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View Full Version : Chiropractic Named One of the Most Underrated Careers in the U.S.



AgActual
09-19-2011, 04:13 PM
There is a lot of talk on message boards like this about how chiropractic is dead end road, where you will beaten down, disrespected, and end up in the poor house. At least one outside group begs to differ. With an average income of $70,000 a year and an employment rate of just 2.3% (current national employment rate is 9.1%) chiropractic comes in at #12 on a list of the most underrated careers in the U.S..

Most Underrated Jobs of 2011 | CareerCast.com (http://www.careercast.com/jobs-rated/most-underrated-jobs-2011)

Most Underrated Jobs of 2011 - 12: Chiropractor | CareerCast.com (http://www.careercast.com/content/most-underrated-jobs-2011-12-chiropractor)

NUHS-AUC
09-20-2011, 04:06 PM
This study doesn't take into account the DCs that dropped out of the profession (like me.) which is a very high percentage......I can state that from my graduating class only 20 are currently practicing....the rest pursued other careers, or returned to their pre-chiropractic positions. (Teaching, Accounting, Investment banking...etc..)



There is a lot of talk on message boards like this about how chiropractic is dead end road, where you will beaten down, disrespected, and end up in the poor house. At least one outside group begs to differ. With an average income of $70,000 a year and an employment rate of just 2.3% (current national employment rate is 9.1%) chiropractic comes in at #12 on a list of the most underrated careers in the U.S..

Most Underrated Jobs of 2011 | CareerCast.com (http://www.careercast.com/jobs-rated/most-underrated-jobs-2011)

Most Underrated Jobs of 2011 - 12: Chiropractor | CareerCast.com (http://www.careercast.com/content/most-underrated-jobs-2011-12-chiropractor)

Forsaken38
09-20-2011, 04:58 PM
Hey NUHS-AUC, how many graduated in your class?

Also, How do you know that it doesn't include people in your category? I didn't see any links to data on the site.

Thanks

khiro
09-21-2011, 10:24 AM
INCOME can consist of different elements. a 70k income is not too bad for average but you should not overlook retirement contributions as well as other impt. factors. and it should be a rare case for someone to agree to work for income only and not include retirement contributions. for comparison, alabama has a minimum salary for teachers. less than 3 yrs with a masters degree you get paid 41,500. add in a 20k value for retirement contribution and you are at 61,500. very low health insurance "value" of 10k per year and your little teacher is making money plus value of 70k. no one can place a value on having summers off.

as far as MDs go, i talked with one yesterday who candidly said she wished she had gone to work for the federal govt b/c she is having to fight for every nickel she gets from the insurance companies. LOL i know all about it; thanks blue cross.

so when you go to talking about money and income, just remember there is more to it than just income.

AgActual
09-21-2011, 11:32 AM
This study doesn't take into account the DCs that dropped out of the profession (like me.) which is a very high percentage......I can state that from my graduating class only 20 are currently practicing....the rest pursued other careers, or returned to their pre-chiropractic positions. (Teaching, Accounting, Investment banking...etc..)

Sounds like a rare exception. I remember last year reading that well over 90% of people with their DC practice as a chiropractor. Being a chiropractor is their career. Some move on to other things but most don't. I know the people over at chirotalk have been attacked for spreading around their "study" which found that 50% of DC's drop out of the field with in 5 years. That number has said to be wildly inaccurate and people have posted evidence on that board to show that isn't the case.

If i can find the source, I will post it but I have never head of 80% of people dropping out of the field after only a few years .



so when you go to talking about money and income, just remember there is more to it than just income.

True but this website that listed chiropractic as an underrated career said they took a look at many factors, not just average income and unemployment rate. I would imagine they would take something like not having health insurance or retiring in poverty into account, if such factors were common. I don't know what their criteria was but that would be a huge oversight if those things were common problems.

NUHS-AUC
09-21-2011, 02:00 PM
Apologies, I would like to add, that I am proud of my education at NUHS, I do believe the chiropractic profession IS MOVING Forward, and with progressive schools like NUHS and WESTERN STATES, you will soon see scope expansion, while "Straight DC" Schools, will atrophy.



Hey NUHS-AUC, how many graduated in your class?

Also, How do you know that it doesn't include people in your category? I didn't see any links to data on the site.

Thanks

Forsaken38
09-21-2011, 03:16 PM
So how many were in your class?



Apologies, I would like to add, that I am proud of my education at NUHS, I do believe the chiropractic profession IS MOVING Forward, and with progressive schools like NUHS and WESTERN STATES, you will soon see scope expansion, while "Straight DC" Schools, will atrophy.

NUHS-AUC
09-21-2011, 03:47 PM
about 55-60 DCs


So how many were in your class?

khiro
09-23-2011, 10:30 AM
True but this website that listed chiropractic as an underrated career said they took a look at many factors, not just average income and unemployment rate. I would imagine they would take something like not having health insurance or retiring in poverty into account, if such factors were common. I don't know what their criteria was but that would be a huge oversight if those things were common problems.[/QUOTE]

yes; but when talking numbers you need to have a good grasp of what your chosen industry will give you in exchange for your education and work. i was equating the numbers for the avg. chiro in the study to the avg. teacher in alabama with less than 3 yrs experience (the teacher pay jumps up after that to a base of $45,700 for yrs 3-5). so you should sort of ponder if you became a DC what should your pay be? that is left to each person. for me i would place a 200k a yr collection minimum inorder for me to stay in chiro. after OH, taxes, retirement contribution you are left with a good professional salary. but lets not forget the quality of life issue. i have had a pretty good QOL in my practice as has most solo DCs. after all, i am the boss. now go and ask the avg teacher how their quality of life is at work.... so money isn't everything.

canuckdc
09-23-2011, 04:38 PM
This study doesn't take into account the DCs that dropped out of the profession (like me.) which is a very high percentage......I can state that from my graduating class only 20 are currently practicing....the rest pursued other careers, or returned to their pre-chiropractic positions. (Teaching, Accounting, Investment banking...etc..)

Sorry, looks like you dropped out right after graduation and never gave it a chance. From my graduating class which was long before you, most of us are kicking around

AgActual
09-26-2011, 08:19 PM
Sorry, looks like you dropped out right after graduation and never gave it a chance. From my graduating class which was long before you, most of us are kicking around

Yeah, I know quite a few people that have graduated from chiropractic school now and most are doing just fine. Some are still new to the field, so their salaries aren't astronomical but they aren't horrible either, and the worst case i know about, the guy is only doing ok and teaches to supplement his income. But no one is in dire poverty, no has dropped out of the field, no one says they regret going to chiropractic school. The worst situation i have heard about, and I didn't actually know this person, was someone that waited until a few weeks before graduation to start looking for a job and could only find one making $18,000 a year. But that was a real stupid move on his part, waiting so long. From what I have seen, if you give yourself enough time, you can find a job no problem. There are a ton of jobs postings at the school from all over the country, which are updated regularly. It seems if you are proactive about it, there is no reason you can't thrive in this field. I think the tales of doom and gloom are mostly exaggerated.

AgActual
09-27-2011, 08:07 AM
Looks like this list was adopted by Forbes.

The Most Underrated Jobs | Power Your Future - Yahoo! Finance (http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/power-your-future/most-underrated-jobs-200944457.html)

NUHS-AUC
09-28-2011, 01:03 PM
No offence to you all but, you JUST PROVED my point, Chiropractic (as much as I love the profession) doesn't make sense (currently, due to high tuition / credit.) as a career choice, you spend over 150K in tuition for the 7-8 years total to make 60-70K, while a dental hygienist, teacher or even a paralegal make just as much with 1-2 years education, and their tuition is a FRACTION of what you would have to pay as a DC student.

I rest my case, you can argue as much as you want, but unless Chiropractic scope expands, to include full PCP rights, I don't think it is a good career choice at the present time, considering the HIGH tuition and duration of education to become a DC. (might as well become a DO or MD.)
The profession MUST move forward, or it will be swallowed by the DPTs & DOs.....the profession MUST become more involved with public health, and adhere to scientific standards, facts are just facts.....

Dental Hygienist (same income as DC for tuition of 20-30K, and 2 years of education.)
Most Underrated Jobs of 2011 - 9: Dental Hygienist | CareerCast.com (http://www.careercast.com/content/most-underrated-jobs-2011-9-dental-hygienist)




Looks like this list was adopted by Forbes.

The Most Underrated Jobs | Power Your Future - Yahoo! Finance (http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/power-your-future/most-underrated-jobs-200944457.html)

Forsaken38
09-28-2011, 06:26 PM
None taken. We are each entitled to our opinions. Again I think that other factors like being your own boss make up the value not seen in reported income. The interesting thing is you base your response solely off the average income reported in this study. How much does a chiro have to make in order for it to be worth it? I think that is a personal question. If the answer isn't enough for you then you make a change.

NUHS-AUC
09-28-2011, 07:55 PM
sorry, just wish the profession will take all necessary steps to move forward, and become mainstream as it SHOULD BE, and finally put an end to some of the straight wacko out there !


None taken. We are each entitled to our opinions. Again I think that other factors like being your own boss make up the value not seen in reported income. The interesting thing is you base your response solely off the average income reported in this study. How much does a chiro have to make in order for it to be worth it? I think that is a personal question. If the answer isn't enough for you then you make a change.

AgActual
09-28-2011, 08:51 PM
No offence to you all but, you JUST PROVED my point, Chiropractic (as much as I love the profession) doesn't make sense (currently, due to high tuition / credit.) as a career choice, you spend over 150K in tuition for the 7-8 years total to make 60-70K,

I think there are a few problems with this argument.

First, we are looking at a national average here. It is pretty well known that how much money you make as a chiropractor really depends on where you practice. Of course this is a flaw with our field, however, one that virtually every profession has besides medicine. A chiropractor starting out would be wise to set up shop in a state where chiropractic is popular, like Iowa, Illinois, Oregon, Arizona and not in places like Florida, Michigan, and New York. You see you can search the pay distributions for many careers, based on location, instead of just looking at the national average. So in places where chiropractic is popular, the average is closer to $120,000 a year. In places where it isn't, we are down in maybe the $60,000 range. Like setting up most businesses, location is important. What we are essentially doing here is comparing the one exception to this rule, working as an MD in a field where you can practice pretty much anywhere you want and rake in the cash, to a more typical career/business, like chiropractic. Doesn't seem fair.

Second, why are we even comparing DC's to MD's? Medical doctors are among the highest paid professionals around. So most DC's make less than MD's, big deal. That doesn't make chiropractic a low paying career. In fact, that is the same case that most non-MD/DO health care students should expect to see. What about a clinical psychologist? They spent years getting their doctorates, many have the same debt and the national average pay is about $50,000 but we don't raise the red flag and say "don't become a psychologist!". What about DPT's. They were on that list too and they make virtually the same amount as DC's, with the same debt. But we aren't relentlessly hammering away at them right now for making poor career choices. Same with optometrists. I think the national average is in the $80,000-$90,000 range. Not significantly better. They aren't getting their degrees for free, yet we don't say that is a bad career. So if we can find so many other doctoral level health care fields with the same debt and roughly the same pay, why are we singling out chiropractic?

But of course we need to ask ourselves, is money everything? Does making a lot of money guarantee a good career? What about doing something you enjoy? Many chiropractors love what they do. Chiropractic enjoys one of the highest levels of job satisfaction of any career. What if I wake up every morning excited to go to work, instead of it just being another day? Doesn't that count for something? And what about the stress? Being a medical doctor is far more stressful than being a DC. What about factoring that in? The average work week for a DC is about 37 hours, the last time I checked, and it is a 9-5 job. Many medical doctors work much more than 37 hours a week and aren't fortunate enough to work such normal hours. Isn't that a good trade off?

Of course there is the argument that it doesn't matter if you love your job, if you aren't making enough money, it isn't worth it. So lets say that any of the DC students here end up making $70,000 or $75,000 a year. Not unreasonable to expect that. Is that really too low? Of course that won't buy you a mansion or Lamborghini but you will hardly be living in a box on the street either. $75,000 is certainly enough to make house payments in a pretty nice place and have a good car. $75,000 will certainly buy you enough food to eat, let you put money away in savings, maybe put towards a vacation every few years, and make student loan payments. You may not spend your Saturdays out on yacht or buy a vacation house in Hawaii but you could certainly live comfortably and take care of your responsibilities and plan for your future. So what is the problem?


And if anyone says that isn't the case, that $75,000 a year isn't enough to live on with student loan debt, I do wonder about all of the people I know who are pretty much in that situation. My brother is one a perfect example. He has his masters in engineering. He went to college at private universities and has roughly the same debt as a DC. He makes about $80,000 a year. He lives in a very nice house. It doesn't have eight bedrooms or an indoor swimming pool, luxuries that our MD friends may be able to afford, but it is really nice. He has a good car, goes on vacation once or twice a year, has nice, new appliances and electronics, invests money in his retirement, and makes student loan payments with no real strain. He has a good life and loves what he does, so should we say "he invested $150,000 in his education and doesn't make as much as an MD, he is a failure and has made horrible choices."?


Money isn't everything, friends.

Forsaken38
09-28-2011, 09:20 PM
I very emphatically agree with you on this. :)

It is going to take the continued effort of everyone for the next few years to make the necessary changes.


sorry, just wish the profession will take all necessary steps to move forward, and become mainstream as it SHOULD BE, and finally put an end to some of the straight wacko out there !

NUHS-AUC
09-28-2011, 09:43 PM
AgActual,
I have to admit that it was an absolute pleasure reading your comments (as well as some of the past ones.), and I surely hope next generation DCs will adopt your belief system, I suppose, I expected so much different things after graduating as a DC, I DID want the same prestige and income as some of my friends that graduated as MDs, and were past residency. I refused to continue with my associateship position that was low pay, not sufficient to pay back my loans. I KNOW I am not the only one with same or similar Hx, However, I know that eventually CHIROPRACTIC WILL expand and progress forward, this is the begining of a turning point....straight schools are closing down, while progressive schools like NUHS are EXPANDING with innovative programs (MScACP) and additional degrees that will complement the profession.

AgActual, Bravo !, I hope we can meet one day, I live in Chicago, and visit NUHS once in a while, keep the momentum up and hope to see more new DCs like you that will finally make a difference and CHANGE CHIROPRACTIC :) I know president JfW is on board with what you are stating. (as too he is pushing for a change in the profession.)

Good luck with that !


I think there are a few problems with this argument.

First, we are looking at a national average here. It is pretty well known that how much money you make as a chiropractor really depends on where you practice. Of course this is a flaw with our field, however, one that virtually every profession has besides medicine. A chiropractor starting out would be wise to set up shop in a state where chiropractic is popular, like Iowa, Illinois, Oregon, Arizona and not in places like Florida, Michigan, and New York. You see you can search the pay distributions for many careers, based on location, instead of just looking at the national average. So in places where chiropractic is popular, the average is closer to $120,000 a year. In places where it isn't, we are down in maybe the $60,000 range. Like setting up most businesses, location is important. What we are essentially doing here is comparing the one exception to this rule, working as an MD a field where you can practice pretty much anywhere you want and rake in the cash, to a more typical career/business. Doesn't seem fair.

Second, why are we even comparing DC's to MD's? Medical doctors are among the highest paid professionals around. So most DC's make less than MD's, big deal. That doesn't make chiropractic a low paying career. In fact, that is the same case that most non-MD/DO health care students should expect to see. What about a clinical psychologist? They spent years getting their doctorates, many have the same debt and the national average is about $50,000 but we don't raise the red flag and say "don't become a psychologist!". What about DPT's. They were on that list too and they make virtually the same amount as DC's, with the same debt. But we aren't relentlessly hammering away at them right now for making poor career choices. Same with optometrists. I think the national average is in the $80,000-$90,000 range. Not significantly better. They aren't getting their degrees for free, yet we don't say that is a bad career. So if we can find so many other doctoral level health care fields with the same debt and roughly the same pay, why are we singling out chiropractic?

But of course we need to ask ourselves, is money everything? Does making a lot of money guarantee a good career? What about doing something you enjoy? Many chiropractors love what they do. What if I wake up every morning excited to go to work, instead of it just being another day? Doesn't that count for something? And what about the stress factor? Being a medical doctor is far more stressful than being a DC. What about factoring that in? The average work week for a DC is about 37 hours the last time I checked and it is a 9-5 job. Many medical doctors work much more than that and many don't get such normal hours. Isn't that a good trade off?

Of course there is the argument that it doesn't matter if you love your job, if you aren't making enough money, it isn't worth it. So lets say that any of the DC students here end up making $70,000 or $75,000 a year. Not unreasonable to expect that. Is that really too low? Of course that won't buy you a mansion or Lamborghini but you will hardly be living in a box on the street either. $75,000 is certainly enough to make house payments in a pretty nice place and have a good car. $75,000 will certainly buy you enough food to eat, let you put money away in savings, maybe put towards a vacation every few years, and make student loan payments. You may not spend your Saturdays out on yacht or buy a vacation house in Hawaii but you could certainly live comfortably and take care of your responsibilities and plan for your future. So what is the problem?


And if anyone says that isn't the case, that $75,000 a year isn't enough to live on with student loan debt, I do wonder about all of the people I know who are pretty much in that situation. My brother has his masters in engineering. He went to college at private universities and has roughly the same debt as a DC. He makes about $80,000 a year. He lives in a very nice house. It doesn't have eight bedrooms or an indoor swimming pool, luxuries that our MD friends may be able to afford, but it is really nice. He has a good car, goes on vacation once or twice a year, has nice, new appliances and electronics, invests money in his retirement, and makes student loan payments with no real strain. He has a good life and loves what he does, so should we say "he invested $150,000 in his education and doesn't make as much as an MD, he is a failure and has made horrible choices."?


Money isn't everything, friends.

AgActual
10-11-2011, 09:40 AM
The same group that made the underrated careers list, has made a list of the 12 most overrated careers and positions 2, 3, and 4 are taken up by medical doctors. #2 is surgeon, #3 is a family physician, and #4 is a psychiatrist. While the pay is quite good for all 3 careers, ($365,000 per year for a surgeon, $194,000 per year for a GP, and $160,000 for a psychiatrist), this company or whatever, sites long hours and high stress as massive downsides that people overlook.

Now personally, I don't think that any of these careers are overrated. However, I do think it makes a good point about why money isn't the only thing that matters when picking a career. Sure it would be great to make $365,000 a year but personally I wouldn't be able to handle the stress of being a surgeon. And being a family physician would probably double my income but dealing with internal disorders has no appeal to me.

For me, chiropractic is a great fit. What I want is a health care career, focused on musculoskeletal conditions and nutrition, with freedom, normal hours, and low stress. My trade off is potentially mediocre (but not horrible) pay. And that is ok, it is a deal I am willing to make. Some of us want the fast paced life of a surgeon or to be a central figure in health care, like a general practitioner, and some of us want something else.

Maybe before we label careers as underrated or overrated, or good or bad, or talk about who made the best life decisions, we should realize that we all have our own dreams and desires for what we want out of life. Really thinking about what you want to do will lead you to the right path. And it may not be the highest paying job or the most prestigious but it will be the right career, for you.


Most Overrated Jobs of 2011 | CareerCast.com (http://www.careercast.com/jobs-rated/most-overrated-jobs-2011)

Chirosweetie
10-27-2011, 06:49 PM
Salary Data Results


Your salary data output values, seeking employment as Chiropractors in Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA:

There are 410 persons employed as Chiropractors in Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA.

Starting salaries (The 10th percentile) for this occupation are $27940

The median salary for this occupation is $38110.

The top earners for this occupation have an annualized salary of $83870

Based upon the information that you have provided, the market will likely offer you an annual salary of approximately $36500.

The above figures represent monetary compensation only, and do not include any other forms of compensation, such as: benefits, overtime or bonus pay.

THESE FIGURES COME FROM NACE.

UNFORTUNATELY, THESE NUMBERS ARE CONSISTENT WITH MY EXPERIENCE AS A CHIROPRACTOR IN GEORGIA SINCE 2003. I WAS FORCED TO ACCEPT $25K + BONUS AT MY LAST JOB WHEN I STARTED THERE IN 2007 WHILE WORKING CLOSE TO 50 HOURS A WEEK (I HAVE WORKED AS MANY AS 55 HOURS). LAST YEAR I MADE $50K (THANK GOD FOR BONUSES AND RAISES) WHICH IS THE MOST I HAVE EVER MADE. IT IS DIFFICULT TO PAY OFF $150K IN STUDENT LOANS WHEN YOUR PAY IS SO LOW. AT LIFE, THEY TOLD US ABOUT CHIROPRACTORS MAKING HALF A MILLION A YEAR, AND I SAW AVERAGE SALARIES WELL OVER $100K WHEN I DID MY RESEARCH IN THE LATE 90'S BEFORE BEGINNING CHIROPRACTIC SCHOOL. TOO BAD THIS IS NOT THE REALITY FOR MOST DOCTORS IN MOST STATES. AFTER GRADUATING IN 2002, I PRACTICED IN MICHIGAN FOR A YEAR MAKING ONLY $28K A YEAR (BEST OFFER WHICH REALLY SHOCKED ME).

I HAVE BEEN UNEMPLOYED SINCE JULY BECAUSE THE OFFICE I WORKED AT CLOSED DUE TO POOR MONEY MANAGEMENT (THEY WERE COLLECTING $18K-36K A MONTH, BUT OWED MORE THAN $40K IN BACK RENT). THERE ARE MORE CHIROPRACTORS THAN JOBS IN THIS AREA, SO I RESEARCHED OTHER AREAS WHERE I THOUGHT I MIGHT LIKE TO LIVE, BUT DID NOT LIKE THE SALARIES THERE EITHER. TENNESSEE WAS THE ONE EXCEPTION, BUT I DIDN'T SEE ANY JOBS, AND I DON'T HAVE THE FUNDS TO START A PRACTICE. PLUS I WOULD LIKE TO LIVE IN AN AREA FOR AT LEAST A YEAR BEFORE I OPEN A PRACTICE THERE.

I LOVE CHIROPRACTIC BECAUSE I HAVE SEEN A LOT OF PATIENTS GET BETTER WHILE UNDER CARE, BUT I DON'T LIKE THE PAY, THE HOURS OR THE IN-FIGHTING, SO I AM LOOKING AT PA AND NP PROGRAMS. I WOULD LOVE TO PRACTICE CHIROPRACTIC AS LONG AS I'M PHYSICALLY ABLE IF THE PAY AND HOURS WERE BETTER, AND IF THERE WAS NO IN-FIGHTING.

WE ARE MOST DEFINITELY UNDERRATED AND UNDERPAID!

Chirosweetie
10-27-2011, 06:50 PM
Salary Data Results


Your salary data output values, seeking employment as Chiropractors in Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA:

There are 410 persons employed as Chiropractors in Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA.

Starting salaries (The 10th percentile) for this occupation are $27940

The median salary for this occupation is $38110.

The top earners for this occupation have an annualized salary of $83870

Based upon the information that you have provided, the market will likely offer you an annual salary of approximately $36500.

The above figures represent monetary compensation only, and do not include any other forms of compensation, such as: benefits, overtime or bonus pay.

THESE FIGURES COME FROM NACE.

UNFORTUNATELY, THESE NUMBERS ARE CONSISTENT WITH MY EXPERIENCE AS A CHIROPRACTOR IN GEORGIA SINCE 2003. I WAS FORCED TO ACCEPT $25K + BONUS AT MY LAST JOB WHEN I STARTED THERE IN 2007 WHILE WORKING CLOSE TO 50 HOURS A WEEK (I HAVE WORKED AS MANY AS 55 HOURS). LAST YEAR I MADE $50K (THANK GOD FOR BONUSES AND RAISES) WHICH IS THE MOST I HAVE EVER MADE. IT IS DIFFICULT TO PAY OFF $150K IN STUDENT LOANS WHEN YOUR PAY IS SO LOW. AT LIFE, THEY TOLD US ABOUT CHIROPRACTORS MAKING HALF A MILLION A YEAR, AND I SAW AVERAGE SALARIES WELL OVER $100K WHEN I DID MY RESEARCH IN THE LATE 90'S BEFORE BEGINNING CHIROPRACTIC SCHOOL. TOO BAD THIS IS NOT THE REALITY FOR MOST DOCTORS IN MOST STATES. AFTER GRADUATING IN 2002, I PRACTICED IN MICHIGAN FOR A YEAR MAKING ONLY $28K A YEAR (BEST OFFER WHICH REALLY SHOCKED ME).

I HAVE BEEN UNEMPLOYED SINCE JULY BECAUSE THE OFFICE I WORKED AT CLOSED DUE TO POOR MONEY MANAGEMENT (THEY WERE COLLECTING $18K-36K A MONTH, BUT OWED MORE THAN $40K IN BACK RENT). THERE ARE MORE CHIROPRACTORS THAN JOBS IN THIS AREA, SO I RESEARCHED OTHER AREAS WHERE I THOUGHT I MIGHT LIKE TO LIVE, BUT DID NOT LIKE THE SALARIES THERE EITHER. TENNESSEE WAS THE ONE EXCEPTION, BUT I DIDN'T SEE ANY JOBS, AND I DON'T HAVE THE FUNDS TO START A PRACTICE. PLUS I WOULD LIKE TO LIVE IN AN AREA FOR AT LEAST A YEAR BEFORE I OPEN A PRACTICE THERE.

I LOVE CHIROPRACTIC BECAUSE I HAVE SEEN A LOT OF PATIENTS GET BETTER WHILE UNDER CARE, BUT I DON'T LIKE THE PAY, THE HOURS OR THE IN-FIGHTING, SO I AM LOOKING AT PA AND NP PROGRAMS. I WOULD LOVE TO PRACTICE CHIROPRACTIC AS LONG AS I'M PHYSICALLY ABLE IF THE PAY AND HOURS WERE BETTER, AND IF THERE WAS NO IN-FIGHTING.

WE ARE MOST DEFINITELY UNDERRATED AND UNDERPAID!

NUHS-AUC
10-29-2011, 10:07 AM
This solidifies my argument, although I love Evidence based Chiropractic, the straights are just ruining any credibility for the profession, instead of moving the profession forward, as per president JfW of NUHS, allowing DCs to prescribe (basic formulary.) and perform minor surgery, also change the education as per NUHS, at least 2 classes in Pharm, and one class in surgery, less philosophy...

Unless Chiropractic change, you will see the profession atrophy even more and less pay !
that is right average income is in the 30s.....while a first year RN is earning in the 50s....and first year R1, Resident is making mid 50s these days, after residency average MD is making at least 150K, I can't imagine average DC is making 150K after 2-3 years in practice.

I encourage all EBM DCs to start a movement to support the CCE, and NUHS.
NUHS also started a nice MSc (ACP) that will help move the profession to where it should be...mainstream and well respected.....

Regards,



Salary Data Results


Your salary data output values, seeking employment as Chiropractors in Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA:

There are 410 persons employed as Chiropractors in Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA.

Starting salaries (The 10th percentile) for this occupation are $27940

The median salary for this occupation is $38110.

The top earners for this occupation have an annualized salary of $83870

Based upon the information that you have provided, the market will likely offer you an annual salary of approximately $36500.

The above figures represent monetary compensation only, and do not include any other forms of compensation, such as: benefits, overtime or bonus pay.

THESE FIGURES COME FROM NACE.

UNFORTUNATELY, THESE NUMBERS ARE CONSISTENT WITH MY EXPERIENCE AS A CHIROPRACTOR IN GEORGIA SINCE 2003. I WAS FORCED TO ACCEPT $25K + BONUS AT MY LAST JOB WHEN I STARTED THERE IN 2007 WHILE WORKING CLOSE TO 50 HOURS A WEEK (I HAVE WORKED AS MANY AS 55 HOURS). LAST YEAR I MADE $50K (THANK GOD FOR BONUSES AND RAISES) WHICH IS THE MOST I HAVE EVER MADE. IT IS DIFFICULT TO PAY OFF $150K IN STUDENT LOANS WHEN YOUR PAY IS SO LOW. AT LIFE, THEY TOLD US ABOUT CHIROPRACTORS MAKING HALF A MILLION A YEAR, AND I SAW AVERAGE SALARIES WELL OVER $100K WHEN I DID MY RESEARCH IN THE LATE 90'S BEFORE BEGINNING CHIROPRACTIC SCHOOL. TOO BAD THIS IS NOT THE REALITY FOR MOST DOCTORS IN MOST STATES. AFTER GRADUATING IN 2002, I PRACTICED IN MICHIGAN FOR A YEAR MAKING ONLY $28K A YEAR (BEST OFFER WHICH REALLY SHOCKED ME).

I HAVE BEEN UNEMPLOYED SINCE JULY BECAUSE THE OFFICE I WORKED AT CLOSED DUE TO POOR MONEY MANAGEMENT (THEY WERE COLLECTING $18K-36K A MONTH, BUT OWED MORE THAN $40K IN BACK RENT). THERE ARE MORE CHIROPRACTORS THAN JOBS IN THIS AREA, SO I RESEARCHED OTHER AREAS WHERE I THOUGHT I MIGHT LIKE TO LIVE, BUT DID NOT LIKE THE SALARIES THERE EITHER. TENNESSEE WAS THE ONE EXCEPTION, BUT I DIDN'T SEE ANY JOBS, AND I DON'T HAVE THE FUNDS TO START A PRACTICE. PLUS I WOULD LIKE TO LIVE IN AN AREA FOR AT LEAST A YEAR BEFORE I OPEN A PRACTICE THERE.

I LOVE CHIROPRACTIC BECAUSE I HAVE SEEN A LOT OF PATIENTS GET BETTER WHILE UNDER CARE, BUT I DON'T LIKE THE PAY, THE HOURS OR THE IN-FIGHTING, SO I AM LOOKING AT PA AND NP PROGRAMS. I WOULD LOVE TO PRACTICE CHIROPRACTIC AS LONG AS I'M PHYSICALLY ABLE IF THE PAY AND HOURS WERE BETTER, AND IF THERE WAS NO IN-FIGHTING.

WE ARE MOST DEFINITELY UNDERRATED AND UNDERPAID!

canuckdc
10-29-2011, 10:02 PM
The top earners for this occupation have an annualized salary of $83870

Thats a load of crap....Top earners in chiropractic out earn most top earning MD's. these figures are way out,

NUHS-AUC
10-30-2011, 02:50 PM
Sir, that is so not true, top MD ? what do you mean by that ? which speciality ? Surgeon ? dermatologist ? Family Doc ? Plastic surgeon ?
average family MD in the US is earning 150K per year, average DC in the US, regardless of DC speciality is earning 75K.

Top DCs, are top 10% bracket of the profession, might earn just over 150K per year, while it is safe to state that at least 90% of MDs are earning well over 150K, per year..... Regardless of speciality, I might add.....

Chiropractor Salary (http://www.healthcaresalaryonline.com/chiropractor-salary.html)

and I quote:
" Annually
On an annual basis the median chiropractor’s salary is $67,650. The lowest 10% earn $32,750 per year while the upper 10% earn more than $150,570 per year. These salaries are calculated as a mean or average.
Lowest and Highest Chiropractor Salaries
The lowest paid chiropractor earns less than $33,000 annually while the highest paid Chiropractor earns $151,000 per year."



The top earners for this occupation have an annualized salary of $83870"



Thats a load of crap....Top earners in chiropractic out earn most top earning MD's. these figures are way out,

thebonecrusher10
12-06-2011, 09:25 PM
You have a typo I'm afraid. It should say, "Chiropractic Named One of the Most OVERRATED 'Careers' in the U.S."

InnovaPain
12-07-2011, 12:45 PM
I had about 100 in my graduating class in 1995. I do not know how many are still at it. I am one of those guys that has really struggled over the years. I don't play the blame game, nor do I visit chirotalk too often. ***** and his crew just bring me down.

NUHS-AUC
12-11-2011, 10:16 PM
John Demartini - doing what you love - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBnr_VKpIPE&feature=related)

You can surely be a successful DC, and do what you love, if you don't and rather be something else, then change !


I had about 100 in my graduating class in 1995. I do not know how many are still at it. I am one of those guys that has really struggled over the years. I don't play the blame game, nor do I visit chirotalk too often. ***** and his crew just bring me down.

khiro
12-12-2011, 11:59 AM
NUHS-AUC IS SPOT ON. Dr. D grad. from TCC a little before me but came in a couple of times while we were seniors to "inspire". he has been doing this type of work for yrs. i think he is still in houston.



John Demartini - doing what you love - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBnr_VKpIPE&feature=related)

You can surely be a successful DC, and do what you love, if you don't and rather be something else, then change !

AgActual
12-12-2011, 12:30 PM
John Demartini - doing what you love - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBnr_VKpIPE&feature=related)

You can surely be a successful DC, and do what you love, if you don't and rather be something else, then change !

NUHS-AUC, do you think the reason why people drop out of this profession is because they never had much of a passion for this career, in the first place? I could see how someone just graduating from med school might have little interest in actually practicing, being burned out or just losing interest over time in medicine, but the money is too good to pass up. Do you think that people that were only marginally interested in being a chiropractor quickly give up when they realize that they will probably start off at about $40,000 a year and after 5 years, maybe only be at about $80,000-$90,000 a year?

I do wonder why some people quit so quickly. I have seen a few people that gave up on chiropractic after only a few weeks of looking for a job, after they graduated. One guy I know that graduated a few months ago hasn't even started looking for a job yet and doesn't seem to have much of a desire to do so. Surely those that fail are most likely those that never had their hearts set on this career, in the first place, right?

7125
03-10-2012, 12:32 PM
Sir, that is so not true, top MD ? what do you mean by that ? which speciality ? Surgeon ? dermatologist ? Family Doc ? Plastic surgeon ?
average family MD in the US is earning 150K per year, average DC in the US, regardless of DC speciality is earning 75K.

Top DCs, are top 10% bracket of the profession, might earn just over 150K per year, while it is safe to state that at least 90% of MDs are earning well over 150K, per year..... Regardless of speciality, I might add.....

Chiropractor Salary (http://www.healthcaresalaryonline.com/chiropractor-salary.html)

and I quote:
" Annually
On an annual basis the median chiropractor’s salary is $67,650. The lowest 10% earn $32,750 per year while the upper 10% earn more than $150,570 per year. These salaries are calculated as a mean or average.
Lowest and Highest Chiropractor Salaries
The lowest paid chiropractor earns less than $33,000 annually while the highest paid Chiropractor earns $151,000 per year."



Actually $150k is not uncommon at all for DCs. Perhaps the ranges we see between 30-60k reflect incomes of new graduates or those in rural areas. Although I do know of a few DCs in rural areas making in excess of $250k. canuckdc is not lying when he says that some top earner DCs outperform some MDs financially. I know of several very business-minded DCs who make 7-figures a year and a couple have recently sold their businesses to large multinational organizations for a pretty penny and stay on as managers/consultants. But these are the outliers who A) Graduated from chiropractic school at a time when there was not a lot of competition for business and developed strong reputations for themselves over the years, B) Are very well connected politically and have been instrumental in making changes that benefit the chiropractic profession (and themselves of course) and C) Made it difficult for the younger generations of chiropractors to achieve this same level of success due to competing business interests and connections with payers and other referral agencies. I will not get into this third point in great detail, but the take home message is some DCs are doing extremely well for themselves immaterial of the economic situation due to a number of factors (political connections being one of the biggest factors).







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