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View Full Version : info about Ross..good or bad?



aolinger
03-20-2011, 09:57 PM
I have always heard great things about Ross vet med, but I heard from someone in the med school say some pretty negative things about the med school. Is it true that
1. if you fail 1 class, you have to take the entire semester over again…which totally racks up the cost of tuition over your 4 years and if you fail 2x you get kicked out??
2. When exactly do you do your licensing exam? I thought you went to the US to do your clincal year, then took the exam towards the end. Do you do your clinical year and then have to do another clinical semester?
3. Do you have to take a comprehensive exam before licensing exam, that you have 3 x to pass or get kicked out of Ross?

medic300107
03-21-2011, 08:54 AM
if you are asking about the med school why post in the vet school forum?

1) yes true, although if you fail 2x you probably shouldn't be in med school anymore. Most US Med schools will kick you out if you decel 2x.
2) There are 3 parts to licensing exams Step 1, 2 (2 parts clinical knowledge and clinical skills), 3.
Step 1 after 2nd year, must pass to go into clinicals. Step 2 CK and CS passed to graduate. Step 3 to get a full license, can be done before residency but has to be done by end of 1st year of residency.
3) See above
4) You take a "Comp" for the basic sciences (covers 1st 2 yrs) that you must pass to get a scheduling permit for Step 1. If you fail Comp it means you would most likely fail the Step 1, which looks bad on the school's pass rates. you fail comp 3x and kicked out yes. However, much much better to find out you failed comp than to sit for the step and fail even once. Again if you fail 3x you either didn't learn what you needed to in Basic sciences or you need to learn to study a lot more/better for step. it's no joke, that exam determines most residency opportunities.

aolinger
03-21-2011, 07:28 PM
oh okay, thank you for your help. No, I was wondering about Vet med...but the only person I know who has gone to ross is in the Med program, so she is who I have been getting a lot of my questions answered from. I didnt know if it was the same for both vet med and regular med. Apparently it is

sisyphus
03-21-2011, 11:39 PM
Firstly, I went to SGU and can't answer some of your questions...but I can help with some too.


1. if you fail 1 class, you have to take the entire semester over again…which totally racks up the cost of tuition over your 4 years and if you fail 2x you get kicked out??

Not sure on this one (again, went to SGU) but sounds about right.


2. When exactly do you do your licensing exam? I thought you went to the US to do your clincal year, then took the exam towards the end. Do you do your clinical year and then have to do another clinical semester?

I can answer this for you. Since you'll be going to vet school outside the US and at a school which is not accredited by the AVMA, you'll have to pass either the PAVE or the ECFVG IN ADDITION TO the North American Veterinary Licensing Exam (NAVLE) to get a license to practice. The PAVE exam is taken at the end of your 3rd year (or, technically 2.5 year for Ross since you go year-round) but is not accepted in every state. The ECFVG is taken no earlier than 3 months AFTER you graduate (i.e. after clinical year) but is acceptable everywhere. I started and kind of abandoned this thread on my experiences with links to more info. (http://www.valuemd.com/veterinary-medicine/157547-ecfvg.html) Some info on the thread may be a little outdated as far as the details and such.

No matter whether you choose the PAVE or ECFVG you'll do your 2.5 years in St. Kitts then do your clinical year at a US school or wherever they have affiliates.


3. Do you have to take a comprehensive exam before licensing exam, that you have 3 x to pass or get kicked out of Ross?

No idea.

aolinger
03-22-2011, 12:04 AM
Two weeks ago, Ross was fully accredited by the US and for the class of 2015, we dont have to take the PAVE exam anymore....we only have to take the NAVLE now. At SGU, is it the same kind of situation...that if you fail a class, you have to retake the whole semester?

sisyphus
03-22-2011, 01:43 AM
Two weeks ago, Ross was fully accredited by the US and for the class of 2015, we dont have to take the PAVE exam anymore....we only have to take the NAVLE now. At SGU, is it the same kind of situation...that if you fail a class, you have to retake the whole semester?

Wow, that's great. SGU is apparently getting their official AVMA site visit soon. Can't remember the details, though.

At SGU, if you fail a class you have to repeat all or part of that semester. If you fail that class again or a different class, you're out. When I was there it was called 'decel'...that is decelerating so that you take a lighter load in the short term. There was a pretty good support structure in place for students in this situation, or at least there seemed to be. I don't think they want you to fail out, but quite a few did. About 10-15% of my class had to decel and maybe 5-8% of those ended up failing out.

At least one that I knew of tried again at SMU but never heard if that person was successful there or not.

medic300107
03-22-2011, 10:28 AM
my responses were in reply to the MD program, i have no clue about the DVM program

aolinger
03-22-2011, 01:11 PM
How was SGU? I had an interview back in January, but I still have no heard back from them. I was a little turned off by them, because when I went to the information seminar, the person doing the talk was a representative for the med school and made it seem like SGU did not care too much about the vet school. He pretty much just talked about how much $ they put into the campus and how great the Med school was. I wasnt really into it.
See, i'm having issues, becuase I also got into Western In Pomona CA. But I really did not like their campus, or their problem based learning teaching style. So I have been pretty set on Ross.

sisyphus
03-22-2011, 08:30 PM
How was SGU? I had an interview back in January, but I still have no heard back from them. I was a little turned off by them, because when I went to the information seminar, the person doing the talk was a representative for the med school and made it seem like SGU did not care too much about the vet school. He pretty much just talked about how much $ they put into the campus and how great the Med school was. I wasnt really into it.
See, i'm having issues, becuase I also got into Western In Pomona CA. But I really did not like their campus, or their problem based learning teaching style. So I have been pretty set on Ross.

I liked SGU and felt well prepared. Undoubtedly you'll feel the same about Ross. I was with some Rossies during my clinical year and they did well too.

I never went to any of the info seminars. Perhaps that was a good thing. The med program is very, very well established. The vet program is still establishing itself...even after about 10 years.

Before Ross became accredited I would've strongly advised to go to Western but obviously now that isn't a factor. I would, however, strongly recommend looking into relative costs and total loan amounts once you graduate. The cost of vet school can be KILLER. I do ok...but would be much, much happier without 2 hundred thousand in loans.

I know Cornell tried the problem based style a few years back but heard terrible things about it...and that was from a couple of the vet faculty.

aolinger
03-22-2011, 09:56 PM
yeah, Vet school is very expensive. But comparing the all around cost of tuition and housing, ect, Western is about $20,000 more expensive than Ross....that is, granted you dont have to repeat any semesters at Ross. I am excited for the experience of going away to school, and getting to hopefully work with some exotic species that I couldn't work with in the US. I am a little nervous as well!

bpogue
08-09-2011, 09:13 AM
Ross is a decent school if you don't want to specialize, other carrib schools not so much- can be hard to get a good internship and after that a (competitive) residency if you go to an offshore school. Not (usually) because the students are less smart, but the quality of offshore education is not to the level of most US schools. The clinicians at the US schools are the ones who will be writing you letters of recommendation and if they perceive you to have a lower knowledge base, that can really hurt your chances. Now, there are plenty of people - mostly from Ross - that are successful and go on to specialize, but you do fight a bit of an uphill battle. So be careful what you get in to. If you are comfortable with the amount of money you are about to spend for possibly a lower grade education, then go to an offshore school. If not, then it's always better to wait a year or two, improve your application and go to a US school.







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