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NUHS-AUC
03-15-2012, 02:28 PM
More DC colleges and universities are adding PA programs, This is a GREAT option for Chiropractors wishing to move towards mainstream and expand scope.

PA program is an attractive cost effective way to increase scope, earn more, and work in group practices, and most PA programs are 24 months in total.

Bridgeport University (DC & PA program)
MS Physician Assistant Degree | Physician Assistant Program | University of Bridgeport (http://www.bridgeport.edu/academics/graduate/pa)

D'Youville College (DC & PA Programs)
Physician Assistant Degree Program M.S. at D'Youville College in Buffalo, NY (http://www.dyc.edu/academics/physician_assistant/)

NUHS-AUC
03-20-2012, 04:47 PM
Association of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges - University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine (UBCNM) (http://www.aanmc.org/the-schools/u-of-bridgeport--conn.php)

UB offers a PA-DC option for those wish to pursue Chiropractic with expanded scope of practice, actually not bad option for IMGs either that were not matched, this at least allows you to practice medicine in group practice.

CARICOM-MED
04-05-2012, 02:37 PM
I agree a PA degree is a good investment for DC or ND wishing to expand scope and work in mainstream practices....(Group or hospitals)

NUHS-AUC
07-12-2012, 09:28 AM
Exactly :)
The MScACP at NUHS is a nice idea as well, but will take forever to materialize, considering the opposition from the straight DCs, PAs are already licensed in all 50 states, with great scope and income potential.



I agree a PA degree is a good investment for DC or ND wishing to expand scope and work in mainstream practices....(Group or hospitals)

leadsled
07-12-2012, 09:41 AM
Exactly :)
The MScACP at NUHS is a nice idea as well, but will take forever to materialize, considering the opposition from the straight DCs, PAs are already licensed in all 50 states, with great scope and income potential.


PA's with "more scope" is misleading! A PA has to work under a Physician! They are more like Chameleons that change their skin color to match their environment or in other words morph into whatever the Physician's specialty is that they work under. They never have full autonomy. Hence, the word "Assistant".

Doc Mobile
02-13-2015, 09:29 PM
But will they be PHYSICIANS??? That's the word I'm looking for! J. Winterstein- Chiropractor

Doc Mobile
02-13-2015, 09:36 PM
Quite right! MD's love to hire PA's. The PA will see 40+ patients per day and the MD will review a small percentage of the charts (@5%). This way, the doc can be out playing golf and the PA will be doing all the work. Plus, the PA cannot take the patients away and the MD can bill 100% under their own license. GO PA's! Now a FNP? That's an entirely different scenario. The FNP can be autonomous in many states and can take patients from the MD. Only problem? They can only get reimbursed 70% since they are not Doctors.

Doc Mobile
02-13-2015, 09:37 PM
What I want to know is, can an MD correct a subluxation? Is that within their scope of practice?

Doc Mobile
02-17-2015, 07:00 PM
I agree a PA degree is a good investment for DC or ND wishing to expand scope and work in mainstream practices....(Group or hospitals)

Is an PA degree a good investment for a DC,ND wishing to expand scope and work in mainstream practice? Since DC's are not licensed in many countries throughout the world similar to PA's, nor are ND's licensed in other countries, and since PA's need to be under supervision of MD's (something that many DC's would not care for), maybe that's also why so many PA's are getting their MD. Is it that they want equal pay for doing similar work, or is it that they prefer to be able to work independantly and to have the options of specialization? Good question!

Idahopre
05-05-2015, 08:21 AM
Wouldn't it be better for a DC to become a NP so they can continue to practice autonomously? (In some states)

Doc Mobile
05-09-2015, 08:10 PM
Probably, at least for now. But consider the big picture; the AMA has a longstanding history of controlling the healthcare marketplace. They will continue to restrict their competitors ability to diagnose and treat through whatever means possible, including litigation. If it will take 3+ years to become an NP plus about 100k in costs, consider becoming an M.D. This is an unrestricted license, meaning you can do anything that you feel qualified to do-and get paid for it! An amazing combination I'll say. All of these other programs are for a restricted license, meaning that you either will not be allowed to perform certain procedures, or that you will not be able to receive reimbursement. Isn't that the reason that most people want to pursue an additional degree and license? Just a thought.

Doc Mobile
10-31-2018, 09:01 PM
In states like Texas, DC’s are currently allowed to own a “medical clinic”, which would then also allow them to employ an NP. This would seem a much simpler path than becoming an NP yourself, no?







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