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gotmd?
09-04-2011, 03:39 PM
These are the schools that are accredited by the Medical Board of California.


University of the West Indies


American University of the Caribbean


Saba University School of Medicine


St. George's University


Ross University School of Medicine


American University of Antigua College of Medicine



Of all these, which ones will accept high school students straight out of high school? I am extremely motivated in becoming a doctor, so I really want to go to a direct medical program. Also, I was looking into CMU and Avalon University School of Medicine.. any info on those?


So in short:

Please, if you can, let me know which Caribbean medical schools accept students straight out of high school. Thanks in advance!

devildoc8404
09-04-2011, 03:45 PM
Straight to Carib out of high school is a bad idea for a load of reasons already elucidated in the VMD forum. I don't frankly know which Carib schools offer this sort of short-cut, but I would not recommend it to anyone I cared about.

If you are absolutely bound and determined to complete a 6-year program out of high school, please do yourself a favor and consider going to a country where that form of medical education is the norm, and do it that way. It will be cheaper (in some cases) and there will be far less of a chance of future problems with licensing, etc.

I happen to think that Ireland offers some of the best options for this, and wish that I had known about them when I was coming out of HS, but there are 6-year programs all over Europe, Asia, and South America.

devildoc8404
09-04-2011, 03:46 PM
(And better yet... if you eventually want to practice in the States, your best option is to go to college/university in the States, kick butt, and go to a US medical school.)

gotmd?
09-04-2011, 04:28 PM
Thank you devildoc, I will definitely look into other direct med programs. The only problem is that I'm not sure if I can succeed in college at a 4 year program, so if I get into a 6 year program, at least I know for sure that I'm in med school. I'm good at science and math but am not so well in English and History, which is the main reason I want to go to a 6 year program- utilize my best qualities, and become a great doctor at the end of it! But I will look into other direct med programs, do you have any in mind that you would recommend? Thank you for helping me on this, I really REALLY appreciate it! :)

gotmd?
09-04-2011, 04:40 PM
I was looking, and found this school: Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. How competitive are these schools? I know that Carib. med schools aren't very competitive, but what about ones from other countries?

devildoc8404
09-04-2011, 04:45 PM
The best 6-year options I know of are to be found in:

Republic of Ireland (Atlantic Bridge: US and Canadian students studying medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine in Ireland (http://www.atlanticbridge.com)), UK or other Western Europe (if you speak the language)
Eastern European programs on the California Medical Board-approved list (Jagiellonian in Warsaw, Charles First Faculty in Prague, Semmelweis in Budapest, etc.)

Note that there are plenty of NON-CMB-approved 6-year programs in E-Eu, but from my experience, you don't really want to look at those unless every other option poops the bed.

There are some others in Asia and South America, but I don't know much about them. (Plus, I do like Europe a lot.)

devildoc8404
09-04-2011, 04:49 PM
RCSI is very good. It is one of the schools in Ireland that accepts North American applications through Atlantic Bridge.

It is possibly not as good (reputation-wise) as Trinity-Dublin or a few of the others, but honestly, none of the schools in Ireland suck... admission is competitive overall, but not cut-throat, from what I have seen. Atlantic Bridge can give you more detailed information on that.


I was looking, and found this school: Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. How competitive are these schools? I know that Carib. med schools aren't very competitive, but what about ones from other countries?

gotmd?
09-04-2011, 04:55 PM
Great thank you so much! I just looked into Atlantic Bridge- seems awesome! 3 med schools that will accept high school applicants, time for me to do research! Now, I must say something that might not seem very good. My high school GPA (unweighted) is 2.91. I know its very low, but this year, my grades are all A's. Plus, I have taken the hardest classes my school has to offer. I am the President of a club at my school that is of Science and academic value, and am in many clubs and activities related to science, volunteer at the hospital, and am enrolled in 4 medical classes this year. If I have really good teacher recs, do you think I have a shot at any 6 year program? I know you're not an interviewer or Dean, but do you think I could compete for a spot at a 6 year program?

devildoc8404
09-04-2011, 05:05 PM
I'm not studying in Ireland, so I'd have no idea. I would say contact them and apply. Also look at some other options for backup in the EU.

Good luck, it sounds like you are on the right track.

I did just note that you listed UWI above, which is a legit post-HS program... but I don't think that they accept a lot of foreign students there who are not from the West Indies.

gotmd?
09-04-2011, 06:19 PM
Aright will do! I saw that some Carib. med schools say they are accredited, but when I looked on the Medical Board of California website, they aren't there? Examples include Caribbean Medical University at Caracao, and Avalon at Caracao as well. Are they just frauds? CMU just opened in 2007 so I don't know if that makes a difference or not. Thanks for your help!

Tipton
09-04-2011, 07:05 PM
If you want to practice in CA, yeah. Don't go there. But why go to the Caribbean at all out of high school?!? You can go to a Carib school after college after exhausting your options of gaining admission to a US school.

CMUDean
09-09-2011, 09:38 AM
I agree with devildoc on the recommendation to avoid medical programs right after high school unless it is in a country that always does that. There are some US universities which can give you a 7-year program to get a bachelor's and MD- I only did a brief search and found Drew University's partnership with UMDNJ-NJMS in New Jersey for a BA/MD in 7 years. St. George also has a 7 year program. I have also posted in the past about other options for practicing in California in case you are unable to get into a California-approved school including working for the federal government (VA, military, Bureau of Indian Affairs, National Health Service Corps), which bypasses California licensing or working for a while in another state and applying for a faculty position at a California medical school- this would allow the school to request a license for you restricted to the university affiliated hospitals and clinics. I would recommend trying some of the prerequisite classes at a university before you make a large financial commitment because medical school is much harder than undergrad and even if you go to an easy school you will still have to pass very difficult licensing exams!

Scott1981
09-10-2011, 07:14 AM
working for a while in another state and applying for a faculty position at a California medical school- this would allow the school to request a license for you restricted to the university affiliated hospitals and clinics.

stop posting rumors. this is NOT true. this is the second time you posted this and it is completely false information.

CMUDean
09-10-2011, 03:05 PM
Moderator, please contact the Medical Board of California or at least follow this link. This is a recent change- I believe 2009 or 2010. I apologize for not including the proper link to the Medical Board of California page which specifically mentions this: Welcome to the Medical Board of California - Special Faculty Permit under Section 2168 of the Business and Professions Code (http://www.mbc.ca.gov/special_faculty.html)
as far as working for federal government, that is something that should be well documented with any of the federal agencies which hire physicians- they all require you to have a license in any state and then you can work for a federal agency in any state.

CMUDean
09-11-2011, 07:41 AM
Please note that the California faculty license path is NOT easy because you need to be "eminent in your field" so try other options first and then you would need to build a strong reputation through research and publications.

Scott1981
09-11-2011, 05:33 PM
Moderator, please contact the Medical Board of California or at least follow this link. This is a recent change- I believe 2009 or 2010. I apologize for not including the proper link to the Medical Board of California page which specifically mentions this: Welcome to the Medical Board of California - Special Faculty Permit under Section 2168 of the Business and Professions Code (http://www.mbc.ca.gov/special_faculty.html)
as far as working for federal government, that is something that should be well documented with any of the federal agencies which hire physicians- they all require you to have a license in any state and then you can work for a federal agency in any state.

well, that may be the case if you graduated from a school in lets say japan (one that is actually ON the california approval list). the reason a foreign grad would need to go through this path is simple.
1. they are "recognized as academically eminent in his or her field of specialty by the Medical Board of California"
2. they went to a school that is ON the california approved list as pretty much most domicile schools are
3. they did NOT complete an acgme residency which would for all practical purposes, bar them from getting a license in the first place.

the reality is..... even in the rare event that somebody from one of the lower tier unapproved california medical schools became a world renown leader in a particular field (one that would have had a california medical school recruit them to be a faculty)...... not being on the approved list would strike out their application for a special faculty permit.

once again, this works well for a physician from japan that is a cutting edge leader in transplant surgery who did not complete an acgme residency which in turn would make them ineligible for a california medical license going through the normal channels.

that is most likely the reason for this loophole. this is how i interpreted the rules for this special permit. i will email the representative to get an official response just to confirm and will post the response.

devildoc8404
09-11-2011, 06:10 PM
There are other states with similar licensing options for foreign-trained medical faculty (South Carolina jumps to mind), but as I read it, this is not a kind of loophole to avoid the approval of the medical school. Rather, as Dr. Scott suggests in his Japanese hypothetical, it is used as a pathway for a physician who completed residency overseas and would otherwise be considered ineligible for licensing in most states without re-completing his/her residency training. If a physician is already considered "eminent" enough to be recruited to teach/research at a medical school, then there is really no reason for him/her to do residency all over again, is there? The scope of practice, as noted above, is limited to the medical schools' affiliated hospitals.

Be reasonable, here... this license is for heavy-hitters. It isn't going to be a method that Dr. Schmuckatelli can use to sidle his/her way into California (or South Carolina, or wherever else) after graduating from Saint Coconuts' School of Refrigerator Repair and Medical College.

The federal option still stands, assuming a non-CMB-approved grad can score a job with the military, the VA, or some other federal agency under the auspices of another state's medical license... but again, the scope of practice is strictly limited to within the federal facilities.

Tipton
09-11-2011, 07:09 PM
The point is: don't place ANY hope of practicing medicine in CA without graduating from a CA-Approved medical school.

med209
09-11-2011, 08:53 PM
The point is: don't place ANY hope of practicing medicine in CA without graduating from a CA-Approved medical school.

So go to a one that is already approved or wait till it gets the approval

Scott1981
09-14-2011, 08:06 AM
just an update, the california board representative is out of his office until sept 20th. i will follow up when he gets back.

scottwb
07-01-2012, 04:50 PM
I will be entering my junior year of HS in the fall and I am investigating medical schools which accept high performing HS students. From the earlier posts it appears other countries have such programs. I prefer to study medicine in the US. Does anyone know of US schools which accept exceptional HS graduates into their program? I would greatly appreciate any suggestions. Thanks.

devildoc8404
07-01-2012, 05:17 PM
That exact option does not exist in the United States, no.

However, there are US programs (both MD and DO) that integrate undergrad and medical school together into a 7-year package. If you are accepted, you are guaranteed a seat in the medical school as long as you complete your undergrad requirements while maintaining a specific GPA and achieving a specific minimum MCAT score. I personally know people who have completed these types of programs at Boston University (MD) and University of New England (DO), and it's a very interesting option. Look around a bit on the internet, as there are a number of options like this if you are a high-achieving high school student.

Good luck to you.

09invest
08-16-2013, 09:16 PM
please I am a high school graduate from Africa, I just got into American University of St Vincent is a new school, please what's the chance of we the students to get a residence in the States? I did read something online which said residency spots in the USA is very limited therefore before a student( an IMG) can get a residence his/her medical school must have been around for more than 10 years. Please how true is this? Also can a student from AUS apply for residency in the top US hospitals like Mayo clinic, Massachusetts General Hospital etc? And any advice?

P.S it's too late now 'cause I've paid my tuition and housing fees.

Thank you.

Summer2013
08-16-2013, 10:19 PM
This is an interesting topic. However there are other ways to get into medical school right out of high school. I have 3 daughters. My older one is 20 and Senior in US college now getting ready to take MCAT and hopefully get into med school next year. As I was searching ways to help my daughter, I my self ended up joining medical school. I am an MD3 student in Caribbean Medical School. After doing exhaustive research, I started training and prepping my Twin 14 year old girls to accumulate enough college credit hours by CLEP exams and AP and eStart credits enough to get a college degree the day they graduate from high school and skip college and go straight to med school. Worst case may be do a 1 year college and then get to med school. They already have 27 college credits at the age 13 and I am sure by the time they finish high school they will have 120+ credit hours required to get college degree. They already took SAT and scored 1820 at the age 13 and I am hoping they will take it again and score at least 2200 - 2300 this time. I am prepping them to take the MACT during their Junior Year in High school and beat the scores to get into med school. Even if every thing does not happen the way I hope at least they will have much better competitive edge over other kids in the school and most important avoid $150k - $200k student loans to get through college. That is what I have spent my older daughter putting through 4 year college in US. My suggestion, is do not follow the path blindly. Choose the options and look around. If you are smart you can find the ways to get ahead. In the end being a Doctor is just not a degree, this is also helping people who are in the need. I do not believe in the educational system that is getting students into hundreds of thousands of student loan debt that they have to carry for good part of their adult life. Be smart and look around and see how you can beat the system and get ahead.

whodatgirl
08-21-2013, 01:25 AM
why not go to college first? and experience

Summer2013
08-21-2013, 07:17 AM
why not go to college first? and experience
Experience is good. But it will cost $200k for four years of college and another $250k for 4 years of med school. By the time one pays all these student loans with interest for the rest of their lives is not fun. If one can save money it is always good. Start out life with no debt or very little debt.







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