07 PM
Perfect. I would love to practice in Spain and France so I guess I better start brushing up on my Espanol and Francais :)

devildoc8404
07-03-2012, 03:42 PM
Well... sort of, but that's dramatically oversimplified. You will not be getting a training position in Holland if you aren't Dutch, no matter how well you speak Dutch... nor will you get a training position in Sweden if you aren't Swedish, even if you speak Swedish like Peter Freaking Forsberg... and it doesn't matter whether you studied in the EU or not. You will also not be getting a training position in the UK without an EU passport, either, even with an EU diploma. (You could get a gig in Sweden AFTER residency, though, even without an EU passport. Holland and England? Not s'much.)

France might allow you to train there, but you have to take and pass their exam, which ranks medical graduates (#1 to #XXXX). The highest ranked students get the first pick, so if you score well down the list you could easily be aced out of your specialty/location of choice. If they run out of positions before they run out of students, then you are up poop creek without a paddle.

Long story short(er), you MIGHT be able to work in the EU, but it will depend a lot on whether you are an EU citizen, where you want to work, and as pointed out, what languages you speak with a reasonable degree of fluency. Residency training in some countries will absolutely be closed to you if you are not a citizen of that country in some cases, or a citizen of the EU/EEA in some others.


Just to inform you, if you get a medical degree in any EU medical school, you can practice in any EU country, so long as you can speak the lingua franca of that country fluently. So whether it's charles or not, as long as the school is in the EU, you can practice with the degree in EU countries.

Yoma
07-03-2012, 04:43 PM
I assumed that was implied in my post; it makes things easier if you are an EU citizen or have some sort of residency(a visa that allows you to live and work) in the EU country you want to practice.

devildoc8404
07-03-2012, 05:23 PM
Yeah, it's implied, but it's not necessarily clear to a lot of the VMD folks who are not from the EU/EEA. It's a lot easier to manage when you are coming from the UK, that is for sure!

shrey
07-04-2012, 06:20 PM
Thanks! You are a information life-saver:D How is Prague? I hear that is a great place to visit from a bunch of tourists but how is it to live there since you have lived there for at least 5 years, if not more. Which district of Prague is the best to live in (I believe the 1st Faculty is in Praha 2). Good nightlife? Any info is awesome!

Thanks again.

You're welcome. I think Prague is an absolutely amazing city, one that really stays close to you even after you graduate. The city has a strange, yet familiar feel when compared to other major European cities. You really can't get sick of it but many people including me, take our stresses of med school out on the city and it becomes a less and less desirable city with time. At the moment, I really just want to get out because 5 years is already quite crazy and I do miss home. But I'm sure I'd miss the same city once I get back home.

The nicest areas are in Prague 2 (IP Pavlova, Vysehrad, Vinohradska, Bruselska, and part of Namesti Miru).

In terms of nightlife, I don't think you can find a better place in central Europe period. Page has been voted the party capital of central Europe and the number of clubs and choices of music are endless (jazz, hip-hop, rock, Latino, Brazilian, pop you name it.) they're also a lot cheaper when compared to the clubs in the US/UK and the people are much more laid-back.

Georgia1
07-10-2012, 04:04 AM
Georgia also forms part of the english speaking community,TSMU and AIETI Medical School offer courses in English Medium. :)

Georgia1
07-10-2012, 04:06 AM
I would add that in Georgia,we have many people who are English literate ,I can say many times more than you can find in Ukraine,and especially Russia,or Belarus.







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