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sydney
07-08-2004, 10:40 AM
Could someone tell me what the quality of the online basics sciences program is and how accepted is it from the US medical associations, hospitals, and residency system?

jguru2
07-08-2004, 11:05 AM
stay away from online (medical) programs...

azskeptic
07-08-2004, 11:44 AM
Could someone tell me what the quality of the online basics sciences program is and how accepted is it from the US medical associations, hospitals, and residency system?

Indeed fully online programs will end up with you having a degree you can't license........

az skeptic

IMG X-Files
07-09-2004, 12:43 AM
Med students learn interaction with patients from 2nd year in medical school, that can never be replaced with online learning. Online learning is an adjunct to traditional learning. Clerkship, together with online learning is a great idea, only as an adjunct !!!. For schools offering online learning as a primary, can not get their graduates proper licensure requirements. Online learning together with attendance and FULL clerkship, of 2 years. 36 months should be the minimum standard for any MD degree, where 24 months should be allocated to patient's observations under clinical settings, in conjunction to academia.
Hope this helps,

sydney
07-09-2004, 01:02 PM
Thanks for your information, but isn't the USMLE Step 1 the great equalizer and if you can pass it and pass it with a good score wouldn't that allow you to get into clinical rotations and then residency and of course licensure?

soon2bMS
07-12-2004, 11:23 AM
Could someone tell me what the quality of the online basics sciences program is and how accepted is it from the US medical associations, hospitals, and residency system?

I'm not a student at IUHS but I am taking my basic sciences online. It is true that some states are against any portion of your medical education online. There are medical students and people who feel that you can't learn medicine online. That's just what they think. No one can tell you how you learn and the way you should learn. Alot of this has to do with history's Diploma Mill which are known to give advanced credit for life experience's unrelated to medicine and medical schools which don't have a campus or physical location. As a result, many states have either banned or shun any medical school that has an online program.

However, as time goes by, many schools are incorporating techonology into their curriculum. Today, many medical schools are doing away with cadavers and putting anatomy online for their students. Students are now able to download powerpoints on lectures without having to go to class. There are medical school's that are strictly PBL. Some medical schools from the first day of class put their students in patient contact while other's will not let you near a patient until your 3rd and 4th year of school. I know plenty of medical student who spend the majority of their time studying from notes and other resources rather than attending class only going for the first few days of class or attending those classes which are mandatory for them to attend.

As it stands right now, distance learning is becoming more active in many medical schools and schools across the nation, though few have gone so far to allow students to do their entire basic sciences online. The few schools that have done so, are the laughing stock for the medical community and those who feel you can't learn from reading. This explains why most students who choose this route stay away from forums like this. Since there are 3 medical schools that offer this distance learning approach to medicine, there are hundreds of student taking this different, unusal route to learning medicine. Yet you don't hear from most of them. Then again why should you when they are the laughing stock of the medical community. What point would it be for them to post on this site or other medical student site only to be shunned. You soon learn not to go where your not welcomed.

As far as state licensing is concerned, as I said before, there are some states which have banned any medical graduate from licensure if they have taken this route. Then there are some states which don't really care as long as you pass the boards. The decision to attend one of these schools has to be made on the account of how important it is for the individual to have freedom of movement because you will be limited in terms of where you can become licensed. You also have to be willing to be shunned and made to feel incompetent by some people. This will become less and less over time, but right now, it's still the beginning.

I personally know students who are in residency right now after completing their basic science online, not just in the US but aboard as well. They have no problem and have yet to be turn away by a patient saying that they would not want a doctor who did their basic sciences online. Reality of the situation, most don't care as long as your a competent physician. That's what matters in the end. Not how you learned. Then again, you have patients who won't let a medical student come near them nor will they allow a MD to work on them. I know lots of people who use Allopathic medicine as a last resort. I've worked with people who will not go to an Allopathic physician and would only see a D.O. or ND (Naturopathic Physician).

I will not sit here and tell you what a PD is looking for because I don't know what a PD looks for in an applicant. I'm sure it's more than what school you went to or how you learned your basic sciences. I doubt that anyone one this board is a PD in a residency program who can say that you won't get a residency. Even if they were, they can only speak for their own program not for all programs. Same with licensure laws. One state can only speak for their own state laws and rules, not every state. If one state will not accept you, then there are others whom may.

If all this sounds like too much work, then you should go to a medical school where there is less hostility. There are plenty which you wont have to go through this hassle. In the end, you must weigh your own situation to the issue. You have to be willing to face what comes with making that decision. Took me a while to learn this. But at some point you have to forget what others are saying and make it happen. Make them the liar.

Lastly, I like to point out that some try to make distant learning out to be something it's not. You can't complete 4yrs of medical school in 2yrs. You can't do your entire medical education online. You still have to do your 3rd and 4th year just as any other medical student. You still have to pass the USMLE and perhaps other test as well before becoming licensed to practice medicine. You still have to put in the hours of study just as any other medical student or it will show on the board exams the quality of education you recieved. And, it takes lot more dedication and sometimes time to do your medical education through distant learning. By no means is this an easy route to becoming a physician. You have be disciplined enough to study and complete your lessons on time. If you have taken a distant learning course in college, then you should know what I'm talking about. I took a couple of classes in college which were distant learning and I found it much harder than knowing you have a class at 8am which you must attend. You must be disiciplined enough to set time aside for study, review and exams. If you think this is a pie in the sky, then I would advise you to take a distant learning CME course and use that as a judgement of what the first 2yrs of medicine through distant learning is like.

Good luck

wolfvgang22
07-12-2004, 04:06 PM
If you really want to get licensed without more headaches than necessary, it's probably a good idea to avoid internet schools for the time being.
(an understatement, I'm sure)

soon2bMS
07-13-2004, 09:00 PM
If you really want to get licensed without more headaches than necessary, it's probably a good idea to avoid internet schools for the time being.
(an understatement, I'm sure)

Perhaps this is true if you go to a state which prohibts such schools, but for those that don't, you'll have no problem.

If I did a law degree online and tried to go anywhere but california, I would have problems since california is the only state that allows people to do law degrees online. See my point.

Since I have no desire to work in the states which prohibt me from becoming licensed, then I will have no problems with getting licensed. Not everyone want to have the ability to move all over the US. I'm happy where I live and have no plans on moving to another state. You may think this sucks but that's you. I have no need to be able to be licensed in all 50 states nor do I wish to be licensed in all 50 states. Does this limit me? Sure it does in terms of moving out of my state, but I have a whole state that has no such law which many of you continue to try to make exist when it doesn't. I have no desire to be in a competitive residency program so I have no worries here. My goal is to work in IM and subspecialize in Nutrition. The medical school that I attend will get me there. The state I live in has no law which prohibts my medical school nor the way I study to become a physician, so who really has the issue here? It sure isn't me because I'm making my dream come true and I'm not the one on this site trying to bring someone else's dream down because I don't agree with the way they are learning medicine.

Again, think as you will people....I'm making my dream come true rather you agree or don't agree...and this is becoming really boring having to defend my decision....I wonder why I keep coming to these forum.

alibak
07-13-2004, 10:07 PM
Hi, I was wondering if you could please tell me which are the 3 online med programs that you mentioned since I'm truly interested in finding more about it.
are there only 3? or more? please give me the names if you could.
please reply. thanks.

wolfvgang22
07-13-2004, 10:32 PM
If you really want to get licensed without more headaches than necessary, it's probably a good idea to avoid internet schools for the time being.
(an understatement, I'm sure)

Perhaps this is true if you go to a state which prohibts such schools, but for those that don't, you'll have no problem.

If I did a law degree online and tried to go anywhere but california, I would have problems since california is the only state that allows people to do law degrees online. See my point.

Since I have no desire to work in the states which prohibt me from becoming licensed, then I will have no problems with getting licensed. Not everyone want to have the ability to move all over the US. I'm happy where I live and have no plans on moving to another state. You may think this sucks but that's you. I have no need to be able to be licensed in all 50 states nor do I wish to be licensed in all 50 states. Does this limit me? Sure it does in terms of moving out of my state, but I have a whole state that has no such law which many of you continue to try to make exist when it doesn't. I have no desire to be in a competitive residency program so I have no worries here. My goal is to work in IM and subspecialize in Nutrition. The medical school that I attend will get me there. The state I live in has no law which prohibts my medical school nor the way I study to become a physician, so who really has the issue here? It sure isn't me because I'm making my dream come true and I'm not the one on this site trying to bring someone else's dream down because I don't agree with the way they are learning medicine.

Again, think as you will people....I'm making my dream come true rather you agree or don't agree...and this is becoming really boring having to defend my decision....I wonder why I keep coming to these forum.

Ok then. Give us a list of licensed grads from IUHS or any other foreign internet med school, and the states that have allowed such licensures. I have a $2 wager to lose if you can. (I'll call the state boards to check.)

But even if you can:

My point is that internet schooling is really new in medicine, and anyone who goes that route might have to "take one for the team" to the tune of $100,000+ to find out if licensure can be obtained that way. So if that's cool with you, more power to ya.

Bottom line:

Prospective students should look to see the USMLE pass rate of schools they are interested in first, second the percentage of the class that graduated with their class and passed the USMLE, and third the number of grads that got licensed in the states out of those who passed.

Check with the medical boards in the states you might practice in to see what the rules for licensure are, and if your school can help you meet those expectations. And don't forget that when you participate in the Match, you might need to go to another state to get the job you want.

Finally:
Don't believe everything you read. (Except my sig below.)

IUHS student
07-14-2004, 06:13 PM
online program...
Let me tell you, it sucked the day I enter IUHS and it continues to suck. The online students are required to come on campus for one month for some reason I donít know. And the sad part if they are so disappointed with their education when they look at our education on campus. Most on line students are working in the medical field and they are telling us that they can not do it online. They feel alone and get no directions most of the time. I was an on campus student but in my opinion the online program is worse than the on campus and that is BAD.
If you are looking into iuhs the questions to ask are:
How many students ON CAMPUS?
How many teachers full time teachers ON CAMPUS?
How long are classes?
How many students were part of the incoming class last year and how many are still there?
The on campus program is lacking so what you know the online is not going to be any better.. Look into the school before you make a decision.
I dont know how long the school will last. Dont believe anything they say. Look in to everything they tell you. Good luck...

stephew
07-14-2004, 08:38 PM
Thanks for your information, but isn't the USMLE Step 1 the great equalizer ?lord no. whoever told you that is a living example of a little learning is a dangerous thing. For medicine, there is no little learning you can get away with.

lwstokes
07-15-2004, 10:29 PM
Hi,
Can you provide me with the names of the programs that are considered to be online and which residency programs matched their graduates.

thanks,

*****

IMG X-Files
07-19-2004, 07:19 PM
Online learning is not something new, by the year 2007, most medical schools in the world will offer online learning as part as the curriculum. However, online learning should be part of the medical school program, not entirely it !
Most state boards and hospitals do not really care if your curriculum encompass medical online learning, if you do an online search you will soon find that most IV schools have online learning component as well..

soon2bMS
07-19-2004, 07:57 PM
One cannot do an entire medical program online. We're talking basic science here people. That's not the entire medical education.

One can argue that one cannot learn basic science online. However, this is just what people think. There are plenty of medical school that are starting to use online programs and PBL to revolutionize medical education. Many school have done away with cadaver use and turned to online and cross sectional anatomy. At some school attendence to lectures are not mandatory and students can download lecture notes online or through powerpoint. How do I know? Students from SDN have said so. And, Harvard University and McMaster in Canada are doing it now.

What will determine if one can learn basic science online is the USMLE. I know people who has passed their USMLE step 1 after finishing Basic science online. I know students from my school who have passed USMLE step 2. And, I know students who are in Residency now from my school. Until I start to see people who have done online programs fail the USMLE, then I'll say that one can't learn basic science online. Until then, what people say is just what they think. That's ok. We are all allowed to think and feel as we may.

However, please stop saying that one can do their entire medical education online because one can't. If one does, then it is not a true medical school because most countries that I know about require you do some form of clinical experience which one cannot do online.

For those that say you can't do basic science online, prove me wrong. Show me some USMLE scores of those who have done their basic science online and failed and I will consider what you say as being fact.

inskeptical
08-01-2004, 12:22 PM
One cannot do an entire medical program online. We're talking basic science here people. That's not the entire medical education.

One can argue that one cannot learn basic science online. However, this is just what people think. There are plenty of medical school that are starting to use online programs and PBL to revolutionize medical education. Many school have done away with cadaver use and turned to online and cross sectional anatomy. At some school attendence to lectures are not mandatory and students can download lecture notes online or through powerpoint. How do I know? Students from SDN have said so. And, Harvard University and McMaster in Canada are doing it now.

What will determine if one can learn basic science online is the USMLE. I know people who has passed their USMLE step 1 after finishing Basic science online. I know students from my school who have passed USMLE step 2. And, I know students who are in Residency now from my school. Until I start to see people who have done online programs fail the USMLE, then I'll say that one can't learn basic science online. Until then, what people say is just what they think. That's ok. We are all allowed to think and feel as we may.

However, please stop saying that one can do their entire medical education online because one can't. If one does, then it is not a true medical school because most countries that I know about require you do some form of clinical experience which one cannot do online.

For those that say you can't do basic science online, prove me wrong. Show me some USMLE scores of those who have done their basic science online and failed and I will consider what you say as being fact.

Hi,

You appear to have researched the issue of online studies. I have spoken to a number of PDs; alot do not seem to care where you did your medical studies, mainly basic sciences. One point that was made to me is that one cannot truly determine the quality of education outside the US. So, most rely on the USMLE as a baseline for decision making.

When I was a perfusionist back in the late 70's and early 80's, I could still remember the severe ridicule inflicted upon Carribean med students, SGU and AUG. Then, shortly after these two schools, Ross came into the picture. It just seems like yesterday when many wanted these schools shut down. A friend of mine went through Cook County, family practice. Then, they were mainly older individuals; a number of these individuals had transferred between Carrib schools or went to South America. He actually went, initially to SGU, but transferred due to political climate. His attendings and residents gave him attitude on occasion; however, the most severe resistance came from people, who were outside the medical profession.

While most of the people here seem to give very good, sporadic rationals why online education should not be fully accepted. I have not yet reviewed a coherent argument against it; just as in the 70's and 80's, why the carribean schools could not be a viable alternative to US medical schools if one had multiple rejections or other disappointing circumstances. The rationals against basic sciences online are virtually identical to the past rationals against Carribean schools. For example, licensing and quality clinical exposure prior to the wards for the last two years of medical school. I still remember the primary objection by one PD against Carribean schools, that they lacked adequate clinicals. At the time, it was seen as suspicious that these off shore schools would cut their students loose after the basic sciences to hospitals in US clinical settings when most of the medical schools around the world have substantial clinical facilities. Even if they did get US clinicals, I witnessed so-called 'separate-but-equal wards". Also, I remember a non-medical advocate propose in the early 80's that a foreign-educated medical graduate be required to have most if not all of his/her clinical training be in the country where the medical school was located. He wanted to eliminate all Carribean schools. However, it seems that there are at least two moderators from AUG and SGU, who have been to quality residencies and are already or will be fully licensed.
Furthermore, I find it difficult to understand the resistance against acceptance of online studies for the first two years. There are a number of US medical schools that have incorporated this into their curriculum. For example, Harvard, Loyola, Northwestern, and Stanford. The trend in US medical basic sciences is to lower the class time hours. After reviewing the rate of innovation, it is a matter of time before the entire curriculum, basic sciences and some clinical procedures, will be online. One example, Northwestern University has a procedure in place where PBL sessions, anatomy and neuroscience lectures can be reviewed at a future date.
Again, I do not see all the issues against online studies. That really is for the self-appointed experts. However, I also never fully accepted the rationals against the Carribean schools in the past. I believe just as in the case of the Carribean schools; it is dependent on time and money before online basic sciences will be seen as an equally viable alternative. It is fundamentally the individual, who must take full responsibility for his education and career.

soon2bMS
08-02-2004, 01:49 PM
Thank you. I'm glad that I'm not the only one who recognizes this.

Just as you have pointed out, there is no hard evidence to support the claim that doing basic science online is less effective than attending lectures on campus. In fact, I have evidence to support the fact that you can learn basic science online. My evidence is the students from my school who have taken and passed the USMLE. If anyone wants to discount this, then we must also discount the reliability of having such a test at all because there is no seperate test given to medical students based upon the school they attended. A person who studied at Harvard must take the same exam that a person at IUHS must take. If the person from IUHS passes the USMLE, then there is no credit to say that his/her education was ineffective. What's left is only the opinion of others who say it can't be done.

Though I cannot speak for IUHS or other schools that do have basic science online, I have choosen a medical school who has the same curriculum as a US medical school, is an accredited medical school in Ghana/Liberia, has clinicals rotations in the country which it is located, has hospital affliations in it's own country where students can do residency, has a main campus, has faculty who are qualified to teach medicine, Students who have passed the USMLE, students in residency and clinicals in the US and is listed with ECFMG, WHO and IMED. Yet, there is a double standard because none of this matters since the medical boards in the US can overlook how well you've done on the USMLE, the schools medical curriculum or it's accreditation in the country it is located and use excuses that the schools medical library isn't big enough. So this makes you ineligible for licensure. What a joke. And our government allows this to take place!

I'm sure that there will always be skeptics out there. But the only skepticsim that we really should be concerned about is the USMLE, the medical boards freedom to discriminate, and medical schools who fail to turn out compentent physicians.

Good luck

Hopkinsboi
08-20-2004, 10:09 PM
I am coming into this forum a bit late but nevertheless the topic is interesting and seems to draw out polarized outlooks from both traditional and nontraditional perspectives.

Although at the present time I am personally reluctant to attempt tackling the online format choosing to alleviate some headaches in part because I am unwilling to cough up $68,000 only to be denied a chance to sit for the USMLE, I do have three friends that did in fact take the online path.

One was already a physician assistant here at Johns Hopkins. Upon completion of the MD program in the Carribean, he landed an internal medicine residency in Michigan. The two other friends as with myself were paramedics with a local fire department. One went to IUHS and is doing his clinical rotations now in NY. The other is currently an anesthesia resident at Yale University.

kypharm
03-09-2005, 07:21 PM
Hello. I'm new to this site. If you don't mind me asking, what school are you taking your online basic science courses at? I am interested in an online program but I am a little apprehensive due to potential licensure problems. Please let me know. Also, does anyone else know any other schools that offer the basic science portion online? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

azskeptic
03-09-2005, 07:27 PM
Hello. I'm new to this site. If you don't mind me asking, what school are you taking your online basic science courses at? I am interested in an online program but I am a little apprehensive due to potential licensure problems. Please let me know. Also, does anyone else know any other schools that offer the basic science portion online? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

she hasn't been on in a while but quit her online program (you can do a search) She states she is going to a college to get eligible to go to a real medical school.

JTP73
03-09-2005, 07:39 PM
Hello. I'm new to this site. If you don't mind me asking, what school are you taking your online basic science courses at? I am interested in an online program but I am a little apprehensive due to potential licensure problems. Please let me know. Also, does anyone else know any other schools that offer the basic science portion online? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

she hasn't been on in a while but quit her online program (you can do a search) She states she is going to a college to get eligible to go to a real medical school.

Say it again, please, azskeptic. I'm trying to follow your statement.

Picard
03-09-2005, 07:46 PM
It's one thing discussing the merrits of on-line education for medical school. It's quite another discussing what IUHS is doing. Yes, we can get into spirited debates about on-line education for part of basic science and the evolving technology that may make it very feasible in the future. Fine. However, what IUHS is doing is using this discussion/debate to sneak through it's useless/unethical programs.... programs that allow OMSF dentists to earn MD degrees in 18 months while continue to work as a dentist. Programs that allow chiropractors with no real medical trainings to earn MD degrees in 27 months while still working as a chiropractor... Or, granting advanced standing to nurses and PA's...

P

azskeptic
03-09-2005, 07:47 PM
Hello. I'm new to this site. If you don't mind me asking, what school are you taking your online basic science courses at? I am interested in an online program but I am a little apprehensive due to potential licensure problems. Please let me know. Also, does anyone else know any other schools that offer the basic science portion online? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

she hasn't been on in a while but quit her online program (you can do a search) She states she is going to a college to get eligible to go to a real medical school.

Say it again, please, azskeptic. I'm trying to follow your statement. The person addressed their question to soon2bms Soon2bms is going to a college right now to get herself ready to go to a real medical school, from the last report she posted here but she doesn't seem to monitor valuemd much anymore.....

caroline
12-07-2005, 06:55 PM
I totally agree that distance learning sucks! I tried it and I almost went insane. I got totally sick of being promised things and never getting them, sitting for hours alone reading through handouts which I'd printed off; trying not to feel bitter that I'd paid a few grand for them and finally, the constant slander and embarrassment that I received whenever I told anyone which medical school I was at. People look down on distance learning for one reason; the reason being that it doesn't constitute a medical degree. Its a way for corrupt people to bleed dry students desperate to study medicine. I say this only because I have spent so long trying to defend my university until I finally woke up and smelt the coffee... This is no way to sudy medicine. Run away and don't look back to online learning. There was a time when I would have done just about anything to become a doctor, but being ripped off really isn't worth it. Please people, do yourselves favours and learn from my mistake at least.

leadsled
12-11-2005, 06:00 PM
Thanks Caroline for your sincere and honest statement about online learning. It sounds like you would make a fine health care professional....I hope you will find a program suitable to your needs.

I believe it would be very difficult for one to gain a U.S. Residency after completing such a program. Sounds like you made the right choice!

Alternatives:
Have you exhausted all your options for admittance to a US MD or DO school?
Have you considered PA school?
Have you condsidered AA school?
Have you considered NP school?

DRJJ1
08-31-2006, 11:55 PM
Online Is Fine For Professionals For Kids Just Out Of Undergrad I Def Do Not Recomm,,,,,relaxxx Take The 3 Courses And Move To The Next Level,,you Think People Care Where You Went To School,,,they Don T So Relax

DRJJ1
08-31-2006, 11:58 PM
If you really want to get licensed without more headaches than necessary, it's probably a good idea to avoid internet schools for the time being.
(an understatement, I'm sure)

AND YOU RE SAYING THIS? LOL

DRJJ1
09-01-2006, 12:02 AM
All It Costs If You Go Into It With A Dc Dds Etc,,i Would And Consider Doing This Soon,,makes Sense,,why Would I Waste Time And Energy After Yrs In Practice,,i Would Know More In Treating Patients Than Any Harvard Med School Resident,,,for Sure

DRJJ1
09-01-2006, 12:06 AM
Its Sept 2006,,,you See,,,,most Here Have No Clue And Not Sure Of The Direction In Life

spreebee
02-22-2007, 11:32 PM
Hi, I was wondering if you could please tell me which are the 3 online med programs that you mentioned since I'm truly interested in finding more about it.
are there only 3? or more? please give me the names if you could.
please reply. thanks.

With all the rejections from the U.S., those of you looking to do an online medical education and practice in the U.S. shows your not very serious about medicine. Would you rather get you degree the easiest way and kill a patient or work your **** off the right way and be a good doctor? There's no way any online program has the same level of resourses and instruction & learning than a legitimate teacher/student atmosphere with an established institution. What are your motives in the first place? Being an M.D. for showcase? Being an M.D. involves major responsibility and it starts during your first day of education... You need to put yourself in the best position to learn because lives are possibly on the line... No hard feelings or anything...

Liass
03-09-2007, 01:10 AM
stay away from online school. you'll spent a fortune and get nothing out of it as far as quality.
been there, done that, got burned :(

nevisbutterfly
03-09-2007, 01:32 AM
I know a person in residency right now that told me and knows that she is going to have licensing problems. People in the states already think we are getting something easy by going to the Carib. We know better - lot of hoops to jump through. Any medical school that offers advanced credit for previous degrees or online training is one to stay away from.

I am not saying the people that do this is not qualified - they may have great board scores - but a HUGE licensing problem When states look at foreign medical schools, that is one of the things that will disqualify a medical school from state licensing - online training and advanced credit which is usually given to Phd's, chiro's or vets. I have read a lot of licensing websites.

I was even told to keep my passport or copies to PROVE I was in the Carib for the time I said I was. Some have told me to keep plane ticket stubs (which I don't have).

I think most boards are serious about this.

maximillian genossa
03-09-2007, 02:05 PM
About the passports and basically everything you mentioned, etc.

Licensing problems, yes, there will be because there are very few exceptions. It has been debated previously in this forum and the state licensing forum. An ex-poster and myself have done some research and contacted virtually all the state boards and got a majority that will flat out deny you licensing. So that said, I will not say that ALL states will ban you, because there are few exceptions. The exceptions were a little bit more than a handful out of 50 states but, come on, will anyone bank their future relying on a very few choices for licensing? Besides, medical boards change there rules every now and then. They may say yes today, maybe tomorrow and no the day after tomorrow.

My advise, go to a brick and mortar school, as crappy as it might look, it is for only 2 years of your life.

The US is not ready for online basic sciences yet. At least not until it becomes more mainstream.

Peace

Max





I know a person in residency right now that told me and knows that she is going to have licensing problems. People in the states already think we are getting something easy by going to the Carib. We know better - lot of hoops to jump through. Any medical school that offers advanced credit for previous degrees or online training is one to stay away from.

I am not saying the people that do this is not qualified - they may have great board scores - but a HUGE licensing problem When states look at foreign medical schools, that is one of the things that will disqualify a medical school from state licensing - online training and advanced credit which is usually given to Phd's, chiro's or vets. I have read a lot of licensing websites.

I was even told to keep my passport or copies to PROVE I was in the Carib for the time I said I was. Some have told me to keep plane ticket stubs (which I don't have).

I think most boards are serious about this.

Doc2B2007
03-15-2007, 12:04 PM
I am a current IUHS student and have been very pleased with the education thus far (3rd year). I have met and am in regular contact with graduates from IUHS who are chief residents and also with an IUHS grad who is currently doing a cardiology fellowship! Just because you do not believe in the school does not mean it is not a good school! This type of education is being used by other us medical schools currently. I have spoken with many physicians who stated that the classroom has little to do with the education as they never went to class except for exams and studied the mass produced lecture notes and their books only! The way information is delivered means nothing if you do not study it and learn! As for listing the names of the schools graduates in a public forum without their specific permission would be wrong! When these doctors are established in their practice they themselves will be proud to declare where they came from!! Time will show that this program is high quality and only time can make the true determination!

maximillian genossa
03-15-2007, 01:20 PM
..." As for listing the names of the schools graduates in a public forum without their specific permission would be wrong!"

I agreed to that, it is part of the TOS. I don't know if you were addressing my last post, but just in case, what I said is that the majority of the mainstream medical community in the U.S. is not yet ready for this kind of educational model.

Max



I am a current IUHS student and have been very pleased with the education thus far (3rd year). I have met and am in regular contact with graduates from IUHS who are chief residents and also with an IUHS grad who is currently doing a cardiology fellowship! Just because you do not believe in the school does not mean it is not a good school! This type of education is being used by other us medical schools currently. I have spoken with many physicians who stated that the classroom has little to do with the education as they never went to class except for exams and studied the mass produced lecture notes and their books only! The way information is delivered means nothing if you do not study it and learn! As for listing the names of the schools graduates in a public forum without their specific permission would be wrong! When these doctors are established in their practice they themselves will be proud to declare where they came from!! Time will show that this program is high quality and only time can make the true determination!

kawatee77
05-27-2007, 03:10 AM
The geographical and temporal distribution of these disorders suggests that they result from a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors that operate throughout life.







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