PDA

View Full Version : Advice for transitioning from UK to US clinicals



Slaol
06-12-2011, 11:34 AM
After I finish my UK cores in August, I will be starting at Providence in September for my elective rotations.

Is there any advice from previous students on how to best transition from UK to US clinical rotations? What part of the adjustment did you find easiest? Most difficult?

Any advice/comments would be appreciated. :cool:

shwin
06-12-2011, 12:33 PM
I did a few rotations in the US before going to the UK, so hopefully you'll find my input helpful:

First off, much more is expected of you as a student in the US. You'll be functioning more along the lines of an F1 or F2- you'll probably be the best source of info on the patients you follow, will be performing much more scut, etc. The hours are worse in general, and don't think about having a personal day like is oh so common here in england.

Units are completely different, but you're probably familiar with the US reference ranges from basic sciences. And breaking news: you'll never hear "I weigh ___ stone" again. Pronunciations are different also, (tray-kee-uh v. truh-kee-uh, kephalsporins) but i doubt youll have any problem there.

EMR are much more prevalent in America, which I find is a huge bonus. It's easier and more convenient all around.

CT is always the right answer, just how it's always the wrong answer in England. You'll probably be able to teach several people some new PE maneuvers you picked up in England.

There are more scheduled didactics in general.

Bring your white coat.

Hope this helps.

Slaol
06-13-2011, 01:03 AM
Very helpful, thanks!

AUCMD2012
06-13-2011, 12:59 PM
I did a few rotations in the US before going to the UK, so hopefully you'll find my input helpful:

First off, much more is expected of you as a student in the US. You'll be functioning more along the lines of an F1 or F2- you'll probably be the best source of info on the patients you follow, will be performing much more scut, etc. The hours are worse in general, and don't think about having a personal day like is oh so common here in england.

Units are completely different, but you're probably familiar with the US reference ranges from basic sciences. And breaking news: you'll never hear "I weigh ___ stone" again. Pronunciations are different also, (tray-kee-uh v. truh-kee-uh, kephalsporins) but i doubt youll have any problem there.

EMR are much more prevalent in America, which I find is a huge bonus. It's easier and more convenient all around.

CT is always the right answer, just how it's always the wrong answer in England. You'll probably be able to teach several people some new PE maneuvers you picked up in England.

There are more scheduled didactics in general.

Bring your white coat.

Hope this helps.

UK / USA

FBC / CBC
U&E / comprehensive metabolic panel (includes bicarb, chloride, glucose)
BM / Blood Glucose

sandyjay
07-06-2011, 10:57 AM
After I finish my UK cores in August, I will be starting at Providence in September for my elective rotations.

Is there any advice from previous students on how to best transition from UK to US clinical rotations? What part of the adjustment did you find easiest? Most difficult?

Any advice/comments would be appreciated. :cool:

Enjoyed all your posts on the UK clinical experiences. As you come to the end of your stay could you please sum up your total experience especially your preparation for step2? It would be so helpful for us all who are about to start clinicals in the UK? i remember you stating in one or two of your posts that you attended sessions with F1 and F2 Interns.

Thank you and all the best.

bookite
07-06-2011, 09:10 PM
Work hard, get your LORs and enjoy your fourth year electives as it's almost over (or about to start, depends on where your looking from). Make sure you know the format for the H and P we do over here. The medicine is similar the time in the hospital is longer.

Good Luck.

Lem
07-06-2011, 10:00 PM
Things that I've gathered from UK students "adjusting" to the US system.

1. We read Journals/Publications/Evidenced Based medicine, sometimes everyday depending on the specialty
2. Lot's of "scut" aka drawing labs, social work, getting things done
3. You don't get personal days and call can be till 7pm but you don't really leave until the resident lets you go home.
4. 24 hour call is real lol

Slaol
07-08-2011, 02:09 AM
Enjoyed all your posts on the UK clinical experiences. As you come to the end of your stay could you please sum up your total experience especially your preparation for step2? It would be so helpful for us all who are about to start clinicals in the UK? i remember you stating in one or two of your posts that you attended sessions with F1 and F2 Interns.

Thank you and all the best.

I'm currently finishing up the last of my cores in the UK (Psych). Here's a nutshell Pros/Cons list I've come up with. Others can chip in if they agree, or disagree with what I have put:

PROS:
Virtually no scut work
The majority of on-calls are voluntary
Apart from Peds and OB/GYN, no weekends that aren't voluntary
I've been paired with a Consultant (Attending) directly in all my rotations
UK Physical examination teaching/skills are more thorough than US, IMO
Hospital is very student-friendly and promotes hands-on learning
Opportunity for travel
Exposure to a lot of pathology



CONS:
Having to travel to London to take shelf exams
No SOAP notes in UK... potential disadvantage when going back to US
Rotating with UK students can be frustrating sometimes (they never show up for anything & seem to always complain)
The weather
Cost of living
Sometimes the schedule for students is very vague - difficult to know what is expected unless you specifically ask


As for Step 2 study, I am doing the Doctors in Training Course for Step 2 CK in the evenings and weekends. My wife is helping me go through some cases for CS. I am scheduled to take my exams at the end of August, when I go back to the States.

Hope this helps.

AUCMD2012
07-08-2011, 09:48 AM
I'm currently finishing up the last of my cores in the UK (Psych). Here's a nutshell Pros/Cons list I've come up with. Others can chip in if they agree, or disagree with what I have put:

PROS:
Virtually no scut work
The majority of on-calls are voluntary
Apart from Peds and OB/GYN, no weekends that aren't voluntary
I've been paired with a Consultant (Attending) directly in all my rotations
UK Physical examination teaching/skills are more thorough than US, IMO
Hospital is very student-friendly and promotes hands-on learning
Opportunity for travel
Exposure to a lot of pathology



CONS:
Having to travel to London to take shelf exams
No SOAP notes in UK... potential disadvantage when going back to US
Rotating with UK students can be frustrating sometimes (they never show up for anything & seem to always complain)
The weather
Cost of living
Sometimes the schedule for students is very vague - difficult to know what is expected unless you specifically ask


As for Step 2 study, I am doing the Doctors in Training Course for Step 2 CK in the evenings and weekends. My wife is helping me go through some cases for CS. I am scheduled to take my exams at the end of August, when I go back to the States.

Hope this helps.

Must have been nice to be paired with a consultant.

There are definitely more didactic teaching sessions in the states and the schedule is much more organized. You also get "Exposure to a lot of pathology" in the states; as the population of the USA is 6X more than the UK.

I've written a good number of SOAP notes :D

Slaol
07-08-2011, 03:40 PM
Must have been nice to be paired with a consultant.

I thought it was common for AUC students to be paired with consultants in the UK?

AUCMD2012
07-08-2011, 07:31 PM
I thought it was common for AUC students to be paired with consultants in the UK?

Must only apply to hospitals north of Manchester...

Slaol
07-10-2011, 06:12 PM
Must only apply to hospitals north of Manchester...

Perhaps. I guess it's a tradeoff for being in East Lancashire.

AUCMD2012
07-10-2011, 07:08 PM
Perhaps. I guess it's a tradeoff for being in East Lancashire.

No reason in particular...







Copyright © 2003-2018 ValueMD, LLC. All rights reserved.