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medor
10-29-2010, 12:51 PM
hello

why there is a need to distinguish the subtype of osmotic pressured from proteints, called "oncotic pressure or colloid osmotic pressure" ?

also, why does a carbohydrate solution has osmotic pressure, since carbohydrates cross freely intestine membrane?

thanks

medor
11-03-2010, 03:35 PM
anyone???????

Dr. Mixmasta
11-10-2010, 01:41 PM
Well, in many books its basically the same, some use oncotic pressure and others colloid osmotic pressure, what u really need to have clear is the basics u can visualize it was the force of a "solute" thats gonna oppose the hydrostatic force of the "solution". Thats why carbohydrates have oncotic pressure bc they are the "solute" and the plasma is the solution, and both forces would be opposite, this opposition of forces establishes the total pressure. :D

Hope this helped

Mixmasta MD

medor
11-12-2010, 01:47 PM
I didn't ask the difference between colloid osmotic pressure and oncotic pressure, I know it's the same

neither I asked about what it is, which I know as well

I asked something else

Dr. Mixmasta
11-13-2010, 03:41 PM
"why there is a need to distinguish the subtype of osmotic pressured from proteints, called "oncotic pressure or colloid osmotic pressure" ?"

Ans:For Step 1 there is no need

Why does a carbohydrate solution has osmotic pressure, since carbohydrates cross freely intestine membrane?

Ans: I explained this one bc , one thing is the osmotic pressure that carbohydrates, which is a factor for it to cross but not the only one.
Ex: concentration gradient, electrical gradient,etc.

medor
11-13-2010, 04:51 PM
there is no need, but they distinguish them! i bet there must be some need!

AbiDiff
03-17-2011, 01:27 PM
It's important to distinguish between them when considering the impact of IV fluids. If you gave someone a regular saline drip, their osmotic pressure would remain the same, however, due to the lower concentration of blood proteins, their oncotic pressure would drop, which could lead to oedema. Hope that helps :)

mtreece
05-06-2013, 02:08 PM
For an in depth discussion of this osmotic pressure, hydrostatic pressure, and electrical/chemical gradients, check out Physiology:Custom-Designed Chemistry by M. Thompson Reece at Amazon books.







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